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BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Ryan Faughnder, Los Angeles Times
Data broker Spokeo Inc. will pay $800,000 to settle a Federal Trade Commission lawsuit that alleged the Pasadena company illegally sold personal information. Spokeo collects and aggregates data such as home addresses, email addresses and telephone numbers from public records and social media sites. It compiles that information into profiles, which it sells to subscribers. The FTC's statement on the settlement said the company sold data to businesses "in the human resources, background screening and recruiting industries" in violation of the law. Until 2010, Spokeo marketed its services to employers and recruiters.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
Pity the medically uninsured in America. As if they don't already have enough to worry about, now they've become a political football. Opponents and supporters of healthcare reform toss assertions about them back and forth. Their number is debated -- are they 46 million people? 30 million? Eight million? Their motivations for not having health coverage are questioned: Are they "young invincibles" who think they're too healthy to need it? Too rich to need it? Or just cheapskates?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Ben Welsh and Robert J. Lopez
A nationally recognized data expert brought in by Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to restore confidence in the Fire Department's emergency response times is leaving after less than three months on the job. Jeffrey Godown, who was installed as interim director of statistical analysis in March amid a ballooning controversy over the accuracy of the department's performance data, is leaving Tuesday to take a job at UC San Francisco. He said he planned to continue working as a consultant with the department to improve its data analysis, which he said still suffered from fundamental problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2010 | By Jason Felch and Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said Monday that parents have a right to know if their children's teachers are effective, endorsing the public release of information about how well individual teachers fare at raising their students' test scores. "What's there to hide?" Duncan said in an interview one day after The Times published an analysis of teacher effectiveness in the Los Angeles Unified School District, the nation's second largest school system. "In education, we've been scared to talk about success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2012 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Federal officials have opened a criminal investigation to determine whether confidential information was obtained illegally on hundreds of patients who rode in Los Angeles Fire Department ambulances, a high-level city lawyer said Wednesday. The Fire Department has begun informing past patients that personal records, including Social Security numbers and birth dates, were accessed "deliberately and maliciously" by an employee of the company that provides ambulance billing services to the city.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2011 | Reuters
A pullback could be on the table this week for U.S. stocks after their best weekly performance in two years, especially if a raft of data headlined by the June jobs report doesn't bolster the argument of a strengthening economy. Stocks rose for five straight days last week as the fog of the Greek debt crisis appeared to once again be lifted while better-than-anticipated economic numbers, such as Friday's manufacturing data, gave weight to the belief that the U.S. economy was starting to recover from a soft patch.
WORLD
May 12, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
When the government launched a nationwide campaign to register cellphones, millions of Mexicans refused. And thousands of others registered with a familiar name: Felipe Calderon, the country's president. The idea was that the registry would combat rampant telephone extortion rackets and kidnapping attempts. But even with the threat of having their lines disconnected, an estimated 26 million users (about 30% of all holders of cellphones in Mexico) hadn't submitted their names on the eve of the government-set deadline.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
The Federal Trade Commission has asked Google Inc. not to destroy any documents related to the data it collected from unsecured wireless networks as it gathered images for its Street View photo-map archive, according to a person familiar with the matter. "We're working with the relevant authorities to answer their questions and concerns," a Google official said. Citing legal issues, Google said it has not complied with a request from Germany to turn over Internet data and e-mails it collected from the networks as its roving Street View cars collected images.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2009 | By David Sarno
IPhone users guilty of hogging data could see their phone bills fattening. In a presentation to investors Wednesday, AT&T's head of consumer services, Ralph de la Vega, said that just 3% of iPhone users generate 40% of the data traffic on AT&T's cellphone network. As such AT&T, the exclusive carrier of the iPhone, is likely to introduce a pricing system that would penalize heavy data users, encouraging them "to either reduce or modify their usage so they don't crowd out the other customers in those same cell sites," he said.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Democrat Al Franken, locked in a tight Senate race and headed to a recount, sued for access to data on rejected absentee ballots. The suit was filed in Ramsey County District Court, but his campaign hopes a ruling in its favor would be applied statewide. Franken trails GOP incumbent Norm Coleman by 206 votes in unofficial results. The results are to be certified Tuesday, and the recount is to start the next day.
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