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David R Ellis

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013
David R. Ellis, 60, a journeyman director and former stuntman whose credits include the 2006 thriller "Snakes on a Plane," died Monday morning in Johannesburg, South Africa, where he was in pre-production on the upcoming film "Kite" with Samuel L. Jackson. The cause of death was unknown, said his agent, David Boxerbaum. Ellis most recently served as the second unit director on several upcoming high-profile films including "47 Ronin," starring Keanu Reeves; "R.I.P.D. " with Ryan Reynolds; and the adaptation of Mark Helprin's novel "Winter's Tale.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013
David R. Ellis, 60, a journeyman director and former stuntman whose credits include the 2006 thriller "Snakes on a Plane," died Monday morning in Johannesburg, South Africa, where he was in pre-production on the upcoming film "Kite" with Samuel L. Jackson. The cause of death was unknown, said his agent, David Boxerbaum. Ellis most recently served as the second unit director on several upcoming high-profile films including "47 Ronin," starring Keanu Reeves; "R.I.P.D. " with Ryan Reynolds; and the adaptation of Mark Helprin's novel "Winter's Tale.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Journeyman director and former stuntman David R. Ellis died Monday morning in Johannesburg, South Africa, where he was in pre-production on the upcoming film "Kite" with Samuel L. Jackson. The cause of death is unknown, said his agent, David Boxerbaum. Ellis was 60. Ellis most recently served as the second unit director on several upcoming high-profile films including the Keanu Reeves-starrer "47 Ronin"; "R.I.P.D. " with Ryan Reynolds; and the adaptation of Mark Helprin's novel "Winter's Tale.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Journeyman director and former stuntman David R. Ellis died Monday morning in Johannesburg, South Africa, where he was in pre-production on the upcoming film "Kite" with Samuel L. Jackson. The cause of death is unknown, said his agent, David Boxerbaum. Ellis was 60. Ellis most recently served as the second unit director on several upcoming high-profile films including the Keanu Reeves-starrer "47 Ronin"; "R.I.P.D. " with Ryan Reynolds; and the adaptation of Mark Helprin's novel "Winter's Tale.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2003 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
Action movies are in David R. Ellis' bones -- part of his cinematic DNA you might say. A onetime stuntman on "Days of Thunder" and "Lethal Weapon," he's been shooting second-unit footage on high-end action projects such as "Patriot Games," "The Perfect Storm" and the upcoming "The Matrix Reloaded," for more than 20 years. Ellis has watched the genre evolve from straight-on action sequences in "Bullitt" and "The Dirty Dozen" to the pyrotechnics of "The Matrix."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Sharks have it bad enough as endangered, misunderstood predators with a terrible public relations image without seeing their serial-killing stardom drowned out by hammy acting and torture-porn villainy. But that's the take-away from "Shark Night 3D," a disposable hard-body-count B movie in which party-hearty college students (including "American Idol" alum Katharine McPhee) hit the Louisiana bayou for a weekend of looking tan and beautiful so moviegoers can hit the multiplex for low-rent "Jaws"-knockoff carnage.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Action thrillers are fun when filmmakers teeter at the edge of implausibility -- without slipping over it. If "Collateral" is an excellent example of how to go right up to the brink with finesse, "Cellular" illustrates what happens when a viable premise is spoiled by sheer preposterousness. The movie strains to divert audiences but short-changes them instead. Written by Chris Morgan from a story by shrewd veteran Larry Cohen and directed by David R.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2009 | Gary Goldstein
It doesn't take 3-D trickery to see everything coming at you from a mile away in "The Final Destination," the silly and predictable fourth installment in the lucrative thriller series about pretty young people attempting to cheat death. Director David R. Ellis and writer Eric Bress, who previously collaborated on "Final Destination 2," unimaginatively rehash the earlier films' basic premise: Someone foresees a gruesome group death that may or may not play out in reality if the order of the originally envisioned victims can be disrupted.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
In the first "Final Destination," 40 high school seniors from a Manhattan suburb take off from JFK for a 10-day Paris field trip with four teachers. The jet barely leaves the ground before it explodes, killing everybody aboard. The catch was that the disaster hadn't actually occurred -- yet. It was a premonition in one student's mind so vivid and terrifying he desperately tries to get everyone to disembark.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1996 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
Giving voice to a dog's inner life is probably a noble pursuit, so it's inspiring to hear Michael J. Fox straining against his tether to do so in "Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco"--even if the film exhibits a bit too much physical evidence of a dog's inner life to suit me.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2003 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
Action movies are in David R. Ellis' bones -- part of his cinematic DNA you might say. A onetime stuntman on "Days of Thunder" and "Lethal Weapon," he's been shooting second-unit footage on high-end action projects such as "Patriot Games," "The Perfect Storm" and the upcoming "The Matrix Reloaded," for more than 20 years. Ellis has watched the genre evolve from straight-on action sequences in "Bullitt" and "The Dirty Dozen" to the pyrotechnics of "The Matrix."
NEWS
July 24, 2003 | Susan King
Final Destination 2 A.J. Cook, Ali Larter New Line, $27 Fans of bloody, R-rated horror films will get a kick out of the gleefully gruesome scenes in this better-than-average sequel to the 2000 hit thriller. Just as in the original, someone has a vision of a horrible accident and ends up disrupting death's plans. But there is no stopping the grim reaper and an extremely violent rampage ensues.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2011
It's hard not to admire the visual artistry in co-writer-directors Alexei Kaleina and Craig Macneill's "The Afterlight," with its beautifully composed shots of lyrical, sometimes-ominous countryside and near-painterly, lived-in interiors; Zoe White's cinematography is nothing short of masterful. At the same time, it's hard to embrace this glacially paced, symbolism-heavy film's elusive — when it's not being elliptical — story about a city couple's escape to rural life. Andrew (Michael Kelly)
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