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November 5, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Social psychologist Diederik Stapel made a name for himself by pushing his field into new territory. His research papers appeared to demonstrate that exposure to litter and graffiti makes people more likely to commit small crimes and that being in a messy environment encourages people to buy into racial stereotypes, among other things. But these and other unusual findings are likely to be invalidated. An interim report released last week from an investigative committee at his university in the Netherlands concluded that Stapel blatantly faked data for dozens of papers over several years.
October 2, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency collected samples of records showing where Americans were when they made mobile phone calls in 2010 and 2011 to test how it could obtain and process the data in bulk, but decided not to move forward with the plan, intelligence officials disclosed Wednesday. The admission by NSA chief Keith Alexander to a Senate committee solved part of a mystery about the digital spying agency's involvement with data that could reveal the day-to-day movements of - and deeply personal information about - every cellphone user.
February 1, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan
William Holmes was at his desk at a downtown San Francisco engineering firm when a message from the U.S. Geological Survey flashed onto his computer screen: A magnitude 7.0 earthquake had struck 10 miles from the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince. Within minutes, Holmes was making plans for a team of geotechnical engineers, architects and seismic design experts to scour Haiti's devastated landscape and collect data to be analyzed in laboratories back home. Theirs will be a humanitarian mission in the broadest sense.
September 17, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
Pity the medically uninsured in America. As if they don't already have enough to worry about, now they've become a political football. Opponents and supporters of healthcare reform toss assertions about them back and forth. Their number is debated -- are they 46 million people? 30 million? Eight million? Their motivations for not having health coverage are questioned: Are they "young invincibles" who think they're too healthy to need it? Too rich to need it? Or just cheapskates?
March 31, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The National Science Foundation has awarded $10 million to UC Berkeley for the purpose of advancing "big data" research and technologies. The grant was part of a larger initiative by the Obama administration that allocated $200 million around the country to big data technology Thursday.  The Berkeley funds will go toward the university's Algorithms, Machines and People Expedition, which is already conducting several projects tackling...
September 19, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
New census data released Thursday painted a grim picture of the economic recovery in the United States. Still there were bright spots in California. Poverty levels and household incomes for 2012 remained below 2007 levels in many parts of the country and haven't changed much from the year before. The number of Americans living in poverty -- a record 46.5 million -- remained largely unchanged in 2012.  And the data show that the share of households with incomes below $24,999 stands at 24.4%.
September 20, 2013 | By Jack Mosbacher
In the coming weeks, Gov. Jerry Brown will likely sign AB 484, a measure that would put the state at odds with the Obama administration and risk $1.5 billion in federal funding by effectively suspending data collection on K-12 student achievement for the current school year as the state transitions to the Common Core curriculum. What this effort doesn't consider is that there are other crucial changes taking place in California's education system, including different ways to allocate funding to schools.
November 20, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
The brilliant brains of many new cars can share their secrets through the Internet, allowing car owners to be alerted through their smartphones about when exactly to fill up with gas, what might be causing that funky engine noise and when their children are taking out the family car for joy rides. Now, several companies are trying to give owners of many older cars the same ability to constantly and wirelessly access the knowledge hidden in on-board diagnostics units. The companies are building gadgets somewhere in between a Fitbit-like health monitor, a motion sensor and Google Chromecast.
July 31, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The Great Recession wasn't quite as bad as previously thought and the recovery since 2009 has been a bit stronger, according to a periodic data recalculation designed to better reflect the economic impact of movies, TV shows and other intellectual property. The economy contracted an at average annual rate of 2.9% during the recession, which ran from the fourth quarter of 2007 through the second quarter of 2009, compared to the previous estimate of a 3.2% contraction, the Commerce Department said Wednesday.
May 12, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
When the government launched a nationwide campaign to register cellphones, millions of Mexicans refused. And thousands of others registered with a familiar name: Felipe Calderon, the country's president. The idea was that the registry would combat rampant telephone extortion rackets and kidnapping attempts. But even with the threat of having their lines disconnected, an estimated 26 million users (about 30% of all holders of cellphones in Mexico) hadn't submitted their names on the eve of the government-set deadline.
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