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Dayton Duncan

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NEWS
May 28, 1988 | United Press International
Dayton Duncan, deputy press secretary to Walter F. Mondale during his 1984 presidential campaign, has been named national press secretary for the Dukakis presidential campaign. Duncan, 38, will join the Democratic front-runner's staff in mid-June, Dukakis' campaign office said Thursday. Duncan served from 1979 to 1983 as press secretary and chief of staff to the late New Hampshire Gov. Hugh Gallen. He lives in Roxbury, N.H. Duncan replaces Patricia O'Brien, who resigned last November.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Scott Timberg
In a sense, Ken Burns' new documentary is the photographic negative of the one he delivered in 2009: Instead of swooning full-color shots of azure lakes and soaring mountains, his new film is made of images that could come from the dark side of the moon. In some of them, the parched land tells its own silent story. In others, we see bleached-out shots of people, in overalls, scowling. Or children in gas masks, looking like humanoid visitors from another world. And while "The National Parks," from 2009, recounted the tale of triumph, his new film is not nearly so life-affirming.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Scott Timberg
In a sense, Ken Burns' new documentary is the photographic negative of the one he delivered in 2009: Instead of swooning full-color shots of azure lakes and soaring mountains, his new film is made of images that could come from the dark side of the moon. In some of them, the parched land tells its own silent story. In others, we see bleached-out shots of people, in overalls, scowling. Or children in gas masks, looking like humanoid visitors from another world. And while "The National Parks," from 2009, recounted the tale of triumph, his new film is not nearly so life-affirming.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | Deanne Stillman, Stillman is the author of "Joshua Tree: Desolation Tango," among other books.
Ours is a house divided -- not by red and blue states but by something more essential: our relationship to what's wild. Should we leave it alone? Cherish it and make sure it lasts? Or continue to wall it up, fence it off and take shiny things from it so we can all get rich? Fortunately, citizens such as John Muir, George Bird Grinnell and Marjory Stoneman Douglas have had the courage and foresight to battle for preservation of what was once commonly known as "scenery." The wilderness had them at hello; they understood that we need the beauty and solitude of open space.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The names littered through the pages of "Grass Roots" are familiar, but you may not remember exactly why: Babbitt, Du Pont, Haig, Jackson, Robertson, even Paul Simon--the senator, that is, not the singer. By now, you may have forgotten that each of these men braved the snows of New Hampshire in pursuit of his party's presidential nomination in 1988.
BOOKS
December 30, 2001 | JUSTIN KAPLAN
This superbly illustrated biography of Mark Twain, a companion volume to Ken Burns' four-hour PBS television series scheduled for January, documents a life that continues to have the compelling power of myth and legend. The novelist and critic William Dean Howells called Twain "the Lincoln of our literature" and said he never tired of hearing the "Arabian Nights story" of his friend's life. From a memorable boyhood in Hannibal, Mo.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | Deanne Stillman, Stillman is the author of "Joshua Tree: Desolation Tango," among other books.
Ours is a house divided -- not by red and blue states but by something more essential: our relationship to what's wild. Should we leave it alone? Cherish it and make sure it lasts? Or continue to wall it up, fence it off and take shiny things from it so we can all get rich? Fortunately, citizens such as John Muir, George Bird Grinnell and Marjory Stoneman Douglas have had the courage and foresight to battle for preservation of what was once commonly known as "scenery." The wilderness had them at hello; they understood that we need the beauty and solitude of open space.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Republican presidential candidate George Bush on Wednesday declined an invitation to appear with Democratic counterpart Michael Dukakis on the ABC program "Nightline" after Dukakis had accepted the offer. The network invited both candidates to "engage in an open-ended discussion concerning the issues being raised in the 1988 presidential campaign," said Roone Arledge, ABC News president.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2012 | By Martin Miller
Ken Burns came to the summer TV press tour Sunday afternoon bearing clips from his latest PBS documentary, “The Dust Bowl,”  a four-hour, two-part film that will air in mid-November. On a panel that also included writer and producer Dayton Duncan and Dust Bowl survivor Cal Crabill, Burns called the event that led to an exodus from Oklahoma  to California during the 1930s “the greatest manmade ecological disaster in U.S. history.” “This is a cautionary tale,” said Burns of the disaster, which coincided with much of the Great Depression, adding the documentary is not “inspirational.” In one of the clips, a survivor talked about the huge clouds of dust that would blacken the skies for as long as 24 hours.
BOOKS
December 30, 2001 | JUSTIN KAPLAN
This superbly illustrated biography of Mark Twain, a companion volume to Ken Burns' four-hour PBS television series scheduled for January, documents a life that continues to have the compelling power of myth and legend. The novelist and critic William Dean Howells called Twain "the Lincoln of our literature" and said he never tired of hearing the "Arabian Nights story" of his friend's life. From a memorable boyhood in Hannibal, Mo.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The names littered through the pages of "Grass Roots" are familiar, but you may not remember exactly why: Babbitt, Du Pont, Haig, Jackson, Robertson, even Paul Simon--the senator, that is, not the singer. By now, you may have forgotten that each of these men braved the snows of New Hampshire in pursuit of his party's presidential nomination in 1988.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | United Press International
Dayton Duncan, deputy press secretary to Walter F. Mondale during his 1984 presidential campaign, has been named national press secretary for the Dukakis presidential campaign. Duncan, 38, will join the Democratic front-runner's staff in mid-June, Dukakis' campaign office said Thursday. Duncan served from 1979 to 1983 as press secretary and chief of staff to the late New Hampshire Gov. Hugh Gallen. He lives in Roxbury, N.H. Duncan replaces Patricia O'Brien, who resigned last November.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2003 | From Associated Press
The three-year celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Lewis and Clark expedition formally opened Saturday at the home of Thomas Jefferson, the president who set the exploratory mission in motion. The event at Monticello marked the 200th anniversary of Jefferson's letter, written at the estate outside Charlottesville, asking Congress to appropriate $2,500 to fund the expedition to explore the recently acquired Louisiana Purchase.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2003 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
After fixing his gaze on such epic areas of Americana as jazz, baseball and the Civil War, documentary wizard Ken Burns tonight tackles a topic far narrower in scope, yet countrywide in scale. It's a story that begins May 19, 1903, with a wager in a San Francisco club and ends 10 weeks and 5,600 miles later in Manhattan, capping the first coast-to-coast journey via that newfangled contraption called the automobile. But "Horatio's Drive: America's First Road Trip" (9 p.m.
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