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Dayle Mcintosh Center

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1986
Marcida Dodson's article (July 17) about the fine interpreter program for deaf patients at Chapman General Hospital received much interest here at the Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled in Garden Grove. We also are concerned with provision of communication assistance for the deaf in medical emergencies. While we applaud the high quality of the program, we want to inform The Times' readers about another option for deaf patients. Commend (Communication Medical Emergency Network for the Deaf)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Devylder sits behind his desk, a neat pile of chewed pens on its surface. There is an air of movement about him, as if he will stand up at any moment and pace the room to think. But he won't, because he has no legs. If he had hands, he says, he'd shake with you. Devylder (pronounced DEE-velder) is the new director of the Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled in Anaheim. And there's a lot to get done--jobs to fill, new buildings to consider--so he paces in his mind.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992 | TOM McQUEENEY
The Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled will recognize the city next month as the best local government agency in 1992 for providing services to the handicapped. The McIntosh Center will give the city its Apple of Our Eye service leader award during a Sept. 24 breakfast ceremony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1990
Richard Crandall, a Huntington Beach resident and founder of the Short Stature Foundation, received the Dayle McIntosh Center's "barrier buster" award Friday for his work enlightening the community about short people. The Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled honored Crandall and four other people and companies for their work in helping the physically and mentally handicapped to live independently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1989 | JOE BEL BRUNO
A 40-unit apartment complex for handicapped residents will be built in Irvine under an agreement approved Tuesday night. The City Council voted unanimously to buy 2.3 acres for the apartments from the Irvine Co. for $450,000. The city will hold the property until the Dayle McIntosh Center, an Anaheim-based training program for disabled people, receives an expected $2.5 million from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1989
An Anaheim agency has received a $45,000 grant from the state Public Utilities Commission to provide training for disabled people. The Dayle McIntosh Center is one of 32 agencies funded by the commission through $16.5 million in penalties paid by Pacific Bell for marketing abuses that affected consumers with limited experience, poor English-speaking abilities and low incomes. Of the $16.5 million, $5 million is being distributed to local agencies.
NEWS
February 27, 1986
State Sen. John Seymour (R-Anaheim) will be roasted for charity at 7 p.m. March 6 at the Anaheim Hilton and Towers. Proceeds from the $75-a-plate dinner will benefit the Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled in Garden Grove, a nonprofit independent living center for the disabled founded in 1977. Roasters include Orange County Republican Party Chairman Tom Fuentes, Orange County state lobbyist Dennis Carpenter, business executive Paul Salata and Irvine Co. representative Kitty Leslie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
A nonprofit organization in Anaheim has begun a publicity campaign to make handicapped people in Orange County aware of special telephone services that may be available to them free. "There are a lot of good services for disabled people available in the state," said Brenda Premo, executive director of the Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled. "Unfortunately, the people who design these services don't think about the importance of marketing these services to the people who need them the most."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992 | TOM McQUEENEY
The Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled will recognize the city next month as the best local government agency in 1992 for providing services to the handicapped. The McIntosh Center will give the city its Apple of Our Eye service leader award during a Sept. 24 breakfast ceremony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1992 | AJOWA N. IFATEYO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert D. Cummings was 22 when diabetes disabled him, robbing him of sight in one eye and stealing all but a fraction in the other. Cummings, who was a college junior at the time, thought his life was over. Now, 21 years later, Cummings is blind but is sustaining a different kind of vision by dedicating his life to others with physical handicaps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1990
Richard Crandall, a Huntington Beach resident and founder of the Short Stature Foundation, received the Dayle McIntosh Center's "barrier buster" award Friday for his work enlightening the community about short people. The Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled honored Crandall and four other people and companies for their work in helping the physically and mentally handicapped to live independently.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | HERMAN WONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brenda Premo--former teen-age "troublemaker," longtime activist and now troop commander in the disabled-rights movement--has an appointment on the South Lawn of the White House on Thursday morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1990 | LISA MASCARO
Disabled people joined forces this week to protest Gov. George Deukmejian's proposed budget cuts by urging Orange County residents to call their state lawmakers and voice their opposition. Employees at the Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled in Anaheim, many of whom are themselves disabled, asked local officials and supporters to lend a hand at the telephone campaign by calling state representatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
A nonprofit organization in Anaheim has begun a publicity campaign to make handicapped people in Orange County aware of special telephone services that may be available to them free. "There are a lot of good services for disabled people available in the state," said Brenda Premo, executive director of the Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled. "Unfortunately, the people who design these services don't think about the importance of marketing these services to the people who need them the most."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1990 | LISA MASCARO
Disabled people joined forces this week to protest Gov. George Deukmejian's proposed budget cuts by urging Orange County residents to call their state lawmakers and voice their opposition. Employees at the Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled in Anaheim, many of whom are themselves disabled, asked local officials and supporters to lend a hand at the telephone campaign by calling state representatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1986
Millions of "Hands Stretching Across America" today will dramatically symbolize a significant change occurring in Orange County and most other U.S. localities. Today, the hungry and homeless are more visible on city streets than at any other time since the 1930s. Their numbers are growing--estimates range in the millions. The homeless and hungry cut across all age, ethnic, racial and religious groups. This highly diverse population, which requires a broad range of programs, includes homeless families (due to unemployment and lack of affordable housing)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1989 | JOE BEL BRUNO
A 40-unit apartment complex for handicapped residents will be built in Irvine under an agreement approved Tuesday night. The City Council voted unanimously to buy 2.3 acres for the apartments from the Irvine Co. for $450,000. The city will hold the property until the Dayle McIntosh Center, an Anaheim-based training program for disabled people, receives an expected $2.5 million from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1989
An Anaheim agency has received a $45,000 grant from the state Public Utilities Commission to provide training for disabled people. The Dayle McIntosh Center is one of 32 agencies funded by the commission through $16.5 million in penalties paid by Pacific Bell for marketing abuses that affected consumers with limited experience, poor English-speaking abilities and low incomes. Of the $16.5 million, $5 million is being distributed to local agencies.
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