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David Sickler

NEWS
May 16, 1990 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerber Romero, 28, once was happy with his life and work as a teacher in his native El Salvador. But four years ago, the death and violence in that war-wracked country took its toll. "I love to teach and I love to learn," he explains. "But under the fire, that was impossible." So, crawling through the underbrush one night, Romero crossed the border and illegally entered the United States, seeking peace and a better life. That was not what he found.
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BUSINESS
August 25, 1987 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
The AFL-CIO won a major but not total victory last week in its 10-year war with the Adolph Coors Co. A final victory is almost sure to come soon, when Coors workers vote on union representation. Even so, what already has occurred is a stunning success for the nationwide Coors boycott that was staged by labor.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1986 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Horse racing, sometimes called the "sport of kings," used to rely heavily on poor illegal aliens to perform jobs that track officials said most U.S. citizens and others here legally just would not do. Now, however, by raising wages and improving working conditions, they are attracting domestic workers to those so-called undesirable jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN and PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Workers at the General Motors factory in Van Nuys paid little attention when a new attendant was hired last year to service vending machines scattered throughout the plant. But union officials now say the attendant was keeping a closer watch on his fellow workers than on the machines. Last month, a year after the attendant was hired, 18 assembly line and other workers were suspended from their jobs amid allegations of narcotics trafficking and theft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN and PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Workers at the General Motors factory in Van Nuys paid little attention when a new attendant was hired last year to service vending machines scattered throughout the plant. But union officials now say the attendant was keeping a closer watch on his fellow workers than on the machines. Last month, a year after the attendant was hired, 18 assembly line and other workers were suspended from their jobs amid allegations of narcotics trafficking and theft.
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For hours I lay awake. . .my semi-conscious mind brought me bodies--arms and legs and torsos of people, some dressed in dirty factory clothes, others in starched white uniforms, some in ill-fitted dresses. But no faces. . .A hundred gray men walked together, slowly, coming closer and closer. . .But no faces. Not one. God, no! Please! Just one face. Twenty years. Twenty years worth of victims and not one I could remember.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
Not many years ago, most American labor unions did not have much use for a newly arrived immigrant such as Roberto Rodriguez. Immigrants were often here illegally, did not speak English and were regarded as potential strikebreakers. These days, Rodriguez, a $7.65-an-hour factory worker, sits in a conference room across from his bosses, who run a large automobile wheel foundry near Compton.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is still dark a few minutes before 6 a.m. at Broadway and 1st Street in downtown Los Angeles. Women are lined up blank-faced at the bus stops, huddled against the chilled air and waiting for their transportation to Beverly Hills or Pacific Palisades. With patient deliberation, Libertad Rivera moves from woman to woman. Eyeing their shoes and the clothes they have packed in shoulder bags, she recognizes many as live-in maids returning to their jobs after the weekend.
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