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David Cronenberg

ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Before it became known as psychoanalysis, the radical new method of dealing with emotional crises pioneered by Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and others was known simply as "the talking cure. " And it is talk - smart, satisfying and sometimes even thrilling - that is at the heart of "A Dangerous Method. " "Method" stars Viggo Mortensen as Freud, Michael Fassbender as Jung, and a game but somewhat miscast Keira Knightley as Sabina Spielrein, a woman who influenced them both. The confident directing style of David Cronenberg is essential in making this kind of intellectually stimulating cinema look easy, but the critical component in the film's success is Christopher Hampton's classically well-written script.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Two years ago, a bass-baritone covered in gook stalked the stage of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. That was the medieval monster in Elliot Goldenthal's "Grendel," commissioned by Los Angeles Opera. Sunday afternoon, a baritone covered in gook again stalked the Chandler stage. This time it was Brundle, the scientist hero transmogrified into a Musca domestica in Howard Shore's "The Fly," inspired by the 1986 David Cronenberg horror film -- the latest opera commissioned by the company.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
IN DIRECTOR David Cronenberg's 1986 movie "The Fly" -- remember "Be afraid. Be very afraid"? -- scientist Seth Brundle (Jeff Goldblum) commits a fatal error when he combines his own genes with those of a common housefly. At Los Angeles Opera these days, another dicey blending of species is taking place: Film directors are mutating into opera directors -- with, it's hoped, less alarming results. The Cuisinart that mistakenly mixes Brundle's DNA with that of an insect in "The Fly" is a "telepod," designed to teleport objects and, occasionally, living beings.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
David Cronenberg is what you might call a textbook auteur. Throughout his 40-year career, from his early experiments in gross-out horror ("Shivers," "Rabid") to his inspired takes on outre literature ("Naked Lunch," "Crash") to his current phase as a sly genre deconstructionist, the Canadian director has assembled a fiercely coherent body of work.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
David Cronenberg has always had something to say about the grotesque transformations that result when science and technology transgress the flesh, and the ensuing social breakdown. But there was a time when he spoke about it in the language of experiments, infections, mutations, identity-altering drugs, malignant broadcast signals, genetic accidents. Lately, he's moved away from the altered body to focus on larger organisms.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2007 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
AS Viggo Mortensen and director David Cronenberg plotted the unforgettable bathhouse knife fight in their new crime thriller, "Eastern Promises," Cronenberg told the actor he wanted realism and "body-ness." The director wanted to challenge his audience to really experience the intimacy of such violence. "Well, it's obvious," Mortensen told him, "I have to play this naked." Boy does he.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2007 | Susan King
According to David Cronenberg, each movie dictates how much violence it needs to depict. His movies, it seems, are quite the dictators. Over the decades, the 64-year-old Toronto-based filmmaker has stretched the R rating to its maximum with such horror fests as "Rabid," "Shivers," "Scanners," "Videodrome" and "The Fly." "When I did 'The Dead Zone,' people were saying the violence is more restrained; 'It's not like his horror films,' " Cronenberg relates.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Opera and the Theatre du Chatelet of Paris will co-produce "The Fly," a new opera based on director David Cronenberg's 1986 horror film about a scientist who mutates into a human-fly hybrid, executives of the two artistic entities are to announce today in Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2005 | Chris Lee
WHEN it came time for David Cronenberg to choose how much violence to depict in his bloody art-house thriller "A History of Violence," the director settled upon what he terms a "practical approach": Less is more. "It could not be balletic or slow-motion beautiful, and it could not feel choreographed," Cronenberg reasoned. "It would be nasty, brutish and short -- which is what the philosopher Hobbes said about life in general." In the film, which opens in Los Angeles Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2002 | John Clark, Special to The Times
David Cronenberg's newest movie, "Spider," is about a schizophrenic who is deinstitutionalized, enters a halfway house near his boyhood home and begins a downward delusional spiral that concludes with him confronting his demons. "I do identify with having one suitcase with everything in it," Cronenberg says. "I live a pretty simple life." He is referring to his nicknamed title character's threadbare existence, but it's clear the director also relates to his outsider status.
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