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David Houk

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BUSINESS
October 30, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
A prime development site overlooking Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles is being sold to a San Francisco developer. The pending sale to MacFarlane Partners marks the end of Park Fifth, one of the most ambitious real estate projects ever proposed in downtown Los Angeles, and the dawn of another, less grand, development. In 2007, plans for a $1-billion residential and hotel complex were announced by Los Angeles developer David Houk, who had owned land at the northeast corner of 5th and Olive streets for decades.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
A prime development site overlooking Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles is being sold to a San Francisco developer. The pending sale to MacFarlane Partners marks the end of Park Fifth, one of the most ambitious real estate projects ever proposed in downtown Los Angeles, and the dawn of another, less grand, development. In 2007, plans for a $1-billion residential and hotel complex were announced by Los Angeles developer David Houk, who had owned land at the northeast corner of 5th and Olive streets for decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1996
Re Laurie Winer's review of "Camping With Henry and Tom," (" 'Camping' Casts Little Light on the American Psyche," July 23). I realize I can do little about the judgments of critics, but I do believe they have an obligation to report the facts to the public. Among many other critical achievements, "Camping With Henry and Tom," by Mark St. Germain, won the 1995 Outer Critics' Circle and Lucille Lortel awards for best off-Broadway play. Winer is entitled to her opinion but why does she neglect to tell the Los Angeles theater-going community that she is reviewing a multi-award-winning production?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1996
Re Laurie Winer's review of "Camping With Henry and Tom," (" 'Camping' Casts Little Light on the American Psyche," July 23). I realize I can do little about the judgments of critics, but I do believe they have an obligation to report the facts to the public. Among many other critical achievements, "Camping With Henry and Tom," by Mark St. Germain, won the 1995 Outer Critics' Circle and Lucille Lortel awards for best off-Broadway play. Winer is entitled to her opinion but why does she neglect to tell the Los Angeles theater-going community that she is reviewing a multi-award-winning production?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Theatre Corp. of America has withdrawn from managing the Alex Theatre in Glendale, leaving 10,000 subscribers to its current three-musical series uncertain about how their remaining tickets will be honored. Theatre Corp. president David Houk said his company could not afford to produce the last two shows in the current series, but he said he would help the Alex Regional Theatre Board--the city-appointed panel that oversees the recently restored theater--find replacements for them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Wanna kick off 1985 in style? Have we got a theater for you! The Los Angeles Metropolitan Community Church building at 1050 S. Hill St. downtown is for sale. In an earlier incarnation, it was none other than the Belasco Theatre--then and now a jewel of a proscenium house. Built in 1926 (a very good year for new theaters), it was described by Times Theater Critic Edwin Schallert on its opening night as "architecturally satisfying . . . rich and replete with an old gold luxuriance . . .
NEWS
November 14, 1985 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
After almost 20 years in darkness and debt, the refurbished Pasadena Playhouse is facing a dubious future as deadlines near for what would be its first season since 1966. The once-famous theater, whose school produced some of America's great performers, may still be dark on Dec. 1, the date scheduled for opening a full season of performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY
Have shows, will travel. That could be Pasadena Playhouse owner David Houk's motto as he scours the Southland, looking for theaters to add to his proposed circuit for Pasadena productions. Houk is making bids to operate--and perhaps to own--theaters in Culver City and Riverside. He's sniffing for sites in Orange County and Santa Barbara. And, as previously reported, he has his eye on the Balboa and Spreckels theaters in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2007 | Lynne Heffley
Former Pasadena Playhouse owner and local real estate developer David Houk has partnered with Robert Abassi of RTI Properties to purchase the Variety Arts Center in downtown Los Angeles from Staples Center owner Anschutz Entertainment Group. The historic Figueroa Street venue, which includes a 1,000-seat main theater, will open after an estimated yearlong renovation of the property that will "hopefully begin within 60 or 90 days," Houk said this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1998
The Pasadena Playhouse is for sale, following a bankruptcy filing by owners, the firm's managing general partner said Thursday. David Houk said Pasadena Playhouse Associates must sell the playhouse buildings and adjoining office complex to repay creditors under a Chapter 11 bankruptcy filed last month. City officials said the property taxes on the facility are unpaid. The theater is being leased by the nonprofit Pasadena Playhouse State Theatre of California, which stages its own productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Theatre Corp. of America has withdrawn from managing the Alex Theatre in Glendale, leaving 10,000 subscribers to its current three-musical series uncertain about how their remaining tickets will be honored. Theatre Corp. president David Houk said his company could not afford to produce the last two shows in the current series, but he said he would help the Alex Regional Theatre Board--the city-appointed panel that oversees the recently restored theater--find replacements for them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY
Have shows, will travel. That could be Pasadena Playhouse owner David Houk's motto as he scours the Southland, looking for theaters to add to his proposed circuit for Pasadena productions. Houk is making bids to operate--and perhaps to own--theaters in Culver City and Riverside. He's sniffing for sites in Orange County and Santa Barbara. And, as previously reported, he has his eye on the Balboa and Spreckels theaters in San Diego.
NEWS
November 14, 1985 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
After almost 20 years in darkness and debt, the refurbished Pasadena Playhouse is facing a dubious future as deadlines near for what would be its first season since 1966. The once-famous theater, whose school produced some of America's great performers, may still be dark on Dec. 1, the date scheduled for opening a full season of performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Wanna kick off 1985 in style? Have we got a theater for you! The Los Angeles Metropolitan Community Church building at 1050 S. Hill St. downtown is for sale. In an earlier incarnation, it was none other than the Belasco Theatre--then and now a jewel of a proscenium house. Built in 1926 (a very good year for new theaters), it was described by Times Theater Critic Edwin Schallert on its opening night as "architecturally satisfying . . . rich and replete with an old gold luxuriance . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2002 | Don Shirley
El Portal Theatre in North Hollywood will become the home of Playhouse Pictures Studios, a company that plans to produce scripts as plays on the 360-seat El Portal main stage and then develop them into modestly budgeted feature films, company officials have announced. The company will be run by a trio consisting of former Pasadena Playhouse owner David Houk, former Landmark Entertainment chief financial officer Ronny Angel and agent and entertainment attorney Lee Muhl.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
El Portal Center for the Arts--the nonprofit that leased North Hollywood's El Portal Theatre--is insolvent because of debts that may reach as high as $3 million, stemming from the organization's conversion of the 1926 movie palace into a live performance center during the last decade, according to former board members. But the organization's programming will continue under different auspices.
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