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David Vanole

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SPORTS
January 27, 1990
The way the U.S. Soccer Federation has handled the current contract situation with the players of the U.S. national team is typical of the treatment of soccer in this country for years. Congratulations to Paul Caligiuri and David Vanole for standing up to the federation. They are two reasons why the team is going to Italy this summer. Another sorry chapter in the history of American soccer. PETER BARKS, Manhattan Beach
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2007 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
David Vanole, the starting goalkeeper for the U.S. soccer team at the 1988 Summer Olympics who later helped the United States qualify for the World Cup for the first time in four decades, has died. He was 43. Vanole, who had long battled a weight problem, collapsed Monday while on a family skiing trip in Utah and died later that day in Salt Lake City. A cause of death was not announced.
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SPORTS
January 8, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY
Former UCLA goalkeeper David Vanole, who started three of the United States' eight qualifying games last year for soccer's 1990 World Cup, has been a no-show since the national team opened its training camp Friday in La Jolla. "All we know of David's decision is that I got a note here saying he's not pleased with the general situation and that he's not going to show up," Coach Bob Gansler said Sunday.
SPORTS
May 5, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Goalkeeper David Vanole was a leader of a holdout against the U.S. soccer team in January, which proved to be a problem for him when no one followed. He was the only player who did not report for the team's first training camp of the year in January at La Jolla, and U.S. Soccer Federation officials promptly withdrew their contract offer and told Vanole they would call him when he was needed.
SPORTS
February 2, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With no games for more than two months, the soccer players of the U.S. national team have faced stiffer opposition off the field than on it. Whether that has made them battle-tested, or just battle-weary, will be revealed tonight, when they play for the first time since qualifying last November for this summer's World Cup. Their first-round opponent in the Marlboro Cup at the Orange Bowl is a familiar one, Costa Rica, which has even less World Cup experience than the United States.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | Ray Ripton
Harbor College baseball Coach Jim O'Brien, entering his 12th year at the school, says that his new catcher, George Pedre, is "the most awesome power hitter I have ever coached." When Pedre played for Coach Art Harris last year on the now-defunct West Los Angeles College team, Harris said the same thing about Pedre. So did Dave Ruebsamen, his coach at Culver City High School.
SPORTS
May 5, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Goalkeeper David Vanole was a leader of a holdout against the U.S. soccer team in January, which proved to be a problem for him when no one followed. He was the only player who did not report for the team's first training camp of the year in January at La Jolla, and U.S. Soccer Federation officials promptly withdrew their contract offer and told Vanole they would call him when he was needed.
SPORTS
June 18, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
David Vanole, the U.S. goalkeeper, was not certain afterward whether he saw the ball coming toward him. He did know that it bounced off his knee and away from the goal, sparing the United States the embarrassment of another tie at home in a World Cup soccer qualifying game. It is such a slim difference, that between triumph and despair. Vanole felt the latter in the United States' last qualifying game at Torrance in May, when Trinidad and Tobago scored with two minutes remaining for a 1-1 tie. He accepted blame for the goal, even though it was not entirely his fault.
SPORTS
September 21, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
After 6 members of the U.S. soccer team, including 3 starters, were stricken with food poisoning Sunday night, U.S. Soccer Federation officials blamed pizza the players had eaten at a restaurant outside their hotel. But David Vanole, the former UCLA goalkeeper from Manhattan Beach, said that he believed it was unfair to pan the pizza. After all, he said, he ate it, too, and didn't get sick. Or could it be that Vanole is invincible these days?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2007 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
David Vanole, the starting goalkeeper for the U.S. soccer team at the 1988 Summer Olympics who later helped the United States qualify for the World Cup for the first time in four decades, has died. He was 43. Vanole, who had long battled a weight problem, collapsed Monday while on a family skiing trip in Utah and died later that day in Salt Lake City. A cause of death was not announced.
SPORTS
February 2, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With no games for more than two months, the soccer players of the U.S. national team have faced stiffer opposition off the field than on it. Whether that has made them battle-tested, or just battle-weary, will be revealed tonight, when they play for the first time since qualifying last November for this summer's World Cup. Their first-round opponent in the Marlboro Cup at the Orange Bowl is a familiar one, Costa Rica, which has even less World Cup experience than the United States.
SPORTS
January 27, 1990
The way the U.S. Soccer Federation has handled the current contract situation with the players of the U.S. national team is typical of the treatment of soccer in this country for years. Congratulations to Paul Caligiuri and David Vanole for standing up to the federation. They are two reasons why the team is going to Italy this summer. Another sorry chapter in the history of American soccer. PETER BARKS, Manhattan Beach
SPORTS
January 8, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY
Former UCLA goalkeeper David Vanole, who started three of the United States' eight qualifying games last year for soccer's 1990 World Cup, has been a no-show since the national team opened its training camp Friday in La Jolla. "All we know of David's decision is that I got a note here saying he's not pleased with the general situation and that he's not going to show up," Coach Bob Gansler said Sunday.
SPORTS
June 18, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
David Vanole, the U.S. goalkeeper, was not certain afterward whether he saw the ball coming toward him. He did know that it bounced off his knee and away from the goal, sparing the United States the embarrassment of another tie at home in a World Cup soccer qualifying game. It is such a slim difference, that between triumph and despair. Vanole felt the latter in the United States' last qualifying game at Torrance in May, when Trinidad and Tobago scored with two minutes remaining for a 1-1 tie. He accepted blame for the goal, even though it was not entirely his fault.
SPORTS
September 21, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
After 6 members of the U.S. soccer team, including 3 starters, were stricken with food poisoning Sunday night, U.S. Soccer Federation officials blamed pizza the players had eaten at a restaurant outside their hotel. But David Vanole, the former UCLA goalkeeper from Manhattan Beach, said that he believed it was unfair to pan the pizza. After all, he said, he ate it, too, and didn't get sick. Or could it be that Vanole is invincible these days?
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | Ray Ripton
Harbor College baseball Coach Jim O'Brien, entering his 12th year at the school, says that his new catcher, George Pedre, is "the most awesome power hitter I have ever coached." When Pedre played for Coach Art Harris last year on the now-defunct West Los Angeles College team, Harris said the same thing about Pedre. So did Dave Ruebsamen, his coach at Culver City High School.
SPORTS
June 19, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Some countries have a lot of players from one club on their national teams. The United States does, too, and the name of the club is UCLA. There are four Bruins on the U.S. World Cup team, nearly 20% of the roster. Paul Caligiuri starts, while Paul Krumpe, David Vanole and Chris Henderson sit on the bench. "I wish my former teammates would be out on the field, too," Caligiuri said. "But I think the players who have been out there have done a quality job."
SPORTS
March 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The head of soccer in the United States said Bob Gansler will remain as coach of the American national team through the 1994 World Cup. U.S. Soccer Federation President Werner Fricker gave the vote of confidence to Gansler on Wednesday during a news conference to announce exhibition games at Liechtenstein and Switzerland and against Poland at Hershey, Pa. Gansler, who replaced Lothar Osiander as U.S. coach on Jan. 16, 1989, has been criticized by players for constant lineup juggling.
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