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Darrell Miller

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November 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Angels have hired former ballplayer Darrell Miller as the club's director of community relations, the team announced Thursday. Miller, 31, who played with the Angels from 1984 to 1988, will be the liaison between the Angels and the surrounding community beginning Dec. 1, a statement from the club said. As an Angel, Miller compiled a .241 batting average with eight home runs and 35 RBIs. Miller belongs to one of Southern California's most successful sports families.
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SPORTS
January 24, 2006 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
The Assn. of Professional Ball Players of America, an 82-year-old organization that offers assistance to ballplayers of all ages, including minor leaguers, held its annual charity dinner Saturday night in Long Beach. Former Angel Darrell Miller, now the director of Major League Baseball's Urban Youth Academy, set to open Feb. 28 in Compton, was among the speakers. Miller, the older brother of Cheryl and Reggie Miller, said: "Everyone here has a love for the game of baseball.
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SPORTS
March 29, 1986 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Whether he's at the plate, behind it or in the outfield, Darrell Miller cannot avoid contact this spring. His bat has been providing most of it, with the two hits he collected in Friday's game lifting his batting average to .419--second best on the club behind Wally Joyner. But there has been more when Miller takes his position in the field, either at catcher or in left field. Major contact, too.
SPORTS
December 31, 1999 | Diane Pucin
It hurts Darrell Miller when he goes into Los Angeles and looks for baseball players. It hurts Miller to see baseball fields where, he says, "They are in such bad shape you wouldn't walk your dog because you might sprain your ankle and you wouldn't let a horse race because the horse is too valuable to get him hurt. But you let athletes play baseball on these fields."
SPORTS
March 13, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
The Darrell Miller project continues, at least in the mind of Darrell Miller. This time last year, he was the Angels' catcher of the future, receiving a crash course in the art of receiving pitches. He was the experiment of the spring, and his every move behind the plate was studied and charted. His progress was considered special priority. Twelve months later, Miller is back. Maybe a few people have noticed.
SPORTS
December 8, 1991 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commissioner Fay Vincent's emphasis on considering minorities for managerial jobs has not led the Angels, Dodgers or Padres to hire a black manager. But all three teams have black or Latino managers in their farm systems who can be considered, however distantly, on the managerial track. Jerry Royster had to be convinced by Fred Claire, Dodger executive vice president, and Charlie Blaney, the club's director of minor league operations, that he would enjoy managing.
MAGAZINE
October 6, 1991 | KEVIN COOK, Kevin Cook lives in Huntington Beach and is working on a book for Random House.
CARRIE TURNER HAD A DATE. SHE WAS GOING TO THE FLAmingo, the best nightclub that admitted black people in Memphis, Tenn., in 1955. Giddy with anticipation, Carrie primped in the glow of the neon flamingo over the club's door. She climbed rickety stairs to a ballroom that shook to the jazz of Phineas Newborn Jr. and his orchestra. Newborn's saxophonist was a tall, bespectacled young man. Utterly cool in black pants and an emerald jacket, Saul Miller blew a hot tenor sax.
SPORTS
January 24, 2006 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
The Assn. of Professional Ball Players of America, an 82-year-old organization that offers assistance to ballplayers of all ages, including minor leaguers, held its annual charity dinner Saturday night in Long Beach. Former Angel Darrell Miller, now the director of Major League Baseball's Urban Youth Academy, set to open Feb. 28 in Compton, was among the speakers. Miller, the older brother of Cheryl and Reggie Miller, said: "Everyone here has a love for the game of baseball.
SPORTS
February 24, 1986 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Darrell Miller, the man who would be catcher, knows what knocks and bruises and assorted contusions await him as the Angels accelerate his learning program behind the plate this spring. But the scar Miller was displaying around the batting cage had nothing to do with a fouled tip or a knuckleball in the dirt. This small gash, dotting the hairline above his left eye, was a reminder of a not-so-pleasant Saturday drive two weeks ago through Flagstaff.
SPORTS
March 30, 1986 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
The Angels have scoured the land searching for a possible successor to Bob Boone. Just in case. They tried to trade for one, but found no Tony Penas available for less than half the franchise. They looked within their farm system, but their best prospect, 19-year-old Erik Pappas, was last seen buried in Class A with an overmatched bat. Is any heir apparent? Maybe. Last year, the Angels played him in the outfield. Meet Darrell Miller, the Angels' catcher in the raw.
SPORTS
December 8, 1991 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commissioner Fay Vincent's emphasis on considering minorities for managerial jobs has not led the Angels, Dodgers or Padres to hire a black manager. But all three teams have black or Latino managers in their farm systems who can be considered, however distantly, on the managerial track. Jerry Royster had to be convinced by Fred Claire, Dodger executive vice president, and Charlie Blaney, the club's director of minor league operations, that he would enjoy managing.
MAGAZINE
October 6, 1991 | KEVIN COOK, Kevin Cook lives in Huntington Beach and is working on a book for Random House.
CARRIE TURNER HAD A DATE. SHE WAS GOING TO THE FLAmingo, the best nightclub that admitted black people in Memphis, Tenn., in 1955. Giddy with anticipation, Carrie primped in the glow of the neon flamingo over the club's door. She climbed rickety stairs to a ballroom that shook to the jazz of Phineas Newborn Jr. and his orchestra. Newborn's saxophonist was a tall, bespectacled young man. Utterly cool in black pants and an emerald jacket, Saul Miller blew a hot tenor sax.
SPORTS
November 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Angels have hired former ballplayer Darrell Miller as the club's director of community relations, the team announced Thursday. Miller, 31, who played with the Angels from 1984 to 1988, will be the liaison between the Angels and the surrounding community beginning Dec. 1, a statement from the club said. As an Angel, Miller compiled a .241 batting average with eight home runs and 35 RBIs. Miller belongs to one of Southern California's most successful sports families.
SPORTS
September 26, 1987 | PAUL HOYNES, Special to The Times
Darrell Miller called it a brain cramp. It still hurts today. "I made a mistake," Miller said. "Everybody does." Miller lost track of the number of outs in the seventh inning, and the mistake allowed a run to score in the Angels' 7-5 loss to the Cleveland Indians Friday night at Municipal Stadium as a crowd of 10,453 gathered for the beginning of Fan Appreciation Weekend. They certainly appreciated Miller.
SPORTS
May 18, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
One rookie was trying to save a victory for another rookie when the potential final out was hit in the direction of another rookie. Sometimes, too many rookies can spoil the soup. It happened Sunday afternoon at Anaheim Stadium when Angel rookie No. 3, left fielder Mark Ryal, misplayed a dying but catchable fly ball by Baltimore's Rick Burleson--letting it bounce in front of him and then past him, allowing two Orioles to score and turn a 2-1 Angel lead into a 3-2 Angel defeat.
SPORTS
March 13, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
The Darrell Miller project continues, at least in the mind of Darrell Miller. This time last year, he was the Angels' catcher of the future, receiving a crash course in the art of receiving pitches. He was the experiment of the spring, and his every move behind the plate was studied and charted. His progress was considered special priority. Twelve months later, Miller is back. Maybe a few people have noticed.
SPORTS
March 16, 1985 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
Geoff Zahn, Luis Sanchez and Curt Kauffman pitched the Angels to a five-hit, 6-0 victory over Cleveland Friday, but Manager Gene Mauch talked later about the catcher. "I like the way Darrell Miller has been handling it," Mauch said. Miller, the brother of USC's Cheryl and UCLA's Reggie, has also been handling the bat well. He's 4 for 7 in three starts, with 4 RBIs. Miller, 26, was batting .326 at Edmonton when he was recalled by the Angels last Aug. 13. He got into 17 games, batting .
SPORTS
September 26, 1987 | PAUL HOYNES, Special to The Times
Darrell Miller called it a brain cramp. It still hurts today. "I made a mistake," Miller said. "Everybody does." Miller lost track of the number of outs in the seventh inning, and the mistake allowed a run to score in the Angels' 7-5 loss to the Cleveland Indians Friday night at Municipal Stadium as a crowd of 10,453 gathered for the beginning of Fan Appreciation Weekend. They certainly appreciated Miller.
SPORTS
March 30, 1986 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
The Angels have scoured the land searching for a possible successor to Bob Boone. Just in case. They tried to trade for one, but found no Tony Penas available for less than half the franchise. They looked within their farm system, but their best prospect, 19-year-old Erik Pappas, was last seen buried in Class A with an overmatched bat. Is any heir apparent? Maybe. Last year, the Angels played him in the outfield. Meet Darrell Miller, the Angels' catcher in the raw.
SPORTS
March 29, 1986 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Whether he's at the plate, behind it or in the outfield, Darrell Miller cannot avoid contact this spring. His bat has been providing most of it, with the two hits he collected in Friday's game lifting his batting average to .419--second best on the club behind Wally Joyner. But there has been more when Miller takes his position in the field, either at catcher or in left field. Major contact, too.
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