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David Wenham

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a party in Sydney, a young man and a young woman catch each other's eye and end up sharing a taxi. She is Cin (Susie Porter), he is Josh (David Wenham), a wildlife photographer from Australia due to return to London, where he now lives, in three days. Their attraction is mutual, but they almost resist stating what's on both their minds: a one-night stand with no strings attached.
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NEWS
March 15, 2007 | Mark Sachs
"WHEN I first started coming to L.A.," says Aussie actor David Wenham, "it was a bit frightening, an overwhelming place. But I've been here 30 times in the last handful of years, and now I feel at home as soon as I step off the plane. I have great memories here." Like last weekend's, when his film "300" opened and promptly hit No. 1 at the box office. Wenham, in town to promote the sword-and-sandal spectacle, seems primed to make even newer memories.
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NEWS
March 15, 2007 | Mark Sachs
"WHEN I first started coming to L.A.," says Aussie actor David Wenham, "it was a bit frightening, an overwhelming place. But I've been here 30 times in the last handful of years, and now I feel at home as soon as I step off the plane. I have great memories here." Like last weekend's, when his film "300" opened and promptly hit No. 1 at the box office. Wenham, in town to promote the sword-and-sandal spectacle, seems primed to make even newer memories.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a party in Sydney, a young man and a young woman catch each other's eye and end up sharing a taxi. She is Cin (Susie Porter), he is Josh (David Wenham), a wildlife photographer from Australia due to return to London, where he now lives, in three days. Their attraction is mutual, but they almost resist stating what's on both their minds: a one-night stand with no strings attached.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Russian Doll" is a minor and unoriginal comedy from Australia starring--and co-produced by--Hugo Weaving, who came to international attention as the most wistful of the drag queens in "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert" and went on to further renown in "The Matrix." Weaving has charm and versatility, and here he's ventured into Hugh Grant territory. But he hasn't quite the looks or star power to pull it off.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Australia's "The Bank" is a caustic attack on corporate greed in the form of a suspense thriller. Writer-director Robert Connolly has done a dazzling job of working out an intricate plot that involves a formidable knowledge of the possibilities of computer technology and the workings of modern banking, and has balanced it with a firm grasp of character.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2002 | Robert W. Welkos
Among the many actors from Down Under who have migrated to U.S. shores to forge successful movie careers -- Mel Gibson, Russell Crowe, Geoffrey Rush and Heath Ledger immediately come to mind -- the name Anthony LaPaglia may not immediately register with the average American moviegoer. But the versatile Adelaide-born Tony Award-winning actor with the Italian name and American accent, who has lived in New York for two decades, is on a roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Top of the Lake" is the first miniseries from filmmaker Jane Campion of New Zealand ("The Piano," "Bright Star"). I have seen only the first three of its seven parts, which begin Monday with two episodes on Sundance Channel, and though I suppose there is some chance it all will go off the rails, early signs suggest it will bend toward something even more mysterious, beautiful, unsettling and satisfying than the mysterious, beautiful, unsettling, satisfying...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If ever there was a film that would have benefited from some ripped-from-the-headlines fervor, it is "Oranges and Sunshine," starring Emily Watson, Hugo Weaving and David Wenham. This too-quiet, too-sluggish film tells the nearly unfathomable true story of roughly 130,000 British children, wards of the state in the '40s and '50s, who were told their parents had died and that "oranges and sunshine" awaited them in Australia. Instead, they were shipped Down Under to draconian orphanages where they suffered sexual abuse and were forced into labor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Dust" is a bust, a big bad movie of the scope, ambition and bravura that could be made only by a talented filmmaker run amok. Macedonian-born, New York-based Milcho Manchevski, whose first film was the elegiac 1994 "Before the Rain," attempts a Middle Eastern western, a fusion suggesting the timeless universality of chronic bloodlust.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010
SERIES Extreme Makeover: Home Edition: "Good Morning America" weather anchor Sam Champion and the Muppets help Ty Pennington and the team rebuild a home and day care facility for a family in St. Paul, Minn., where a woman sacrificed a promising career in the public school system to run a center for children in her rapidly deteriorating 100-year-old home (8 p.m. ABC). Desperate Housewives: In the aftermath of the plane crash, the residents of Wisteria Lane think about what their lives might have been like had they made different choices, while Angie (Drea de Matteo)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1997 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
They can't sing, they don't speak Italian, and most of them are heavily medicated. Nevertheless, with the help of their young theater director and against the orders of the administration, the patients at a mental institution in Sydney, Australia, are determined to mount an in-asylum production of Mozart's comic opera "Cosi fan Tutte."
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