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NATIONAL
September 14, 2013 | By Jenney Deam
LONGMONT, Colo. - David and Lisa Sangelo loved the view from the deck of their home perched on a hillside: the sweetly churning St. Vrain River, green, rolling hillsides, rustic homes, a lightly traveled highway connecting them to civilization. But this week their bucolic landscape began to turn on them. At 2 a.m. Thursday, sirens wailed and a booming voice came over emergency system speakers that are scattered throughout the valley. “Impending flood,” it warned. “Seek higher ground immediately.” The phone rang with a robo-call telling residents to seek safety.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2001 | CAROLYN SEE, Carolyn See's most recent novel is "The Handyman" (Random House)
My friend and I started out on a recent Saturday night to find the pavilion in East L.A., on 1st and Boyle, where mariachis wait to be hired for weekend parties. David, an activist cabdriver, said he'd been there many times, and I made a dinner reservation for 9 at La Serenata de Garibaldi on 1st. We were leaving at 4:30 from Pacific Palisades; we'd have plenty of time to check out the scene, interview some folks, pick up some business cards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1988 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
On Jan. 7, Karen and Larry Duncan dropped off their 6-month-old twins, Amanda and David, at the Canyon Country home of Vickie Maas. Maas had been baby-sitting for the twins for only four days, ever since Karen Duncan's maternity leave had ended. The couple had just settled down to breakfast at Patsy's Cafe in Van Nuys when the controller of the company where they both worked ran in, telling them that Maas had called and said one of the babies had stopped breathing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | T.H. McCULLOH
David and Doe have gathered the scattered remains of a far-flung flock to their home near Madison, Wis. It's a stormy weekend in 1979 and the low rumble of thunder echoes through Kathleen Tolan's "A Weekend Near Madison" at the Powerhouse Theater. "Madison" is bound by nostalgia to its roots in the late '60s. Its characters are testimony to failed dreams and compromise, and ache with being thirtysomething. Poor kids.
NEWS
January 18, 1994 | Craig Turner and Richard E. Meyer, Times Staff Writers
Beate Heuss had nearly conquered her fear when she felt it again. That's why it was so terrifying. It was happening again. She and her husband, David, were in bed, like the last time. In a mobile home, just like the last time. It was, in fact, the same mobile home, at the same trailer park. "This one felt much worse," she said afterward, calm but able to remember every tremor, then the shaking, then the violence. "It was much harder, a hard jolt. The '71 one swayed a little. " But this one did not sway.
SPORTS
February 17, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones
David Beckham had warned his AC Milan teammates that if they allowed Wayne Rooney the freedom to operate, the Manchester United striker would punish them. Rooney did just that on Tuesday night in Italy. Playing in his 50th European Champions League game, Rooney headed in two goals to propel Manchester United to a 3-2 victory that leaves the English champions with a distinct upper hand in the two-game, round-of-16 series. A tie when the teams meet again in the return leg in Manchester on March 10 will be enough to put three-time champion United into the quarterfinals and seven-time champion Milan out of the competition.
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
When the last Jungle Cruise boat docks for the night and lights fade to black on Sleeping Beauty's Castle, the real work begins. At lush Pixie Hollow, gardeners don miner's headlamps as they begin uprooting stubborn weeds. On Main Street, custodians scrape chewing gum off the sidewalk. And over at Mickey's Toontown, painters sand and recoat chipped handrails. Few see it happen, except perhaps for the dozens of feral cats that emerge from their hiding places to prowl the park after hours, stalking rodents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1988 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
It's Friday night at the drive-in. As the pale-skinned hero of the season's hot new martial-arts flick snaps the bones of the Asian archvillain, the Winnetka 6 erupts in honking horns and flashing headlights. The movie that has the big-wheeled pickups beeping is "Bloodsport." Advertised as the true story of an American who defeated all comers 13 years ago in a no-holds-barred international tournament of warriors, the movie opened last month at 800 U.S.
TRAVEL
April 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The San Fernando Valley is 260 square miles of suburbia. Actually, make that suburbia on nutritional supplements. And antidepressants. With perhaps a little cosmetic surgery south of Ventura Boulevard, where the big money is. Or maybe - now that it's grown to more than 1.7 million people in nearly three dozen cities and neighborhoods rich and poor - the Valley isn't even a suburb anymore. It begins just 10 miles northwest of Los Angeles City Hall, sprawling west to the Simi Hills, north to the Santa Susana Mountains, and east to the Verdugo and San Gabriel mountains.
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