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David Milch

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At first hearing, it sounds like an instant entry in the history of bad ideas: Take one of literature's most confounding, Baroque and at times abstract novelists and turn his books into TV, a medium that honors the literal and straightforward. And do it — probably at great expense — over and over again. On closer inspection, the pairing of David Milch — whose "Deadwood" and "NYPD Blue" took television about as close to art film as it's likely to get — with William Faulkner, author of some of the most profound and important American novels — may be so crazy it could actually work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
When Nic Pizzolatto was 5, he had an epiphany. It wasn't the usual childhood one about finger-painting or bike-riding or other regular kid stuff. It was that one day he would die. "You know how people say that young people feel immortal? I don't know what they're talking about," he said. "I was planning for how I would deal with my death in good conscience well before I even hit puberty. " The moment captures Pizzolatto, one of the more colorful creative types to emerge in Hollywood in recent years and the force behind HBO's "True Detective," the Louisiana-set, time-jumping Matthew McConaughey-Woody Harrelson noir series that premieres Sunday.
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SPORTS
December 25, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Writer-producer David Milch has captured the attention of America with his crime dramas "Hill Street Blues," and "NYPD Blue," and he brought an uncensored version of the Old West to HBO's "Deadwood" too. The difference in Milch's coming HBO series, "Luck," is that while he researched his former projects, he has lived through the experiences of being both a degenerate horse player and an occupant in a thoroughbred owner's box. He has owned...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The unexpected death of James Gandolfini, who was best known for his work on the series "The Sopranos," recently re-ignited the conversation over How Much Television has Changed, which has become so intense and widespread in the last few years that books are now being written about it. Last year, critic Alan Sepinwall self-published "The Revolution Was Televised: The Cops, Crooks, Slingers, and Slayers Who Changed TV Drama Forever" to such attention it...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY
Writing tends to be a solitary occupation for most and an occupation, in the truest sense, for precious few. It is not the sort of activity that easily lends itself to "how-to" displays or in-depth analysis on the order of Bravo's "Inside the Actors Studio."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fans of "NYPD Blue" may feel as if they've been getting an extra dose of "ER" the last few weeks, watching the police drama delve into heart problems plaguing Det. Bobby Simone, played by departing star Jimmy Smits. For executive producer David Milch, that plot invokes both memories as well as strong feelings about the medical field, which Milch witnessed on an up-close-and-personal basis.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1998 | Brian Lowry, Brian Lowry is a Times staff writer
Having struggled with addiction, he remains thoroughly committed to his work and family, while still grappling with his own inner demons. While that description fits Andy Sipowicz, the gruff detective on ABC's "NYPD Blue," it also applies to the man who helped create him. David Milch, "NYPD Blue's" co-creator and executive producer, has lived a life nearly as colorful as any of his characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
When Nic Pizzolatto was 5, he had an epiphany. It wasn't the usual childhood one about finger-painting or bike-riding or other regular kid stuff. It was that one day he would die. "You know how people say that young people feel immortal? I don't know what they're talking about," he said. "I was planning for how I would deal with my death in good conscience well before I even hit puberty. " The moment captures Pizzolatto, one of the more colorful creative types to emerge in Hollywood in recent years and the force behind HBO's "True Detective," the Louisiana-set, time-jumping Matthew McConaughey-Woody Harrelson noir series that premieres Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2006 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
IF David Milch had his druthers, he probably wouldn't be strapped into a twin-prop plane at 10:30 on a Saturday morning, his aching back braced with a pillow as the aircraft scythes through the Central Valley haze. Milch, after all, has plenty of other claims on his time: projects to plan, Emmy Award-winning TV scripts to churn out.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At first hearing, it sounds like an instant entry in the history of bad ideas: Take one of literature's most confounding, Baroque and at times abstract novelists and turn his books into TV, a medium that honors the literal and straightforward. And do it — probably at great expense — over and over again. On closer inspection, the pairing of David Milch — whose "Deadwood" and "NYPD Blue" took television about as close to art film as it's likely to get — with William Faulkner, author of some of the most profound and important American novels — may be so crazy it could actually work.
SPORTS
December 25, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Writer-producer David Milch has captured the attention of America with his crime dramas "Hill Street Blues," and "NYPD Blue," and he brought an uncensored version of the Old West to HBO's "Deadwood" too. The difference in Milch's coming HBO series, "Luck," is that while he researched his former projects, he has lived through the experiences of being both a degenerate horse player and an occupant in a thoroughbred owner's box. He has owned...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2011 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
Anyone who has been to Santa Anita in the early morning hours knows it is a place of poetry and pathos. Those time-weathered men, their eyes lined in mutual squint, gathered in sacramental silence to watch the horses move by, haloed by steam and sending dirt up in clods rich and dark; the sound of the hooves is like the beating pulse of the Earth itself. But how to tell the story of such a place without lapsing into overworked extremes, the sentiment of bond between human and horse, the simplistic adrenaline of a champion's tale, the heartbreak of gambling's larcenous core?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
David Milch is the last guy I'd figure to bring back "Touched by an Angel," but I was well into Episode 2 of his new HBO series "John From Cincinnati" and running out of options. What is this? The network is introducing the show Sunday night, after the finale of "The Sopranos." To start a series featuring a frothing, discursive, junkie surfer five seconds after the most important series in HBO's history ends is an understandable programming decision but also a kind of madness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2007 | Lynn Smith
"JOHN" stars plenty of familiar faces -- Rebecca De Mornay ("Risky Business," "Wedding Crashers") and Bruce Greenwood ("I, Robot") play the volatile, verbal grandparents Mitch and Cissy Yost; Brian Van Holt ("Black Hawk Down") is their son, Butchie; Ed O'Neill ("Married With Children") plays family friend Bill; Austin Nichols ("The Day After Tomorrow," "Deadwood") plays the supernatural stranger John.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
LAST year, it was known as "the show they canceled 'Deadwood' for." Now, some say it's "the show that could replace 'The Sopranos.' " Expectations are running so high in some quarters for David Milch's multilayered surf family saga, "John From Cincinnati," launching next Sunday, its creators don't even want to discuss them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1992
"The reasons that critics and highbrows bemoan the repetitiveness and the absence of innovation in television and in other forms of popular art is precisely because they misunderstand the desire of the viewer for the familiar. There's a reassurance in seeing something where you know how it's going to come out." --TV writer-producer David Milch, in the Journal of the Writers Guild of America, West.
NEWS
May 24, 2007 | Paul Brownfield
"JOHN From Cincinnati" has the ingredients of something you've gotta see at least once: surfers, aliens, drug addicts, all brought together by David Milch, the prolific, risk-taking TV dramatist who decided to wrap up his HBO western "Deadwood" to do this new project. It's Milch's mind that's probably going to be the star here; the series' "name" actors include Bruce Greenwood and Rebecca De Mornay.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
THE collaboration between novelist Kem Nunn and "Deadwood" creator David Milch might have seemed odd at first. Milch, 62, raised in Buffalo, N.Y., taught literature at Yale. His knowledge of surfers was limited to his brief adventures into the '60s West Coast drug scene. A former heroin addict now eight years sober, he is famously compulsive, intellectual and social, improvising scripts on set.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2007 | Lynn Smith
WHEN the angry, drug-addicted Butchie Yost, one of the main characters of "John From Cincinnati," starts hanging out with the mysterious John, his problems begin to dissipate. The arc of a man, dead to the world, who starts to live again is a familiar one in Kem Nunn's novels -- and in David Milch's life. Milch, 62, has described a childhood tormented by an adored surgeon father who beat him and later committed suicide.
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