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January 9, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) has fired his sometimes-critic Rep. Dave McCurdy (D-Okla.) as chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, the Speaker's office and McCurdy disclosed Friday. The 42-year-old McCurdy said that Foley informed him that he would not be reappointed to the post he has held for almost two years, even though chairmen are permitted to serve four-year terms. McCurdy attributed the change to the Speaker's "desire to place his own team on the committee."
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NEWS
December 7, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Oklahoma Rep. Dave McCurdy, chairman of the centrist group that helped launch President Clinton's 1992 White House bid, Tuesday branded Clinton an "old Democrat" at heart and warned that he must mend his ideological ways or risk losing the organization's support. McCurdy's remarks to the 10th annual conference of the Democratic Leadership Council reflected the resentment and disappointment felt by many in his audience.
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NEWS
January 26, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Attorneys for former White House aide Oliver L. North disclosed in court Wednesday that they have subpoenaed two House members and records from three congressional committees for North's trial beginning next week on charges stemming from the Iran-Contra scandal. However, attorneys for the House of Representatives and independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh immediately served notice they would ask a federal judge to quash the congressional subpoenas on grounds they were overly broad. U.S.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
As chairman of the centrist Democratic Leadership Council once headed by Bill Clinton, Rep. Dave McCurdy of Oklahoma has long clamored for a "New Democrat" agenda distinct from traditional liberalism. As a candidate for a Senate seat this fall, McCurdy still emphasizes some signature New Democrat ideas, such as personal responsibility, skill-training and welfare reform. But in his closely fought contest against conservative Republican Rep. James M.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton met here Friday with Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), believed to be his selection for secretary of defense, and sources said Rep. Dave McCurdy (D-Okla.) was likely to be offered the post of director of central intelligence. It was unclear whether McCurdy, 42, who had mounted an aggressive bid for the Pentagon job, would accept the CIA post. He has suggested he would prefer to remain in the House of Representatives than take charge of the CIA.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairmen of Congress' intelligence committees unveiled a plan Wednesday for a sweeping reorganization of the nation's spy agencies that would strip the CIA of some of its duties and give overall responsibility for intelligence-gathering to a new director of national intelligence. The blueprint would involve by far the biggest change in government intelligence since the CIA was created after World War II. Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman David L. Boren and his House counterpart, Rep.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Oklahoma Rep. Dave McCurdy, chairman of the centrist group that helped launch President Clinton's 1992 White House bid, Tuesday branded Clinton an "old Democrat" at heart and warned that he must mend his ideological ways or risk losing the organization's support. McCurdy's remarks to the 10th annual conference of the Democratic Leadership Council reflected the resentment and disappointment felt by many in his audience.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITERS
In a preview of themes that could dominate the Democratic Party's presidential race, seven declared or likely candidates appearing Saturday before a group of party insiders presented themselves as outsiders committed to shaking up the party, the political system and the nation.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
As chairman of the centrist Democratic Leadership Council once headed by Bill Clinton, Rep. Dave McCurdy of Oklahoma has long clamored for a "New Democrat" agenda distinct from traditional liberalism. As a candidate for a Senate seat this fall, McCurdy still emphasizes some signature New Democrat ideas, such as personal responsibility, skill-training and welfare reform. But in his closely fought contest against conservative Republican Rep. James M.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
At recess time at St. Edmond's parochial school in south Philadelphia, the youngsters crowd around to watch blue-uniformed volunteers from the Philadelphia Youth Service Corps swarm over the 75-year-old structure, painting the trim and patching the concrete. "The building looks wonderful," says Sister Nancy Marie Firn, the principal. "But the best thing about this is that it gives the children a chance to see people working together to help someone else."
NEWS
January 9, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) has fired his sometimes-critic Rep. Dave McCurdy (D-Okla.) as chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, the Speaker's office and McCurdy disclosed Friday. The 42-year-old McCurdy said that Foley informed him that he would not be reappointed to the post he has held for almost two years, even though chairmen are permitted to serve four-year terms. McCurdy attributed the change to the Speaker's "desire to place his own team on the committee."
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton met here Friday with Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), believed to be his selection for secretary of defense, and sources said Rep. Dave McCurdy (D-Okla.) was likely to be offered the post of director of central intelligence. It was unclear whether McCurdy, 42, who had mounted an aggressive bid for the Pentagon job, would accept the CIA post. He has suggested he would prefer to remain in the House of Representatives than take charge of the CIA.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairmen of Congress' intelligence committees unveiled a plan Wednesday for a sweeping reorganization of the nation's spy agencies that would strip the CIA of some of its duties and give overall responsibility for intelligence-gathering to a new director of national intelligence. The blueprint would involve by far the biggest change in government intelligence since the CIA was created after World War II. Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman David L. Boren and his House counterpart, Rep.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITERS
In a preview of themes that could dominate the Democratic Party's presidential race, seven declared or likely candidates appearing Saturday before a group of party insiders presented themselves as outsiders committed to shaking up the party, the political system and the nation.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
At recess time at St. Edmond's parochial school in south Philadelphia, the youngsters crowd around to watch blue-uniformed volunteers from the Philadelphia Youth Service Corps swarm over the 75-year-old structure, painting the trim and patching the concrete. "The building looks wonderful," says Sister Nancy Marie Firn, the principal. "But the best thing about this is that it gives the children a chance to see people working together to help someone else."
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Attorneys for former White House aide Oliver L. North disclosed in court Wednesday that they have subpoenaed two House members and records from three congressional committees for North's trial beginning next week on charges stemming from the Iran-Contra scandal. However, attorneys for the House of Representatives and independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh immediately served notice they would ask a federal judge to quash the congressional subpoenas on grounds they were overly broad. U.S.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rep. Dan Glickman (D-Kan.) is the choice of the House leadership to take over the Intelligence Committee, congressional staff members said. Rep. Norm Dicks (D-Wash.) had topped many lists as a likely replacement for Rep. Dave McCurdy (D-Okla.), who was removed last week by House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.). But George Behan, Dicks' press secretary, said that after discussions with members of Foley's staff, "we expect and understand the new chairman will be Glickman."
NEWS
January 29, 1993 | Reuters
Rep. Dan Glickman (D-Kan.) was named Thursday by Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) as chairman of the House Select Committee on Intelligence. The committee and its Senate counterpart oversee activities of the CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies. Most of the committee's work is done in secret. Glickman, 48, replaces Rep. Dave McCurdy (D-Okla.), who was removed by Foley after serving nine years as chairman.
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