Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDavid H Souter
IN THE NEWS

David H Souter

OPINION
May 7, 2009 | Akhil Reed Amar and Ian Ayres, Akhil Reed Amar and Ian Ayres are professors at Yale Law School and the authors, respectively, of "America's Constitution: A Biography" and "Why Not?"
As if President Obama did not have enough on his plate! He will soon need to nominate a Supreme Court justice to replace David H. Souter, who intends to retire. While Obama is at it -- and to make things easier next time around -- perhaps he should consider nominating a second justice now, to fill whatever vacancy might arise after Souter's departure. Souter's formal letter to Obama indicates that he will step down at the end of this term -- presumably late June.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Tuesday knocked down one of the pillars of constitutional law--that a coerced confession never can be used against an accused person in court. From now on, courts will not automatically overturn the convictions of defendants who were pressured by police officers into admitting their guilt. If there is enough additional evidence to justify the guilty verdict, the conviction will stand. The ruling came on a 5-4 vote in an opinion by Chief Justice William H.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although few senators had ever heard of David H. Souter before Monday, early signs were favorable that his nomination to the Supreme Court would be approved by the Senate. A big plus for him is the strong backing of widely respected Sen. Warren B. Rudman (R-N.H.), who helped bring Souter to President Bush's attention and lavished praise on his longtime friend throughout the Capitol.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Supreme Court nominee David H. Souter made the traditional courtesy calls on Senate leaders Wednesday as Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh warned Democrats that probing the nominee about his views on specific issues "verged on the improper." Responding to questions after a speech at the National Press Club, Thornburgh also hinted that Souter may not respond to inquiries regarding his opinions on controversial cases likely to face the high court.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2005 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
When Tina Pelletier opened the mail at Town Hall the other day, a check for $100 fell out. Someone from out of state wanted to make reservations at Weare's first hotel. But the bed-and-breakfast envisioned on a remote site at the end of a dirt road is little more than a political activist's pipedream. The eight-acre parcel is still owned -- although seldom occupied -- by U.S. Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2006 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Just after 9 a.m. Saturday, Brenda Lashway knocked on the door of a burly cable company technician named Bart Eltz. Wearing a "Beer Hunter" T-shirt, Eltz looked puzzled when Lashway asked if he was familiar with the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Kelo vs. the City of New London. "Well," Lashway explained, "the way it reads now, our property can be taken from us for essentially any use at all."
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
In selecting a respected but little-known jurist with almost no track record on the explosive issue of abortion, President Bush has substantially reduced the risk of a bitter election-year battle over his choice to succeed retired Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan Jr. While nothing can guarantee that the nominee--former New Hampshire Supreme Court Justice David H.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court opens its fall term Monday facing a looming question: Will it finally have a true conservative majority? For the first time since 1956, the justices will take the bench without William J. Brennan Jr., the architect of the liberal court that a generation of Americans came to know.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the end, the decision came down to two candidates and one issue. The candidates were David H. Souter of New Hampshire and Edith H. Jones of Texas. And the issue, according to officials involved in the process of picking the next justice of the Supreme Court, was not abortion, but politics--did President Bush want an ideological war or a smooth, non-disruptive confirmation process. The 68-hour-long process of picking a successor to retired Justice William J. Brennan Jr.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS and ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Both sides on the volatile abortion issue began to position themselves Tuesday for the upcoming confirmation hearings on the nomination of Judge David H. Souter to the Supreme Court. Anti-abortion forces were choosing to maintain a low profile, but abortion rights advocates plan to try to persuade the Senate Judiciary Committee to question Souter closely on his position on the issue.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|