Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDavid Quammen
IN THE NEWS

David Quammen

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 13, 1998 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I have the biases of a literary journalist," writes David Quammen in this, his eighth book, "working in that great gray zone between newspaper reporting and fiction, engaged every day in trying to make facts not just talk but yodel." Readers familiar with Quammen's "The Song of the Dodo," a stimulating 1996 study of island biogeography, know that he can make facts yodel.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On an Amazon expedition described in a charming essay in "The Boilerplate Rhino," David Quammen, along with a tropical biologist and a foundation executive, is sitting naked in an outdoor bathing place at dusk. Darkness falls, as it does near the Equator, with, as Quammen says, a "whump." And then, suddenly: "A large glob of orange light comes zigzagging through the trees. It moves slowly, flying a gracefully sinuous path, as though under command of Steven Spielberg.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | CHRISTY PORTER, Porter is a free-lance writer in Spokane, Wash.
Circling crows appear like smudges on the pale winter sky, occasionally swooping to peck at frozen road-kill. The last few miles on Highway 15 from Helena to the Butte stockyards are harsh and not that pretty. At the yard, Ralph Beer struggles against a 1,200-pound cow and the cold wind until the animal is finally in the auction stall. Then Beer lights a cigarette, perches on a rickety fence gate and muses on the state of literature in Montana.
NEWS
February 13, 1998 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I have the biases of a literary journalist," writes David Quammen in this, his eighth book, "working in that great gray zone between newspaper reporting and fiction, engaged every day in trying to make facts not just talk but yodel." Readers familiar with Quammen's "The Song of the Dodo," a stimulating 1996 study of island biogeography, know that he can make facts yodel.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | LEE DEMBART
The Flight of the Iguana: A Sidelong View of Science and Nature by David Quammen (Delacorte Press: $17.95; 302 pages) A couple of months ago in this space I commented favorably on "The Man With No Endorphins" by James Gorman, a collection of funny, off-beat articles about science that had originally appeared in Discover magazine.
BOOKS
July 23, 1989
Hats off to Peter S. Greenberg, who in his July 8 article, "How Tourism and the Environment Are Colliding," hinted at the self-contradictions of the tourism industry. The article makes clear that too much of a good thing isn't. Nowhere is this better illustrated than in the case of tourism. Tourism is a vital part of the economy for both developing and industrialized countries. However, sometimes the country and visitors to it suffer as a result of too much promotion.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On an Amazon expedition described in a charming essay in "The Boilerplate Rhino," David Quammen, along with a tropical biologist and a foundation executive, is sitting naked in an outdoor bathing place at dusk. Darkness falls, as it does near the Equator, with, as Quammen says, a "whump." And then, suddenly: "A large glob of orange light comes zigzagging through the trees. It moves slowly, flying a gracefully sinuous path, as though under command of Steven Spielberg.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David Quammen likes to write about "small, peculiar facts connected to large ideas." That's what he did in the science column he wrote for 15 years in Outside magazine. And that's what he's done in his new book, "The Song of the Dodo" (Scribner). This time, Quammen got the small, peculiar fact for it before he got the large idea. "About 10 years ago I read a newspaper story . . . about the extinction of native birds on the island of Guam," he said.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David Quammen likes to write about "small, peculiar facts connected to large ideas." That's what he did in the science column he wrote for 15 years in Outside magazine. And that's what he's done in his new book, "The Song of the Dodo" (Scribner). This time, Quammen got the small, peculiar fact for it before he got the large idea. "About 10 years ago I read a newspaper story . . . about the extinction of native birds on the island of Guam," he said.
BOOKS
July 23, 1989
Hats off to Peter S. Greenberg, who in his July 8 article, "How Tourism and the Environment Are Colliding," hinted at the self-contradictions of the tourism industry. The article makes clear that too much of a good thing isn't. Nowhere is this better illustrated than in the case of tourism. Tourism is a vital part of the economy for both developing and industrialized countries. However, sometimes the country and visitors to it suffer as a result of too much promotion.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | CHRISTY PORTER, Porter is a free-lance writer in Spokane, Wash.
Circling crows appear like smudges on the pale winter sky, occasionally swooping to peck at frozen road-kill. The last few miles on Highway 15 from Helena to the Butte stockyards are harsh and not that pretty. At the yard, Ralph Beer struggles against a 1,200-pound cow and the cold wind until the animal is finally in the auction stall. Then Beer lights a cigarette, perches on a rickety fence gate and muses on the state of literature in Montana.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | LEE DEMBART
The Flight of the Iguana: A Sidelong View of Science and Nature by David Quammen (Delacorte Press: $17.95; 302 pages) A couple of months ago in this space I commented favorably on "The Man With No Endorphins" by James Gorman, a collection of funny, off-beat articles about science that had originally appeared in Discover magazine.
BOOKS
August 6, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In his ponderous introduction, Trimble asserts, "Contemporary natural history writers speak for the earth." Several of the authors take his claim at face value: Breezes become nature's sighs, birds are transformed into symbols of freedom, every square foot of land trod by humans is a paradise lost. Unlike the modern masters of the genre, Loren Eiseley and Stephen J.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Not long ago I was at Book Soup before a reading; a woman at the counter proclaimed loudly that she needed a book to read next. I spotted one of my favorite books of the fall on the display between us and couldn't help but blurt out my suggestion. Maybe it was my effusive praise that persuaded her - she bought the book - or maybe it was its cover. For my money, it's one of the best of the year. That cover - so good because it's so fitting - was wrapped around the delightfully funny novel "Where'd You Go, Bernadette" (Little, Brown and Co.,$25.99)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|