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David Saperstein

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2004 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
A clubhouse and swimming pool, miles of manicured trails, a 24-hour video monitoring system and a helipad for last-minute getaways. Sounds like a luxurious day spa where the rich and famous go to unwind. In fact, Hummingbird Nest Ranch is a home for horses.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2004 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
A clubhouse and swimming pool, miles of manicured trails, a 24-hour video monitoring system and a helipad for last-minute getaways. Sounds like a luxurious day spa where the rich and famous go to unwind. In fact, Hummingbird Nest Ranch is a home for horses.
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NEWS
November 28, 1999 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In addition to the small group of men who already exert a profound influence on civic life in Los Angeles without holding any office, there is a larger, less defined cadre who are coming into power or making themselves felt from the margins. Some are looking for a way to amplify their role in Los Angeles' life. Gary Winnick, for instance, struck it rich with his company, Global Crossing Ltd., and recently topped the Los Angeles Business Journal's list of L.A.'s richest people.
NEWS
November 28, 1999 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In addition to the small group of men who already exert a profound influence on civic life in Los Angeles without holding any office, there is a larger, less defined cadre who are coming into power or making themselves felt from the margins. Some are looking for a way to amplify their role in Los Angeles' life. Gary Winnick, for instance, struck it rich with his company, Global Crossing Ltd., and recently topped the Los Angeles Business Journal's list of L.A.'s richest people.
OPINION
September 19, 1993 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a contributing editor to The Times
Rabbi David Saperstein admits to being in something of a state of shock ever since he went to the White House as one of 3,000 guests invited to witness the signing of the Israeli-PLO peace accord on Monday. Dizzying times. Having spent much of his adult life fighting Israel's battles in Washington, he finds the rules of engagement have changed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
A multimillion-dollar gift will allow Cedars-Sinai Medical Center to build an eight-story critical-care tower that will replace two buildings destroyed in the 1994 Northridge earthquake, hospital officials announced Wednesday. The size of the gift from Suzanne and David Saperstein was undisclosed, but hospital officials said it was larger than a $14-million donation given to Cedars-Sinai in 2002. David Saperstein founded Metro Networks, which produced radio news.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1999 | From Associated Press
Westwood One Inc., the nation's largest distributor of radio programming, is buying leading traffic news provider Metro Networks Inc. for $900 million in stock. The purchase announced Tuesday would add to Westwood One's large portfolio of entertainment, news, sports and talk show programming, which it sends to about 5,000 radio stations worldwide. Westwood One also provided traffic reports through its Shadow Traffic operation, but only in a handful of radio markets.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Fleur de Lys on L.A.'s Westside has changed hands for $102 million, making it the highest-priced home sale ever recorded in L.A. County. Three billionaires engaged in a bidding war for the nearly five-acre trophy estate, the winner closing in 10 days in an all-cash deal that included antique furnishings. The 50,000-square-foot residence was sold by socialite Suzanne Saperstein, who had the mansion custom built in 2002 with her then husband, Metro Networks founder David Saperstein.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
Something seems to happen to independent, low-budget film makers when they take to the country. It's as if they're overwhelmed by all that bucolic simplicity and all those worn Dorothea Lange faces. There have been some terrific backwoods movies, of course, but for the most part they're tedious--mistaking awkwardness for sincerity and rambling like a mountain stream. "A Killing Affair" (selected theaters) is no exception.
OPINION
September 19, 1993 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a contributing editor to The Times
Rabbi David Saperstein admits to being in something of a state of shock ever since he went to the White House as one of 3,000 guests invited to witness the signing of the Israeli-PLO peace accord on Monday. Dizzying times. Having spent much of his adult life fighting Israel's battles in Washington, he finds the rules of engagement have changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1988 | PAT H. BROESKE
So you want to check in on the folks/aliens you met in "Cocoon." Question is: Which sequel should you catch? True, there's 20th Century Fox's just-out screen sequel, "Cocoon: The Return," which marks the feature screenwriting debut of TV writers Stephen McPherson and Elizabeth Bradley. But there's also the just-on-the-stands paperback novel "Metamorphosis." By David Saperstein (from Jove Books), it's the middle of a trilogy that was initiated by Saperstein's best-selling novel, "Cocoon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1992 | From Religious News Service
Former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev moved among the high and mighty during his whirlwind fund-raising tour of the United States, but amid the hoopla he carved out time Wednesday to reflect here with an interfaith group of religious leaders.
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