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April 23, 1989 | Kristiana Gregory G re gory is the author of "Jenny of the Tetons" (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich). and
Any Southern California kid who's ventured onto the ocean by boat or Boogie board will love reading about David, an eighth-grader who inherits a 22-foot sloop from his uncle. Gary Paulsen's The Voyage of the Frog (Orchard Books: $12.95; 143 pp., ages 11-13) is a hair-raising adventure that gives new meaning to a day sail. It's about survival and a boy's coming-of-age, similar to Paulsen's Newbery Honor Books "Dogsong" (1985) and "Hatchet" (1987). The first clue of things to come is in Neil Waldman's dramatic jacket painting that shows a sailboat struggling in heavy seas under ominous gray skies.
March 7, 1988 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
On Jan. 7, Karen and Larry Duncan dropped off their 6-month-old twins, Amanda and David, at the Canyon Country home of Vickie Maas. Maas had been baby-sitting for the twins for only four days, ever since Karen Duncan's maternity leave had ended. The couple had just settled down to breakfast at Patsy's Cafe in Van Nuys when the controller of the company where they both worked ran in, telling them that Maas had called and said one of the babies had stopped breathing.
September 15, 1989 | T.H. McCULLOH
David and Doe have gathered the scattered remains of a far-flung flock to their home near Madison, Wis. It's a stormy weekend in 1979 and the low rumble of thunder echoes through Kathleen Tolan's "A Weekend Near Madison" at the Powerhouse Theater. "Madison" is bound by nostalgia to its roots in the late '60s. Its characters are testimony to failed dreams and compromise, and ache with being thirtysomething. Poor kids.
January 18, 1994 | Craig Turner and Richard E. Meyer, Times Staff Writers
Beate Heuss had nearly conquered her fear when she felt it again. That's why it was so terrifying. It was happening again. She and her husband, David, were in bed, like the last time. In a mobile home, just like the last time. It was, in fact, the same mobile home, at the same trailer park. "This one felt much worse," she said afterward, calm but able to remember every tremor, then the shaking, then the violence. "It was much harder, a hard jolt. The '71 one swayed a little. " But this one did not sway.
February 17, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones
David Beckham had warned his AC Milan teammates that if they allowed Wayne Rooney the freedom to operate, the Manchester United striker would punish them. Rooney did just that on Tuesday night in Italy. Playing in his 50th European Champions League game, Rooney headed in two goals to propel Manchester United to a 3-2 victory that leaves the English champions with a distinct upper hand in the two-game, round-of-16 series. A tie when the teams meet again in the return leg in Manchester on March 10 will be enough to put three-time champion United into the quarterfinals and seven-time champion Milan out of the competition.
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
December 5, 2004 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
As a boy, Father William Sanchez sensed he was different. His Catholic family spun tops on Christmas, shunned pork and whispered of a past in medieval Spain. If anyone knew the secret, they weren't telling, and Sanchez stopped asking. Then three years ago, after watching a program on genealogy, Sanchez sent for a DNA kit that could help track a person's background through genetic footprinting. He soon got a call from Bennett Greenspan, owner of the Houston-based testing company.
May 1, 1988 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
It's Friday night at the drive-in. As the pale-skinned hero of the season's hot new martial-arts flick snaps the bones of the Asian archvillain, the Winnetka 6 erupts in honking horns and flashing headlights. The movie that has the big-wheeled pickups beeping is "Bloodsport." Advertised as the true story of an American who defeated all comers 13 years ago in a no-holds-barred international tournament of warriors, the movie opened last month at 800 U.S.
January 14, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has refused to lift a 30-year consent decree that bars the Republican National Committee from targeting racial and ethnic minorities in its efforts to end fraudulent voting. The justices without comment turned down an appeal from RNC lawyers who said the decree has become “antiquated” and is “increasingly used as political weapon” by Democrats during national campaigns. For their part, lawyers for the Democratic National Committee had argued that recent campaigns show the “consent degree remains necessary today.” The court's action is a victory for the DNC, and it comes after an election year in which the two parties regularly exchanged charges over “voter fraud” and “voter intimidation.” But most of the recent battles have been fought on the state level, and it is not clear whether the long-standing consent decree has had much impact.
It was just another tragedy in family court. A young crack mother, desperate to conceal her pregnancy, had locked herself in a tenement bathroom and given birth to a three-pound boy. As she pushed, he fell to the floor and broke his skull. The mother abandoned him, like she had two previous babies. All were born addicted to crack. "Can we do anything about this woman?" asks Judge Judith Sheindlin, her voice taut with anger.
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