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David Koresh

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NEWS
June 6, 1993 | from Times Wire Services
Branch Davidian cult leader David Koresh was buried in an unmarked grave during a quiet ceremony on May 27, his mother said. "It was a very small affair," said Koresh's mother, Bonnie Haldeman. "Only close family members were told. We did not want the publicity of a funeral or anything else. There were no clergy there. David would not have wanted a traditional funeral."
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NEWS
July 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
Unidentified Branch Davidians were heard asking, "Start the fire?" and "Should we light the fire?" in tapes played Monday in the $675-million wrongful-death trial against the government. U.S. District Judge Walter Smith, a panel of five jurors and attorneys listened to nearly an hour of mostly unintelligible conversations leading up to April 19, 1993, when the compound burned to the ground.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1994 | Steve Hochman
Now that the furor has died down over Guns N' Roses' recording a song written by Charles Manson, is the pop world ready for an album of recordings by . . . David Koresh? "Voice of Fire," just released by the small, Iowa-based Junior's Motel label, features a sampling of the music and oratory of the late Branch Davidian cult leader. The CD cover shows a drawing of Koresh engulfed in flames--a clear reference to the fiery conclusion of his Waco, Tex., standoff last year with federal agents.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Branch Davidian leader David Koresh wanted semiautomatic weapons converted into machine guns and grew more militant in the months before government agents attempted to raid the cult's compound, a former member testified. In a deposition read by government attorneys in a Waco court, Donald Bunds said he made the parts but did not know if a complete gun was constructed. Koresh considered the government an enemy and often spoke about a violent end of the world, he said. On Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She has played the lead in "Annie" at the Orange County Performing Arts Center and Dorothy in a musical "Wizard of Oz" on stage in San Diego and Pasadena, but in her first role in a major TV movie, Adrienne Stiefel finds she's not in Kansas anymore. The Laguna Hills teen plays one of the Branch Davidian cult members under the sway of David Koresh (played by Tim Daly of "Wings") in "In the Line of Duty: Ambush in Waco," which airs Sunday at 9 p.m. on NBC.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | TIM REITERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Do you want me to pull back the heavens and show you my anger?" --David Koresh under siege "I don't mind losing my life. What about you? . . . I'd just as soon bring it to a gallant, glorious screaming end." --Jim Jones to his followers This time it was fire. Last time it was a cyanide potion. Though separated by nearly 15 years and thousands of miles, Jonestown, Guyana, and Waco, Tex.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | STEPHEN BRAUN, This story was reported by Times staff writers J. Michael Kennedy, Louis Sahagun, Ronald J. Ostrow, Robert L. Jackson and Stephen Braun. It was written by Braun
In the end, the yawning gulf between federal authorities and David Koresh proved unbridgeable in almost every imaginable respect. The gap widened even in death. How exactly did Koresh and his followers perish in the blaze that incinerated their fortified Ranch Apocalypse compound?
NEWS
April 20, 1993 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a fiery ending as apocalyptic as the prophecies he issued, religious cult leader David Koresh and scores of his followers were immolated within the buff-pink walls of his Texas prairie compound Monday in a blaze that believers reportedly set after federal agents smashed into the walls with an armored vehicle. Only nine of the 95 people believed to be inside the Branch Davidian compound escaped, some of them suffering from burns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1993
News flash: After one year David Koresh and his followers are deciding still whether to come out or not. Lawyers are still negotiating. Authorities remain patient. Taxpayers continue to cringe! LARRY BAKOS Encino
NEWS
April 20, 1993 | Associated Press
President Clinton's statement Monday about events at the cult compound in Waco, Tex.: "I am deeply saddened by the loss of life in Waco today. My thoughts and prayers are with the families of David Koresh's victims. "The law enforcement agencies involved in the Waco siege recommended the course of action pursued today.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years after the conflagration at Mount Carmel, the lingering questions over what exactly happened at the Branch Davidian compound are about to fall under the national microscope once again. This time, the U.S. government is on trial.
BOOKS
January 2, 2000 | DAVID S. KATZ, David S. Katz is the author (with Richard H. Popkin) of "Messianic Revolution: Radical Religious Politics to the End of the Second Millennium." He is a professor of history at Tel-Aviv University in Israel
Traditional fundamentalist theology speaks of a seven-year period of "tribulation," after which time mankind will witness the Second Coming of Christ. It has been almost seven years since the Branch Davidian "compound" burned to the ground in central Texas on April 19, 1993, killing 74 people, including 21 children, and once again messianic violence is raising its ugly head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1999
I find it hard to believe that Atty. Gen. Janet Reno was unaware that the FBI used flammable munitions in the last hours of the Waco tragedy (Aug. 26-27). She now states that she is shocked to hear that the FBI kept this information from her and the citizens of this country. If the attorney general of the land did not know what was going on, she is unfit for her job. As I remember, she stated after the tragedy that she took full responsibility for actions that were taken during the Waco siege.
BOOKS
August 13, 1995 | Michael D'Antonio, Author Michael D'Antonio has written extensively on religious movements in America. His next book, "Devouring the Young: Parents, Politics and the Decline of America's Children," is due in 1996 from Crown Publishing
Recent Congressional hearings on the Waco tragedy are supposed to help the nation understand what happened on the Texas plains in 1993, when about 80 people died during government raids on a heavily armed "cult compound." A 14-year-old girl's testimony of sexual abuse inside the compound explains, in part, the decision to arrest the people known as Branch Davidians and their leader, David Koresh. And the tales of incompetence and machismo told by some of the agents who participated in the raid illustrate the mistakes made by those who directed the two disastrous assaults.
NEWS
July 29, 1995 | DAVID WILLMAN and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Experts told a congressional panel Friday that the fire that leveled the Branch Davidian compound near Waco, Tex., two years ago was deliberately set by members of the religious sect. The testimony came on the same day that a survivor of the inferno recalled vividly the death screams of his fellow Davidians. Two experts who testified based their conclusions largely on videotapes and on their fire-scene investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1995 | From The Washington Post
Congressional hearings on the Branch Davidian siege are raising thorny questions about whether the government owes unconventional and insular religious sects as much religious freedom as that granted more mainstream faiths. Many religion scholars see the Waco case as a colossal government failure to balance a group's 1st Amendment rights to practice its faith freely with the government's imperative to intervene when it suspects laws are being broken.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Children in the Branch Davidian cult compound say they were paddled for trifling sins, told to call their parents "dogs" and sexually abused by cult leader David Koresh, a newspaper reported. The children, who left the compound during the 51-day siege by federal agents, told social workers that Koresh gave girls as young as 11 plastic Stars of David that signified they were ready to have sex with him, the New York Times reported. A team headed by Dr. Bruce D.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A man who had slipped past federal agents and into the besieged Branch Davidian cult compound walked out again, a spokesman for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms said in Waco. Louis Alaniz, 24, of Houston, left the fortified complex and was taken to the McLennan County Jail, the spokesman said. He entered the compound March 24, seeking religious teachings from cult leader David Koresh. Koresh and more than 90 followers have been barricaded in the compound since a Feb.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | GLENN F. BUNTING and DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, confronting new questions about her handling of the deadly 1993 disaster near Waco, Tex., said Thursday in a news conference that she relied on FBI assurances that negotiations with cult leader David Koresh could not succeed before approving a controversial tear gas assault. Reno's understanding of the view held two years ago by Byron A. Sage, the FBI's chief negotiator at Waco, contrasts with Sage's testimony before a congressional hearing this week.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | DAVID WILLMAN and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Disputing criticism that they acted in haste, FBI officials who supervised the deadly siege of a cult compound near Waco, Tex., testified Wednesday that they gave little credence to a surrender plan proposed by sect leader David Koresh's lawyer five days before a final assault on the complex. The officials said they saw no need in mid-April, 1993, to relay the proposed surrender to Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, who was about to approve the use of tear gas to force out the Branch Davidians.
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