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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
After the success of "The Social Network," David Fincher's drama about Mark Zuckerberg and the founding of Facebook, the director emerged as the front-runner to bring the story of another tech giant to the big screen: Apple founder Steve Jobs. Now the Hollywood Reporter says Sony Pictures is looking to replace Fincher at the helm of its highly anticipated Jobs biopic, based on Walter Isaacson's bestselling biography "Steve Jobs" with a script by "Social Network" scribe Aaron Sorkin.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
This summer, actor David Suchet will complete a task 25 years in the making when the final adaptations of Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot mysteries are aired. However, if fans want to see Poirot's final three adventures, they'll need a good broadband Internet connection. The English actor Suchet has been playing Christie's Belgian detective creation in a series of adaptations of all 70 of her Poirot stories since 1989. This summer, the 13th series of adaptations, made up of five TV movies, will debut in America, but not all episodes will air on PBS' "Masterpiece Mystery," which has been the show's stateside home for most of its run. The first two films, "The Big Four" and "Dead Man's Folly," will air on PBS on July 27 and Aug.  3, respectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Scott Collins and Meredith Blake
With Stephen Colbert joining CBS, late-night TV's generational shift is complete - and the real battle for viewers, onscreen and online, can begin. America's most-watched network announced Thursday that it had picked Colbert, the 49-year-old host of Comedy Central's news sendup "The Colbert Report," as the next host of "Late Show. " Details of the show, including a start date and its location, have not been revealed. But CBS and Colbert confirmed that he will do the show as himself - and not in his current character, a bumptious right-wing talk host.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Like many Americans last week, I greeted the news of David Letterman's retirement in 2015 with regretful acceptance. I love him with a love deep and true, but the man is pushing 70, and at least we could look forward to another year of his fine, cantankerous self. But now I cannot wait for him to go. From the moment it was announced Thursday that Stephen Colbert would be taking over "Late Show," I was ready to box up Letterman's stuff and move it myself. Because I have to know: Will Colbert change the nature of late night or will the bravest comedian on television just sell out?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Comedian Stephen Colbert will be the next host of "The Late Show. " CBS said Thursday that the "Colbert Report" star will take over hosting duties for the long-running late-night talk franchise when David Letterman retires in 2015. Colbert and the network have reached a five-year agreement, the broadcaster said.   BEST TV OF 2013 Lloyd | McNamara Letterman, who has hosted the show for 21 years, last week announced his retirement on the program.  CBS did not give any details on the creative direction of the show once Colbert takes over, nor did it say where the series will be produced.  "Stephen Colbert is one of the most inventive and respected forces on television," CBS Corp.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Steve Zeitchik
With the news that Stephen Colbert is replacing David Letterman as host of “The Late Show,” the inevitable question from moviedom is: What does this mean for us? Studios and personal publicists have long figured out how to handle Letterman, for all his oddities, and big movie stars regularly make appearances there, even if it doesn't always go smashingly. "The Colbert Report" has been a different story. Actors from big releases, that staple of late-night chat shows, don't often turn up on the Colbert series.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
British architect David Chipperfield has won a high-profile competition to design a home for the Nobel Foundation in Sweden. His proposal, on which he collaborated with his partner Christoph Felger, calls for a light-on-its-feet building overlooking the water on the Blasieholmen peninsula in central Stockholm with a largely transparent facade and brass detailing. It prevailed over finalists Johan Celsing and Gert Wingardh, both Swedish architects. An earlier round in the competition included proposals from firms including Snøhetta , Japan's SANAA and OMA, the Dutch firm led by Rem Koolhaas.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Susan Denley
Interior designer David Bromstad is known for including his own original paintings in the interiors he designs on his HGTV program "Color Splash. " And now Bromstad's fans can incorporate his artwork into their wardrobes, thanks to his partnership with Naturalizer . Bromstad created a painting for Naturalizer and worked with the accessory company to tun it into floral prints used on spring and summer shoes and bags. Bromstad is based in Miami so it's only fitting that the collection has a sunny and vacation-y vibe.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
If, like me, you discovered David Goodis through the 1980s Black Lizard reprints of his novels, Philippe Garnier's “Goodis: A Life in Black and White” (Black Pool Productions: 216 pp., $25 paper) has long been something of a mythic touchstone. Published in France in 1984, it remained unavailable in English for decades - until now, when Garnier's own translation has been released. Goodis is, I think, the greatest of the pulp writers who churned out paperback originals in the 1950s: dime store crime fiction that often rose to the level of art. Jim Thompson, Charles Willeford, Harry Whittington - these were his contemporaries, his peer group, although the truth is Goodis had no peers.
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