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David Sculpture

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September 8, 2004 | From Reuters
Today, 500 years to the day that the icon of Renaissance male beauty was unveiled for the people of Florence, Italy, his modern-day co-citizens are kicking off a year of events to celebrate Michelangelo's David in style. There will be concerts, fireworks, symposiums and exhibitions. There is, of course, an official David 500 T-shirt. But most of all, arts officials want the half-millennium of one of the world's most famous nude statues to get people looking forward and not only backward.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
To tourists in Florence, Italy, Michelangelo's marble sculpture of the lad who slew Goliath is a must-see attraction at the Galleria dell'Accademia. More than a million people visit it every year. To art historians, "David" is a seminal masterpiece -- the first of Michelangelo's surviving depictions of heroic male nudes that encapsulate physical power in breathtakingly beautiful form.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2005 | From Reuters
Custodians of Michelangelo's "David" are thinking of blasting air at dusty, sweaty tourists to stop them from sullying the Renaissance sex symbol. Months after a painstaking and costly cleanup of the 500-year-old nude statue, experts at the Galleria dell'Accademia in Florence, Italy found dust and humidity brought in by streams of tourists had begun to tarnish their top crowd-puller again.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2005 | From Reuters
Custodians of Michelangelo's "David" are thinking of blasting air at dusty, sweaty tourists to stop them from sullying the Renaissance sex symbol. Months after a painstaking and costly cleanup of the 500-year-old nude statue, experts at the Galleria dell'Accademia in Florence, Italy found dust and humidity brought in by streams of tourists had begun to tarnish their top crowd-puller again.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2004 | From Reuters
He's not in bad shape considering he celebrates his 500th birthday this year, but Michelangelo's "David" is suffering from weak ankles. A team of art restorers, halfway through giving the white marble statue his first bath in more than a century, say they want to give David a scan to assess the damage. "The ankles are one of the most fragile parts of the sculpture; they are full of cracks," said Cinzia Parnigoni, the restorer in charge of the cleanup at Florence's Galleria dell'Accademia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
To tourists in Florence, Italy, Michelangelo's marble sculpture of the lad who slew Goliath is a must-see attraction at the Galleria dell'Accademia. More than a million people visit it every year. To art historians, "David" is a seminal masterpiece -- the first of Michelangelo's surviving depictions of heroic male nudes that encapsulate physical power in breathtakingly beautiful form.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | JOE McDONALD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The painting of Mao Tse-tung as a Renaissance saint was too risky for the Shanghai 2000 Biennial. The photo of a man eating a dead baby was too disturbing. The works, rejected by the Shanghai Art Museum's official contemporary art show, went on display at private galleries. That's when police raided a gallery and seized the exhibits. The two-month Biennial, with 67 artists from 15 countries, is China's bid to join the club of biannual art extravaganzas led by Venice and New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1988 | William Wilson
If there be great social and political import in David Anderson's sculpture, it is largely frightened off by its coarse, Gargantuan structure. The L.A. artist brings a junk sculptor's vision to the making of oversize grotesques on Oriental themes. "Paris/Peking" is a green patinated copper pagoda rising on a schematized Chinese table until the whole rises some 9 feet. "Opium" is an equally overscaled model of a traditional Chinese vessel sprouting a bouquet of iron flowers and chains.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Sarah Richards, Special to The Times
Texas artist David Adickes will tell you himself that it's massive size, more than artistic vision, that distinguishes his statues of American presidents. Paeans to history in concrete and steel, the 18- to 20-foot-tall busts fill two outdoor museums dedicated to education and civic responsibility, but they're bringing their creator no small measure of notoriety. Not everyone, it seems, appreciates a reinterpretation of Mt. Rushmore.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
In his first West Coast museum show, British conceptual artist Richard Long today is scheduled to unveil the fruits of his just completed, 10-day residency at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art. The artist, who began his residency Aug. 10, was still immersed in his work at press time, but museum director Hugh M. Davies told The Times what viewers could expect from the exhibit, which will be on display through Oct. 15.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2004 | From Reuters
Today, 500 years to the day that the icon of Renaissance male beauty was unveiled for the people of Florence, Italy, his modern-day co-citizens are kicking off a year of events to celebrate Michelangelo's David in style. There will be concerts, fireworks, symposiums and exhibitions. There is, of course, an official David 500 T-shirt. But most of all, arts officials want the half-millennium of one of the world's most famous nude statues to get people looking forward and not only backward.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2004 | From Reuters
He's not in bad shape considering he celebrates his 500th birthday this year, but Michelangelo's "David" is suffering from weak ankles. A team of art restorers, halfway through giving the white marble statue his first bath in more than a century, say they want to give David a scan to assess the damage. "The ankles are one of the most fragile parts of the sculpture; they are full of cracks," said Cinzia Parnigoni, the restorer in charge of the cleanup at Florence's Galleria dell'Accademia.
NEWS
January 30, 1997 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In a windfall of artworks that couldn't have been acquired any other way, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles announced Wednesday that it will receive a gift of 105 works by 53 artists from the Lannan Foundation, which is in the process of dispersing its landmark contemporary art collection. The donation--valued by the foundation at more than $2 million and tailored to fit MOCA's artistic mission--will significantly enrich the museum's 4,000-piece holding of postwar art.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2004 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Clambering down the scaffolding along the backside of Michelangelo's "David," a visitor can see the flaws up close: the purplish blemish, the yellowish stain, the small cracks. "David's" perfect buttocks, it seems, are less so than once thought. The icon of Renaissance male beauty has just had his first bath in 130 years, a meticulous, yearlong endeavor that stirred the age-old debate over how -- and whether -- to restore classic works of art.
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