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David A Kay

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NEWS
October 18, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
United Nations inspectors trying to uncover Iraq's far-flung nuclear program could not have begun to accomplish their task without sensitive intelligence provided by the United States and its Gulf War allies, the chief U.N. nuclear sleuth told Congress on Thursday. In his most detailed public account of the U.N. inspection effort, David A.
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WORLD
February 1, 2004 | Bob Drogin and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
The re-education of David Kay began just days after the CIA sent him to Baghdad in June to take over the troubled hunt for weapons of mass destruction. On July 4, Kay reached for his computer and wrote his first weekly progress report to CIA brass back in Virginia. Kay warned that he already had doubts about the agency's prewar assertions that former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein had vast quantities of nerve gases and germ weapons, and had sought to build nuclear arms.
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NEWS
October 1, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. inspectors relayed contents of some disputed Iraqi nuclear documents to U.S. officials in Washington by satellite telephone during the Baghdad standoff, the U.N. commission on the destruction of Iraqi arms acknowledged Monday. The inspectors briefed the State Department on the documents' contents for the first two days they were surrounded by Iraqi guards in the parking lot of the Iraq Atomic Energy Commission, a U.N. commission spokesman said. When U.N.
WORLD
January 29, 2004 | Bob Drogin, Times Staff Writer
David Kay, the former chief American weapons hunter in Iraq, told Congress on Wednesday that U.S. intelligence about Saddam Hussein's suspected weapons of mass destruction was fundamentally flawed before the war but was not deliberately distorted. He called for the creation of an independent commission to study the failure and recommend reforms.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dogged band of United Nations nuclear inspectors suddenly drew global attention Tuesday as Iraq and the United States edged closer to the brink of armed confrontation when the U.N. experts uncovered a priceless stash of documents describing the Iraqi nuclear program in unprecedented detail. David A.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States announced Tuesday that it was sending two battalions of Patriot missile systems to the Middle East on a day when Iraq again detained a U.N. nuclear inspection team in an action condemned by the Security Council. Iraq capitulated late Tuesday to U.N. demands that it provide unrestricted helicopter flights for the inspectors. But the Iraqis' decision to interfere with the 44-member U.N. team in Baghdad angered members of the Security Council.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | Associated Press
The hub of Iraq's nuclear weapons program was a scientific research center, Al Atheer, about 40 miles south of Baghdad, according to a report by Hans Blix, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar. Iraqi President Saddam Hussein had planned to design and produce a nuclear bomb at the center, the report said. U.S.
WORLD
January 29, 2004 | Bob Drogin, Times Staff Writer
David Kay, the former chief American weapons hunter in Iraq, told Congress on Wednesday that U.S. intelligence about Saddam Hussein's suspected weapons of mass destruction was fundamentally flawed before the war but was not deliberately distorted. He called for the creation of an independent commission to study the failure and recommend reforms.
WORLD
February 1, 2004 | Bob Drogin and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
The re-education of David Kay began just days after the CIA sent him to Baghdad in June to take over the troubled hunt for weapons of mass destruction. On July 4, Kay reached for his computer and wrote his first weekly progress report to CIA brass back in Virginia. Kay warned that he already had doubts about the agency's prewar assertions that former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein had vast quantities of nerve gases and germ weapons, and had sought to build nuclear arms.
OPINION
February 11, 2004
The last few weeks have not been good ones for the doctrine of preemptive war. Former weapons inspector David A. Kay told the Senate "we were all wrong" to believe that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction. President Bush acknowledged that the intelligence leading to the Iraq war was faulty. Those conclusions should sound the death knell for the policy of waging war purely to get rid of a future threat. More than 500 U.S.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
United Nations inspectors trying to uncover Iraq's far-flung nuclear program could not have begun to accomplish their task without sensitive intelligence provided by the United States and its Gulf War allies, the chief U.N. nuclear sleuth told Congress on Thursday. In his most detailed public account of the U.N. inspection effort, David A.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | Associated Press
The hub of Iraq's nuclear weapons program was a scientific research center, Al Atheer, about 40 miles south of Baghdad, according to a report by Hans Blix, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar. Iraqi President Saddam Hussein had planned to design and produce a nuclear bomb at the center, the report said. U.S.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. inspectors relayed contents of some disputed Iraqi nuclear documents to U.S. officials in Washington by satellite telephone during the Baghdad standoff, the U.N. commission on the destruction of Iraqi arms acknowledged Monday. The inspectors briefed the State Department on the documents' contents for the first two days they were surrounded by Iraqi guards in the parking lot of the Iraq Atomic Energy Commission, a U.N. commission spokesman said. When U.N.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States announced Tuesday that it was sending two battalions of Patriot missile systems to the Middle East on a day when Iraq again detained a U.N. nuclear inspection team in an action condemned by the Security Council. Iraq capitulated late Tuesday to U.N. demands that it provide unrestricted helicopter flights for the inspectors. But the Iraqis' decision to interfere with the 44-member U.N. team in Baghdad angered members of the Security Council.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dogged band of United Nations nuclear inspectors suddenly drew global attention Tuesday as Iraq and the United States edged closer to the brink of armed confrontation when the U.N. experts uncovered a priceless stash of documents describing the Iraqi nuclear program in unprecedented detail. David A.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq operated a secret, ambitious program to build a hydrogen bomb, a parallel effort to its already disclosed, huge push to develop an atomic bomb, U.N. officials said Tuesday. After briefing Security Council members, Hans Blix, director of the International Atomic Energy Agency, told reporters here that documents recovered by a 45-member U.N.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraq offered a formula late Wednesday to allow 44 besieged U.N. nuclear inspectors to go free and to take with them documents they had seized--a plan that the Security Council's president said "could be a breakthrough" in a tense, two-day standoff.
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