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David Katz

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SPORTS
January 30, 1991 | CHRIS FOSTER
Swimming Anaheim Age 14 David Katz got an early start on his swimming career. His memories of it are a little vague, but at the age of 3 months, he made his first big splash in the sport. When he was an infant, David's mother, Carol Katz, took him to a YMCA in Philadelphia for a water safety class. While they were in the pool, David suddenly pushed free from his mother's grasp and began swimming under water. "The people who were teaching the class were stunned," Carol Katz said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Philip Seymour Hoffman died of an accidental overdose involving a powerful cocktail of drugs, authorities announced Friday. Heroin, cocaine, benzodiazepines and amphetamine were found in the actor's system, causing "acute drug intoxication," according to the report from New York's Office of Chief Medical Examiner. Hoffman's body was found Feb. 2 in the bathroom of his New York apartment with a syringe still in his forearm, so confirmation of an overdose wasn't unexpected, though the details shed some further light on the extent of the actor's drug use. Taking heroin with cocaine is known as "speedballing," which also killed stars John Belushi and River Phoenix.
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NEWS
January 30, 1996 | DAVE McKIBBEN
Katz's second swimming career wasn't nearly as successful as his first. Though he became a Times' all-county swimmer his senior year at Foothill, Katz didn't set any national records this time around. He set four with the Mission Viejo Nadadores as a youngster. "I found myself going from first to second to third to eighth and then to consolation races," Katz said. "I knew I had to start looking at swimming a whole new way." Carol Katz said her son simply outgrew the water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2003 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
David Katz's day at the Van Nuys courthouse started like any other Friday. The Traffic Court judge spent the morning hearing cases, as he always does. After clearing his calendar a little after 10, he headed toward the parking lot to leave. But as he neared his car, he heard shots. The next few minutes would force change on his routine and thrust him into the media klieg lights-- at least temporarily. A short distance away, a shoving match had quickly escalated.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Philip Seymour Hoffman died of an accidental overdose involving a powerful cocktail of drugs, authorities announced Friday. Heroin, cocaine, benzodiazepines and amphetamine were found in the actor's system, causing "acute drug intoxication," according to the report from New York's Office of Chief Medical Examiner. Hoffman's body was found Feb. 2 in the bathroom of his New York apartment with a syringe still in his forearm, so confirmation of an overdose wasn't unexpected, though the details shed some further light on the extent of the actor's drug use. Taking heroin with cocaine is known as "speedballing," which also killed stars John Belushi and River Phoenix.
NEWS
May 21, 1986
Glass salesman Kerry Lynn Brown pleaded innocent to first-degree murder in the slaying of a postal worker. Trial of Brown, 25, held without bail, will begin July 1, U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon said. Brown was arrested April 26 in the death of Dale J. Hooker, 39, who was shot while delivering mail to the Los Angeles home where Brown lived with his parents. A medical examination to determine if Brown were fit for trial was requested by Assistant U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2003 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
David Katz's day at the Van Nuys courthouse started like any other Friday. The Traffic Court judge spent the morning hearing cases, as he always does. After clearing his calendar a little after 10, he headed toward the parking lot to leave. But as he neared his car, he heard shots. The next few minutes would force change on his routine and thrust him into the media klieg lights-- at least temporarily. A short distance away, a shoving match had quickly escalated.
BOOKS
January 2, 2000 | MARTIN MALIA, Martin Malia is the author of "The Soviet Tragedy: A History of Socialism in Russia, 1917-1991" and "Russia Under Western Eyes: From the Bronze Horseman to the Lenin Mausoleum." He is professor emeritus of history at UC Berkeley
With the advent of the second millennium now safely behind us (that is, unless one accepts the more correct dating of the new era from 2001), perhaps the salient fact about the great moment was its insignificance. Not only was there no sign of millennial panic, but the most notable indication of fixation on the transition was not spiritual but carnal: All the world's best restaurants had been booked solid for years for the evening of Dec. 31.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
For Dr. Antronette K. Yancey, a UCLA public health professor, exercise could be fun and done in short bursts in the workplace, schools and even places of worship. Her campaign to urge people to incorporate physical activity into their daily lives led to a 2010 book about the topic - "Instant Recess: Building a Fit Nation 10 Minutes at a Time. " Long before First Lady Michelle Obama launched a national conversation on physical fitness, Yancey was talking about the dangers of a sedentary lifestyle and the benefits of exercise, colleagues said.
BOOKS
January 2, 2000 | MARTIN MALIA, Martin Malia is the author of "The Soviet Tragedy: A History of Socialism in Russia, 1917-1991" and "Russia Under Western Eyes: From the Bronze Horseman to the Lenin Mausoleum." He is professor emeritus of history at UC Berkeley
With the advent of the second millennium now safely behind us (that is, unless one accepts the more correct dating of the new era from 2001), perhaps the salient fact about the great moment was its insignificance. Not only was there no sign of millennial panic, but the most notable indication of fixation on the transition was not spiritual but carnal: All the world's best restaurants had been booked solid for years for the evening of Dec. 31.
NEWS
January 30, 1996 | DAVE McKIBBEN
Katz's second swimming career wasn't nearly as successful as his first. Though he became a Times' all-county swimmer his senior year at Foothill, Katz didn't set any national records this time around. He set four with the Mission Viejo Nadadores as a youngster. "I found myself going from first to second to third to eighth and then to consolation races," Katz said. "I knew I had to start looking at swimming a whole new way." Carol Katz said her son simply outgrew the water.
SPORTS
January 30, 1991 | CHRIS FOSTER
Swimming Anaheim Age 14 David Katz got an early start on his swimming career. His memories of it are a little vague, but at the age of 3 months, he made his first big splash in the sport. When he was an infant, David's mother, Carol Katz, took him to a YMCA in Philadelphia for a water safety class. While they were in the pool, David suddenly pushed free from his mother's grasp and began swimming under water. "The people who were teaching the class were stunned," Carol Katz said.
NEWS
May 21, 1986
Glass salesman Kerry Lynn Brown pleaded innocent to first-degree murder in the slaying of a postal worker. Trial of Brown, 25, held without bail, will begin July 1, U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon said. Brown was arrested April 26 in the death of Dale J. Hooker, 39, who was shot while delivering mail to the Los Angeles home where Brown lived with his parents. A medical examination to determine if Brown were fit for trial was requested by Assistant U.S. Atty.
NEWS
November 4, 1986
Another defendant has been indicted on charges of mail fraud in a $3-million phone solicitation scheme, the U.S. attorney's office announced Monday. Michael Bruce Marks, 47, and seven others are accused in two federal Grand Jury indictments of using deceptive sales pitches to market photocopier supplies from a "boiler room" sales office in Los Angeles. All the defendants are free on bail pending trial Dec. 2, Assistant U.S. Atty. David Katz said.
FOOD
September 15, 1994 | DAN BERGER
Winemaker Angelo Papagni, who pled guilty two years ago to falsely selling Barbera Grapes as Zinfandel and was sentenced to 18 months in federal prison, has had his prison term reduced by three months, making him eligible for release this week. Los Angeles attorney David Katz appealed to U.S.
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