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David

ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2001 | CAROLYN SEE, Carolyn See's most recent novel is "The Handyman" (Random House)
My friend and I started out on a recent Saturday night to find the pavilion in East L.A., on 1st and Boyle, where mariachis wait to be hired for weekend parties. David, an activist cabdriver, said he'd been there many times, and I made a dinner reservation for 9 at La Serenata de Garibaldi on 1st. We were leaving at 4:30 from Pacific Palisades; we'd have plenty of time to check out the scene, interview some folks, pick up some business cards.
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BOOKS
April 23, 1989 | Kristiana Gregory G re gory is the author of "Jenny of the Tetons" (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich). and
Any Southern California kid who's ventured onto the ocean by boat or Boogie board will love reading about David, an eighth-grader who inherits a 22-foot sloop from his uncle. Gary Paulsen's The Voyage of the Frog (Orchard Books: $12.95; 143 pp., ages 11-13) is a hair-raising adventure that gives new meaning to a day sail. It's about survival and a boy's coming-of-age, similar to Paulsen's Newbery Honor Books "Dogsong" (1985) and "Hatchet" (1987). The first clue of things to come is in Neil Waldman's dramatic jacket painting that shows a sailboat struggling in heavy seas under ominous gray skies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1988 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
On Jan. 7, Karen and Larry Duncan dropped off their 6-month-old twins, Amanda and David, at the Canyon Country home of Vickie Maas. Maas had been baby-sitting for the twins for only four days, ever since Karen Duncan's maternity leave had ended. The couple had just settled down to breakfast at Patsy's Cafe in Van Nuys when the controller of the company where they both worked ran in, telling them that Maas had called and said one of the babies had stopped breathing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | T.H. McCULLOH
David and Doe have gathered the scattered remains of a far-flung flock to their home near Madison, Wis. It's a stormy weekend in 1979 and the low rumble of thunder echoes through Kathleen Tolan's "A Weekend Near Madison" at the Powerhouse Theater. "Madison" is bound by nostalgia to its roots in the late '60s. Its characters are testimony to failed dreams and compromise, and ache with being thirtysomething. Poor kids.
SPORTS
February 17, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones
David Beckham had warned his AC Milan teammates that if they allowed Wayne Rooney the freedom to operate, the Manchester United striker would punish them. Rooney did just that on Tuesday night in Italy. Playing in his 50th European Champions League game, Rooney headed in two goals to propel Manchester United to a 3-2 victory that leaves the English champions with a distinct upper hand in the two-game, round-of-16 series. A tie when the teams meet again in the return leg in Manchester on March 10 will be enough to put three-time champion United into the quarterfinals and seven-time champion Milan out of the competition.
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2003 | James Bates and Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writers
Entertainment journalist Tom King, who wrote the Wall Street Journal's influential "Hollywood Journal" column and a best-selling biography of mogul David Geffen, died Sunday. He was 39. King was in the Hamptons in New York visiting Broadway producer Jeffrey Seller ("Rent"), a friend of King since they attended a summer theater program for high school students in 1981. Seller said that King had been in good spirits but had complained of a headache, although it seemed nothing out of the ordinary.
MAGAZINE
July 22, 1990 | JOHN JOHNSON and RONALD L. SOBLE, John Johnson and Ronald L. Soble, Times staff writers, are working on a book about the Menendez case for New American Library.
ON A MILD SUNDAY last summer, a string of "popping sounds" drifted through the lazy night air of Beverly Hills around 10 o'clock. "I didn't think anything of it," said Tom Zlotow, a neighbor who soon learned that the noises he'd heard from the house right behind his were echoes of the most sensational crime in the history of Beverly Hills. "I didn't even think it could be gunfire, especially around here."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Clarice Taylor, an actress best known for portraying the self-possessed Grandmother Huxtable on the hit television sitcom "The Cosby Show," died Monday. She was 93. Taylor died of congestive heart failure at her home in Englewood., N.J., said Ulysses Carter, her public relations representative. Bill Cosby said she was "perfect" as the mother of his character, Cliff Huxtable, on the NBC series that aired from 1984 to 1992 except she looked "young enough to play my sister. " "She did stand-up comedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1988 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
It's Friday night at the drive-in. As the pale-skinned hero of the season's hot new martial-arts flick snaps the bones of the Asian archvillain, the Winnetka 6 erupts in honking horns and flashing headlights. The movie that has the big-wheeled pickups beeping is "Bloodsport." Advertised as the true story of an American who defeated all comers 13 years ago in a no-holds-barred international tournament of warriors, the movie opened last month at 800 U.S.
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