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Daylight Savings Time

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NEWS
November 3, 1985
A bill (HR 2095) adding five weeks to Daylight Savings Time was passed by the House and sent to the Senate on a vote of 240 for and 157 against. Daylight time would begin four weeks earlier, on the first Sunday in April, and end one week later, on the first Sunday in November. Supporter Edward Markey (D-Mass.) said this would save energy, cut crime, spur commerce, reduce highway deaths, benefit persons afflicted with night blindness, and make "trick or treating . . . a little safer for children."
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NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Jimmy Orr
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford might have missed the "spring forward, fall back" memo: His Twitter account was used to wrongly advise his 130,000 followers to "turn your clocks back," instead of forward for daylight saving time this weekend. Ford, as everyone knows, gained international fame last year after media reports of public drunkenness and his admission to smoking crack cocaine. The mistaken tweet was later deleted without explanation. A new tweet was posted on his official account this evening  with the correct advice : "Daylight saving time starts this evening, turn your clocks forward and change batteries in smoke alarms.
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NEWS
January 24, 2001 | JASON SONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rather than complex bailouts or irritating rate hikes, there's a simpler way to ease California's energy crisis, says a state senator from Long Beach. The clock. Democrat Betty Karnette introduced a resolution Monday asking Congress to give California the option of remaining on daylight saving time all year instead of turning back clocks in the fall. Californians would have an hour more of sunlight a day and would use less energy around peak hours, which fall about 6 p.m., Karnette said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
The L.A. Marathon, being held Sunday morning, usually bring concerns about traffic and street closures. But this year, there is an added issue: The beginning of daylight saving time. Clocks should spin forward at 2 a.m. Sunday. Tracey Russell, the marathon's chief executive, told The Times' Rene Lynch Friday that marathon officials have been doing everything possible to get the word out to competitors: "Remember to set the clocks forward an hour. " RELATED: Hey L.A. Marathoners: Don't forget to change the clocks!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1998
Daylight savings time: an oxymoron. JAMES R. PRATLEY Rancho Bernardo
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2000
If California is so concerned about conserving electricity, why don't we go back to daylight savings time? DON DANIELSON Huntington Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1992
Daylight Savings Time ends Sunday at 2 a.m. Because many people wait until Sunday morning to set their clocks and VCRs to Standard Time, the TV listings in today's Calendar Section and Sunday's TV Times won't reflect the time change until 6 a.m. Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1992
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art will celebrate the arrival of daylight savings time and publicize the little-known fact that the museum is open on Friday nights until 9 p.m. with a special event tonight from 5-9. All of the museum's galleries and special exhibitions will be open. Docent tours of the exhibitions will be given at 7. Parking is free after 5 p.m. in the Wilshire Boulevard lot.
BOOKS
June 9, 1991
I am doing research for a book and would like to hear from anyone who was born on July 29, 1937, between 3:38 p.m. and 3:42 p.m. (Mountain Time); April 12, 1960 between 3:17 a.m. and 3:21 a.m. (Pacific Time); or on July 11, 1961, between 1:44 p.m. and 1:48 p.m. (Pacific Time). I do not know whether Daylight Savings Time was in effect, so there could be an additional hour difference when comparing with other time zones. MARGARET COOK, P.O. Box 1051, Foresthill, CA 95631
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
You may already know the answer to this: When does daylight saving time start? You may not know this: One California lawmaker wanted to move the clock forward not one but two hours in the spring -- doubling your daylight saving, for better or worse. That tidbit and more like it are in our quiz below. Zip through it and see how much you know about this annual occurrence. And if you didn't know the answer to the question at top, it's Sunday at 2 a.m.  Read more about the " anomaly in the temporal stream . " .articlerail, #pmad-rail {display:none;}
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Many Americans will be sleeping an extra hour when Daylight Saving Time ends - at 2 a.m. Sunday, to be exact. Even with the extra time to snooze, fewer people are fans of the clock-changing ritual. According to a recent Rasmussen Reports survey, 37% of Americans think the time change is worth the hassle, down from 45% last year. The "spring forward" and "fall back" practice was first implemented to save energy. Benjamin Franklin ("early to bed and early to rise") endorsed time change to save money on candles, and troops in World War I followed suit to save on coal.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a person healthy, wealthy and wise, goes the popular wisdom. If you believe that, then this is your weekend as clocks change and most of the U.S. falls back an hour. The change, officially the end of Daylight Saving Time, comes at 2 a.m. Sunday, when the clocks fall back to 1 a.m. In theory this should give everyone an extra hour of sleep, though how many hours people sleep is often the result of factors other than the clock. The changeover also takes place on the weekend, so what is a rest day can be used in part to offset the chronological changes that for some are akin to jet lag or traveling across a time zone.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Today is one of the most dangerous days of the year -- and the onset of daylight saving time is to blame. Though it began on Sunday, researchers have found the most acute effects occur on the first Monday after clocks spring forward. That's when about one-fifth of the world's population is forced to get up and go to school or work one hour earlier than their bodies are used to. (Unlike on Sunday, there's no option to just sleep in.)  Losing a single hour may seem trivial in the scheme of things, but medical researchers have spent a good amount of time investigating some of the health consequences of switching to daylight saving time.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Daylight saving time begins this weekend. From coast to coast, most Americans will dutifully "spring forward" by one hour early Sunday morning. We're told this helps save energy and allows us to enjoy more sunshine during the summer months. But a number of critics say this is all a big fat waste of time. Daylight saving time does nothing but create chaos and confusion, they say, and might actually waste more energy than it tries to save. It should be abandoned immediately, they contend.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Daylight saving time starts this weekend, as it does at roughly this time every year. It's when we "spring forward" one hour with the clocks so we can enjoy more sunshine at the end of the day. Sounds like a perfectly good thing, right? As benign as it might seem, daylight saving time has a dark side. Although many people quickly acclimate to the change, others suffer sleep setbacks, anxiety, missed appointments, even car accidents as a result. In extreme cases, they can spend days feeling as if something is "off," experts say. The jet-lag feeling will pass in time, said Helena Schotland, a clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Michigan and a researcher at the school's sleep disorders laboratory.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Daylight saving time is set to end Nov. 6, which supposedly is good for our body clocks (more sleep) but bad for those of us who don't want to let go of summer -- or at least not those long summer days. But these places flat-out don't crank the clock back an hour to standard time: Arizona (except the Navajo Indian Reservation), Hawaii , American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Add Saskatchewan, Canada, to the list too. The time change means that on Nov. 6, the sun will set at 4:57 p.m. in Los Angeles, 5:31 p.m. in Phoenix and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; 5:50 p.m. in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and 5:53 p.m. in Honolulu.
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