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David Faustino

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2009 | Greg Braxton
David Faustino could barely curb his enthusiasm. After a string of personal and professional woes left the diminutive former star of Fox's "Married . . . With Children" without a career and next to broke, it seemed too good to be true: A movie studio wanted a big-screen version of the hit raunchy television series that ended in 1997.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2009 | Greg Braxton
David Faustino could barely curb his enthusiasm. After a string of personal and professional woes left the diminutive former star of Fox's "Married . . . With Children" without a career and next to broke, it seemed too good to be true: A movie studio wanted a big-screen version of the hit raunchy television series that ended in 1997.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"The Help," a new series from Ron Leavitt, the man who created "Married ... With Children" -- a show to which I would never have expected to affix the words "far superior," but so be it -- is the sort of thing that makes me feel sorry for actors. No one forces them to be actors, of course, but it does call to mind the old joke about the man who sweeps up after the circus elephants.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"The Help," a new series from Ron Leavitt, the man who created "Married ... With Children" -- a show to which I would never have expected to affix the words "far superior," but so be it -- is the sort of thing that makes me feel sorry for actors. No one forces them to be actors, of course, but it does call to mind the old joke about the man who sweeps up after the circus elephants.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | KEVIN ALLMAN
You pay your $10, you sit in a room with women wearing black clothes and men wearing ponytails, and you listen to television stars read their innermost thoughts in blank verse. You are at one of L.A.'s currently popular (make that inexplicably popular) celebrity poetry readings. You experience a deep feeling of nausea. Can these people possibly take themselves seriously?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
It's hard to tell at first what's going through Jaleel White's mind as he picks up the new "Family Matters" DVD box set. Front and center is a picture of a young Jaleel, decked out in oversized glasses, suspenders and braces, flashing a geeky smile. As White gazes at the image of himself as Steve Urkel, the ultra-nerd with the high-pitched voice and snorty laugh who became the most popular character of the ABC comedy about a middle-class African American family, his mouth tightens.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2012 | By Robert Ito
In "How to Train Your Dragon," the 2010 film from DreamWorks Animation, a skinny viking teen named Hiccup discovers that dragons can be taught and tamed, a lot like dogs, except that these dogs are 30 feet across and breathe fire. By the end of the film, vikings and dragons, who began the movie trying to brain each other, are best pals. As with so many other stories of star-crossed, interspecies pairings, from "The Adventures of Milo and Otis" to "Avatar," one wonders just where this relationship will go. That question is answered in the new animated series "Dragons: Riders of Berk," which is being produced by DreamWorks Animation for Cartoon Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2003 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
It's a funny thing about watching a great comedy show: The top-notch performers can make it appear so effortless that it seems as if anyone could do it. But as tonight's 8 p.m. premiere of the ABC Family series "My Life Is a Sitcom" makes so excruciatingly clear, TV is definitely not for everyone. And certainly not for the Mozian clan of Old Greenwich, Conn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Ron Leavitt, a veteran television writer and producer best known for co-creating "Married . . . With Children," the raunchy, groundbreaking sitcom that helped put the fledgling Fox network on the map in the late 1980s, has died. He was 60. Leavitt died of lung cancer Sunday at his home in Sherman Oaks, said publicist Larry Winokur. Ed O'Neill, who played Al Bundy on the show, told The Times on Monday that Leavitt was "one of the funniest guys I ever knew. " "He had a very original way of thinking in terms of comedy," O'Neill said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
CBS' "Schoolbreak Specials," hourlong films dramatizing pertinent teen issues, are generally well done within the limitations of the format, but sheer fun isn't one of their usual ingredients. That's what makes today's delectable offering, "Words Up!" (3 p.m. on Channels 2 and 8), such a surprise. Kadeem Hardison ("A Different World") stars as Henry, an illiterate 25-year-old high school dropout who can't hang onto a job.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Garry Shandling will return to host "The 33rd Annual Grammy Awards," airing Feb. 20 at 9 p.m. on CBS. This is Shandling's second consecutive year hosting the awards, which honor excellence in the recording industry. The Gramms will be broadcast live--seen on tape-delay in California--from Radio City Music Hall in New York City. Country artists Clint Black, Kathy Mattea and George Strait will host "The 26th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards" special, airing April 24 at 9 p.m. on NBC.
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