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January 26, 2012
Total time: 40 minutes, plus soaking time for the spinach Servings: 3 Note: This is a heavenly light salad that allows you to enjoy the aromatic flavor of dashi. You can substitute spinach with watercress, mizuna, cabbage, sprouts or peas. Light soy sauce and itokezuri (thinly sliced bonito flakes) are generally available at Japanese markets. 1/2 teaspoon salt, plus extra for seasoning the blanching water 1 bunch spinach, root ends untrimmed 3 cups of dashi (see recipe)
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FOOD
January 26, 2012
Bonito flakes and konbu seaweed dashi Total time: 40 minutes Servings: Makes about 7½ cups Note: The primary dashi is called ichiban dashi, which is used for clear soups and seasoning food. It's enjoyed for its fragrance and clean flavor. The secondary dashi made with used konbu seaweed and bonito flakes from the primary dashi is called nibanashi. This is also a multi-purpose dashi that is used for miso soups and seasoning foods, but the flavor is blander than the first one. The used konbu can be sliced and eaten straight, in soups or seasoned with soy sauce.
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FOOD
March 7, 2001
There is a much easier way to prepare dashi, the uniquely flavored and indispensable stock for miso soup ('Miso in America," Feb. 21). Prepared dashi powder is sold in small boxes containing several sealed packets, much like bouillon, and available in any market selling Japanese groceries. Using prepared dashi, one can make as much or as little miso as one wants and have it at once. Simply boil the amount of water wanted for soup, add some of the powdered dashi (it dissolves instantly)
FOOD
January 26, 2012
There are several types of katsuobushi that can be used for different purposes. The best will have light pink or beige shavings that will be slightly shiny. Once the packages are opened, the katsuobushi will begin to oxidize and go limp, and the color becomes dull. Katsuobushi is best stored in the freezer. Hanakatsuo is thin petals that resemble large wood shavings. Some contain chiai (dark meat). Shaved karebushi makes a flavorful stock full of aroma.
FOOD
January 26, 2012 | Sonoko Sakai
At the heart of so much of Japanese cooking is the fragrant broth called dashi. And at the heart of dashi are the delicate pink petals of katsuobushi, shaved flakes of dried bonito fish. When steeped with the dried seaweed called konbu, katsuobushi gives dashi its irresistible aroma and deep umami flavor. Despite being made in minutes, the stock is the foundation of many Japanese dishes -- miso soup, salad dressings, sauces for noodles, even meat stews. " Dashi is like the key actor in a movie," says 83-year-old Chobei Yagi, whose 275-year-old store, Tokyo's Yagicho Honten, specializes in katsuobushi and other dried foods.
FOOD
January 26, 2012
Bonito flakes and konbu seaweed dashi Total time: 40 minutes Servings: Makes about 7½ cups Note: The primary dashi is called ichiban dashi, which is used for clear soups and seasoning food. It's enjoyed for its fragrance and clean flavor. The secondary dashi made with used konbu seaweed and bonito flakes from the primary dashi is called nibanashi. This is also a multi-purpose dashi that is used for miso soups and seasoning foods, but the flavor is blander than the first one. The used konbu can be sliced and eaten straight, in soups or seasoned with soy sauce.
FOOD
January 26, 2012
There are several types of katsuobushi that can be used for different purposes. The best will have light pink or beige shavings that will be slightly shiny. Once the packages are opened, the katsuobushi will begin to oxidize and go limp, and the color becomes dull. Katsuobushi is best stored in the freezer. Hanakatsuo is thin petals that resemble large wood shavings. Some contain chiai (dark meat). Shaved karebushi makes a flavorful stock full of aroma.
FOOD
November 4, 2010
  Miso soup with clams and chives Total time: 30 minutes, plus overnight soaking time for the clams Servings: 4 Note: You can make a second batch of dashi by combining the used bonito flakes and kombu seaweed in a saucepan with 4 cups of water. Bring it to a boil over medium heat and then simmer for about 5 minutes. Strain and discard the bonito flakes and kombu seaweed. Use the dashi for miso soups, seasoning, etc. It will not be as flavorful as the first batch, but it is still good.
FOOD
December 30, 2009
Dashi-maki tamago (home-style Japanese omelet) Total time: 1 hour, 15 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Konbu (dried seaweed), dried bonito flakes and light soy sauce can be found at Japanese markets. Tamago frying pans are available at Japanese markets, but you can use a round 10-inch nonstick frying pan. This recipe calls for a bamboo sushi mat, available at Japanese stores. Dashi 1 piece konbu (6 to 8 inches long) 4 cups water 2 cups dried bonito flakes (katsuo-bushi)
FOOD
February 2, 2013 | Jonathan Gold, Restaurant Critic
When you order shoyu ramen, you see the noodle chef spoon soy sauce into the bowl before he ladles in the bone broth; when you specify that you want your noodles al dente, you see him check their status a couple of times before swishing them out of the boiling water. If you ask for green-chile butter, the restaurant's equivalent of what some other noodle shops call a "flavor bomb," you are served it on the side, to mix in as you like. Sitting at the counter is kind of a demystifying process, in the way that being able to see a sushi chef flash his knife through a half-dozen kinds of silvery fish helps you to understand what the difference might be between mackerel and gizzard shad.
FOOD
January 26, 2012 | Sonoko Sakai
At the heart of so much of Japanese cooking is the fragrant broth called dashi. And at the heart of dashi are the delicate pink petals of katsuobushi, shaved flakes of dried bonito fish. When steeped with the dried seaweed called konbu, katsuobushi gives dashi its irresistible aroma and deep umami flavor. Despite being made in minutes, the stock is the foundation of many Japanese dishes -- miso soup, salad dressings, sauces for noodles, even meat stews. " Dashi is like the key actor in a movie," says 83-year-old Chobei Yagi, whose 275-year-old store, Tokyo's Yagicho Honten, specializes in katsuobushi and other dried foods.
FOOD
January 26, 2012
Total time: 40 minutes, plus soaking time for the spinach Servings: 3 Note: This is a heavenly light salad that allows you to enjoy the aromatic flavor of dashi. You can substitute spinach with watercress, mizuna, cabbage, sprouts or peas. Light soy sauce and itokezuri (thinly sliced bonito flakes) are generally available at Japanese markets. 1/2 teaspoon salt, plus extra for seasoning the blanching water 1 bunch spinach, root ends untrimmed 3 cups of dashi (see recipe)
FOOD
November 4, 2010
  Miso soup with clams and chives Total time: 30 minutes, plus overnight soaking time for the clams Servings: 4 Note: You can make a second batch of dashi by combining the used bonito flakes and kombu seaweed in a saucepan with 4 cups of water. Bring it to a boil over medium heat and then simmer for about 5 minutes. Strain and discard the bonito flakes and kombu seaweed. Use the dashi for miso soups, seasoning, etc. It will not be as flavorful as the first batch, but it is still good.
FOOD
December 30, 2009
Dashi-maki tamago (home-style Japanese omelet) Total time: 1 hour, 15 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Konbu (dried seaweed), dried bonito flakes and light soy sauce can be found at Japanese markets. Tamago frying pans are available at Japanese markets, but you can use a round 10-inch nonstick frying pan. This recipe calls for a bamboo sushi mat, available at Japanese stores. Dashi 1 piece konbu (6 to 8 inches long) 4 cups water 2 cups dried bonito flakes (katsuo-bushi)
FOOD
March 7, 2001
There is a much easier way to prepare dashi, the uniquely flavored and indispensable stock for miso soup ('Miso in America," Feb. 21). Prepared dashi powder is sold in small boxes containing several sealed packets, much like bouillon, and available in any market selling Japanese groceries. Using prepared dashi, one can make as much or as little miso as one wants and have it at once. Simply boil the amount of water wanted for soup, add some of the powdered dashi (it dissolves instantly)
FOOD
January 26, 2012
Miso soup with crispy age tofu, nappa cabbage and green onions Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Do not reheat the miso soup after the miso has been added; the flavor diminishes with reheating. Miso paste is generally available in the Asian sections of well-stocked supermarkets, as well as at Asian markets; age tofu (deep-fried tofu) is available at Japanese markets. 1 quart dashi 3 to 4 tablespoons miso paste (red or white or koji miso paste)
FOOD
March 25, 1998 | CHARITY FERREIRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paper-wrapped salmon is a variation on the classic dish saumon en papillote, using different aromatics. Like the classic French dish, the fish fillet is baked in parchment paper so it steams quickly. The parchment paper puffs up, capturing the juices and flavor. When you open the package at the table, the delicate fragrance of salmon steamed with ginger, green onions and cilantro is released. Season some Japanese soba noodles with a little sesame oil to go with the fish.
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