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Dashiell Hammett

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2011
A previously unpublished short story by the late crime writer Dashiell Hammett will appear in the Strand Magazine this week, its managing editor, Andrew Gulli, said Tuesday. But 14 other stories that he discovered while researching the author at the University of Texas will remain unseen, he said, because Hammett's estate decided not to publish them. "So I Shot Him" revolves around the character named Rainey who challenges a man to overcome his irrational fear of water, with surprising consequences.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Congratulations to the San Francisco Chronicle for launching a literary map of its city. The interactive map includes quotes from famed San Francisco area authors, including Dashiell Hammett, John Steinbeck and Armistead Maupin. Not unlike our own literary map of Los Angeles . Of course, the Golden Gate Bridge has appeared many times in the literature of San Francisco, but the map stretches farther afield. There's Hammett on the Stockton Tunnell, Hunter S. Thompson on the Daley City Drive-in, Ishmael Reed on Oakland and Alegra Goodman on the Berkeley Hills.
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BOOKS
August 27, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Sixty years after its initial publication, "The Maltese Falcon" remains one of the most skillfully written detective novels in the history of the genre. As few modern readers will be able to erase the images from the classic 1941 film, it's interesting to contrast the Dashiell Hammett and John Huston versions of the characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Is the surest way to literary success the pairing of two cultural masters? There's a pile of books on my desk that say, yes, it is. They total two novels, one history and one set of correspondence. The subjects are two literary figures who were a couple, two literary figures whose relationship is imaginary, a musical master and his wife, and two literary lions writing to one another. These books are brought together by titles that are, in most instances, a set of paired names.
BOOKS
January 30, 2005 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography" and editor of Margaret Millar's "The Couple Next Door: Collected Short Mysteries."
"That strange Marylander" is what Henry Louis Mencken ("the sage of Baltimore") called Samuel Dashiell Hammett, who was born in the Old Line State in 1894, 45 years after Edgar Allan Poe died there. Like Poe, Hammett grew up in an America still fashioning its social and cultural identity from raw materials. And like Poe, inventor of the detective story, Hammett would write tales that held not only the shocks and thrills of entertainment but also the lights and shadows of art.
TRAVEL
July 30, 1995 | PATRICK MOTT, Mott is a Santa Ana-based free-lance writer. and
The weather looked promising as the plane descended into Oakland International Airport: low overcast, gusty, needle-cold, flat gray. Just the sort of gloom that would chase Sam Spade out into the alleys and shadows of the city, looking for trouble. I wasn't looking for trouble. I was looking for Spade. And his creator, writer Dashiell Hammett.
BOOKS
May 6, 2001 | DICK LOCHTE, Dick Lochte writes the regular "Mysteries" column for Southern California Living
"Hammett was the ace performer," wrote Raymond Chandler in his frequently quoted 1944 essay, "The Simple Art of Murder." "He did over and over again what only the best writers can ever do at all. He wrote scenes that seemed never to have been written before." Chandler's appraisal of Dashiell Hammett's influence on American crime fiction is unassailable.
BOOKS
March 31, 1996
For a collection of the correspondence of my father, Dashiell Hammett, author of "The Maltese Falcon," we would appreciate photocopies of any letters, postcards or telegrams. JOSEPHINE HAMMETT MARSHALL and DON HERRON, P.O. BOX 982, GLEN ELLEN, CA 95442-0982 For a book I am writing on the Women's Army Corps during World War II, I'd appreciate letters, tapes or phone calls from women who served. I'd also like to hear from you if you have recollections of a relative who served.
BOOKS
July 28, 1996 | Allen Barra, Allen Barra writes regularly for the New York Observer and The New York Times. His biography of Wyatt Earp is due next year from William Morrow
A few years ago, working on a piece about the school of hard-boiled detective fiction, I reread Dashiell Hammett's "The Thin Man" for the first time in 15 years and was shocked. The wise-cracking private eyes Nick and Nora Charles of my memory had been replaced by a pair of cynical, hard-drinking shrews who seemed at least as unsavory as the characters they were trying to put in jail.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2011
A previously unpublished short story by the late crime writer Dashiell Hammett will appear in the Strand Magazine this week, its managing editor, Andrew Gulli, said Tuesday. But 14 other stories that he discovered while researching the author at the University of Texas will remain unseen, he said, because Hammett's estate decided not to publish them. "So I Shot Him" revolves around the character named Rainey who challenges a man to overcome his irrational fear of water, with surprising consequences.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
These days, Ireland sometimes seems to export writers the way it once did priests. Not least among them is a fine group of first-water crime novelists, including the redoubtable John Banville writing under the pseudonym Benjamin Black. Declan Hughes also comes to the genre from a more elevated literary angle — in his case, a successful career as a playwright and screenwriter that included a stint as artistic director of the well-regarded Rough Magic Theatre Company, which he co-founded, and a writerly association with the Abbey Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2009 | Sarah Weinman
Writing a contemporary follow-up to a classic novel is either an act of bravery or chutzpah -- or perhaps both. One must contend with vociferous readers who consider the classic so sacrosanct they deem any new work heretical. In the last few months alone, the news of impending sequels to A.A.
BOOKS
June 11, 2006 | Leslie Schwartz, Leslie Schwartz is the author of the novels "Jumping the Green" and "Angels Crest." She is currently at work on a book about the U.S. juvenile justice system.
JUST in case books written by women haven't been shoehorned into enough marketing categories, there's a new one, coined in the Washington Post. So-called pink mysteries are books by women that feature a female protagonist (miserable love life optional) who solves crimes while decked out in designer heels and expensive manicures. No hard-boiled detectives in trench coats please!
BOOKS
January 30, 2005 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography" and editor of Margaret Millar's "The Couple Next Door: Collected Short Mysteries."
"That strange Marylander" is what Henry Louis Mencken ("the sage of Baltimore") called Samuel Dashiell Hammett, who was born in the Old Line State in 1894, 45 years after Edgar Allan Poe died there. Like Poe, Hammett grew up in an America still fashioning its social and cultural identity from raw materials. And like Poe, inventor of the detective story, Hammett would write tales that held not only the shocks and thrills of entertainment but also the lights and shadows of art.
BOOKS
September 21, 2003 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography."
People have been talking in one way or another about the black bird -- ex-detective Dashiell Hammett's third and classic novel, "The Maltese Falcon" -- ever since its original serial publication in Black Mask magazine in 1929. As a 1930 Knopf hardcover, the book was an immediate bestseller, going through seven printings that year. The "Falcon," a masterpiece of American hard-boiled writing, revolutionized the detective novel, and its merit as literature was seen from the first by critics.
TRAVEL
July 17, 1988 | JAMES A. MARTIN, Martin is a San Francisco free-lance writer.
The Hall of Justice was dirty and reeked of evil. The City Hall, the D.A. and the cops ran the town as though they owned it, and they did. . . . You could play roulette in the Marina, shoot craps on O'Farrell, play poker on Mason, and get rolled at 4 a.m. in a bar on Eddy.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 2001 | TOM NOLAN
Often called the father of "hard-boiled" crime fiction, Dashiell Hammett wrote such classics as "The Maltese Falcon" and "The Thin Man" during the 1920s and '30s, creating iconic characters Sam Spade and Nick and Nora Charles. A longtime companion of playwright Lillian Hellman, Hammett was jailed briefly during the McCarthy era for refusing to answer questions regarding left-wing group the Civil Rights Congress.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 2001 | TOM NOLAN
Often called the father of "hard-boiled" crime fiction, Dashiell Hammett wrote such classics as "The Maltese Falcon" and "The Thin Man" during the 1920s and '30s, creating iconic characters Sam Spade and Nick and Nora Charles. A longtime companion of playwright Lillian Hellman, Hammett was jailed briefly during the McCarthy era for refusing to answer questions regarding left-wing group the Civil Rights Congress.
BOOKS
May 6, 2001 | DICK LOCHTE, Dick Lochte writes the regular "Mysteries" column for Southern California Living
"Hammett was the ace performer," wrote Raymond Chandler in his frequently quoted 1944 essay, "The Simple Art of Murder." "He did over and over again what only the best writers can ever do at all. He wrote scenes that seemed never to have been written before." Chandler's appraisal of Dashiell Hammett's influence on American crime fiction is unassailable.
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