Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDavid Duke
IN THE NEWS

David Duke

NEWS
October 5, 1996 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Proposition 209 campaign is returning $2,300 in donations to a San Fernando Valley man who also gave political contributions to former klansman David Duke. "I just don't want the message that a David Duke supporter might bring to any cause I champion," Ward Connerly, a leader of the Proposition 209 initiative campaign, said Friday. The contributions came to light this week after Connerly said in a Sacramento debate that he would take money from anyone but Duke or those like him.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Who Is David Duke?," Hodding Carter's "Frontline" investigation of Louisiana's controversial son (at 9 tonight on KCET Channel 28 and KPBS Channel 15, and at 8 on KVCR Channel 24), glances past any predictions of what Duke will do in the fall presidential campaign, and keeps an eye on the past that made him a grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan and, now, a would-be wizard of the ultra-right. It exemplifies the strengths and weaknesses of a biographical approach to politics.
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | PETER H. KING
Of course David Duke did not come dressed in sheets. Of course he did not burn crosses on the Cal State Northridge campus. They're always more clever than that. He wore a dark suit, a bright red tie and his best winning smile. He quoted Shakespeare and recited many of the same gentle, if disingenuous, arguments for ending affirmative action put forward by proponents of Proposition 209. It was about "fairness," Duke said.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | TIM RUTTEN
David Duke has achieved at least two things I would have thought impossible just weeks ago: He has forced me to worry about Louisiana politics and made me watch the Phil Donahue show. Louisiana, of course, is the toxic waste dump of American politics, and most television talk shows are the intellectual equivalent of mud wrestling.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke predicted that the withdrawal of the Republican Party's U.S. Senate candidate would help Duke defeat incumbent Democrat J. Bennett Johnston. Both Johnston and Duke predicted an outright win in today's open primary. State Sen. Ben Bagert, the party-sanctioned Republican, withdrew Thursday. He said his polls indicated he could draw just enough votes from Johnston to force the Democrat into a Nov. 6 runoff against Duke, who is campaigning as a Republican.
NEWS
May 7, 1994 | Reuters
Former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke said Friday that he would stop using the name "Conservative Republican National Committee" in his fund-raising efforts to avoid threatened legal action by the Republican National Committee. Republican National Committee Chairman Haley Barbour sent Duke a letter Tuesday threatening to sue him for violating consumer-protection laws and to prohibit him from using the name. Barbour said the name was misleading.
NEWS
January 6, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lost track of David Duke, who first made a name for himself in the 1970s as the supposed fresh, modern face of the Ku Klux Klan? If so, his latest opus can be found here, on sale in Russia's parliament. For the past two years, the man who promised to move the Klan out of the cow pasture and into the hotel meeting room has been spending more and more time in a rented Moscow apartment, building bridges to right-wing nationalists in the new Russia.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | From Times Wire and Staff Reports
The American Civil Liberties Union went to court Tuesday to force Rhode Island's secretary of state to put former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke's name on the Republican presidential primary ballot. ACLU officials acknowledged that they are at odds with Duke on many political issues. But attorney Michael DiBiase, who filed the suit in federal court, said, "Access to the ballot is a fundamental right." The threat of a similar lawsuit last week prompted Massachusetts Secretary of State Michael J.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here in this economically ravaged town, David Duke, ex-grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, is on a roll. "I think it's time we made a statement to Washington that we're not going to take it anymore," Duke told a local truckers' association to rousing applause. "I think it's time we bring government back to the people." While such rhetoric may seem conventional, Duke is anything but.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1992 | MENACHEM Z. ROSENSAFT, Menachem Z. Rosensaft, a lawyer in New York, is the founding chairman of the International Network of Children of Jewish Holocaust Survivors. and
The most dangerous politician in the United States is not David Duke. Overt Nazis, members of the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacists are easy to isolate and discredit. In contrast, Patrick Buchanan, who also is challenging George Bush for the Republican presidential nomination, is a far more formidable threat.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|