Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDdt
IN THE NEWS

Ddt

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | Associated Press
A plan to cap a vast, long-neglected deposit of the pesticide DDT on the ocean floor off Southern California got its first public airing Tuesday -- nearly four decades after the poison was banned from use. The estimated $36-million proposal by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency calls for a cover of sand and silt to be placed over the most contaminated part of the estimated 17-square-mile area declared a Superfund site in 1996.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists have discovered a link between DDT and Alzheimer's disease. In a small but intriguing study, researchers found that, on average, people with Alzheimer's disease had more of the DDT metabolite DDE in their blood serum than a control group in a similar age range. "DDE can last in the body for a number of years," said lead author Jason Richardson of Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. "When you are looking at DDE levels, it is basically a snapshot of a person's lifetime exposure to DDT as well as DDE in the environment.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
October 23, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Exposure to the pesticide DDT could be playing a role in high rates of obesity three generations later, a new study says. Scientists injected pregnant rats with DDT and found no change in their levels of obesity or their offspring. But by the third generation, more than half of the rats (think of them as the great-grandchildren) showed dramatically higher levels of fat and weight gain, even though they were never exposed to the pesticide themselves. "Here is an ancestral exposure in your great-grandmother, which is passed on to you and you're going to pass on to your grandchildren," said Michael Skinner, a professor of biological sciences at Washington State University who led the research published in the journal BMC Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Decades after industrial waste dumping turned part of Southern California's seafloor into a toxic hot spot, scientists have dredged up a mystery. Chemicals fouling the ocean off the Palos Verdes Peninsula seem to be going away without being cleaned up. Samples taken from the sediment suggest more than 100 metric tons of the banned pesticide DDT and industrial compounds known as polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, have vanished from one of the country's most hazardous sites, almost a 90% drop in just five years.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists have discovered a link between DDT and Alzheimer's disease. In a small but intriguing study, researchers found that, on average, people with Alzheimer's disease had more of the DDT metabolite DDE in their blood serum than a control group in a similar age range. "DDE can last in the body for a number of years," said lead author Jason Richardson of Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. "When you are looking at DDE levels, it is basically a snapshot of a person's lifetime exposure to DDT as well as DDE in the environment.
OPINION
February 3, 2007
Re "Waiting for the DDT tide to turn," Jan. 28 The Times continues to dish out questionable information about DDT to the American public. DDT has never been adequately linked to cancer of any form and has not been shown to be conclusively harmful to those who ingest it -- hence the "probable human carcinogen" label. Millions have died and continue to die from malaria because of the deceptive information put out on this topic. PHILLIP LYLE Irvine
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Federal workers Wednesday began digging up the frontyard of the first of about 25 homes contaminated with DDT in the Harbor Gateway area. The Environmental Protection Agency plans to remove and replace six feet of contaminated soil from frontyards on the west side of Kenwood Avenue. Several residents of the neighborhood have been temporarily relocated during the cleanup, which could take as long as four months, said EPA spokeswoman Lisa Fasano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1994 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise move, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Wednesday that it is offering to move 18 more families to hotels while it removes DDT-tainted soil from two back yards near a Superfund site east of Torrance. That means up to 23 families may be relocated at federal expense during the two-week project, which is expected to start next week.
NEWS
April 28, 1987
Years of waste dumping into Los Angeles Harbor by a DDT manufacturer has left the San Pedro Canyon between the Palos Verdes Peninsula and Santa Catalina Island with the nation's highest levels of the banned pesticide, according to a preliminary report on coastal waters prepared for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The study showed the count was 621 parts per billion. The water off Seal Beach and off San Diego Bay were also found to be among those with significant pollutants.
NEWS
March 26, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a partial settlement of the nation's largest case of offshore chemical contamination, the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts and 155 other municipalities agreed Tuesday to pay $45.7 million to help clean up the world's largest known deposit of DDT, off the Palos Verdes Peninsula. The amount, which represents about 20% of the estimated cost of cleanup, would also help restore damaged fish and wildlife populations. Filed in U.S.
SCIENCE
October 23, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Exposure to the pesticide DDT could be playing a role in high rates of obesity three generations later, a new study says. Scientists injected pregnant rats with DDT and found no change in their levels of obesity or their offspring. But by the third generation, more than half of the rats (think of them as the great-grandchildren) showed dramatically higher levels of fat and weight gain, even though they were never exposed to the pesticide themselves. "Here is an ancestral exposure in your great-grandmother, which is passed on to you and you're going to pass on to your grandchildren," said Michael Skinner, a professor of biological sciences at Washington State University who led the research published in the journal BMC Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2010 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
New Yorkers aren't the only ones coping with creepy, crawly bloodsuckers. Bedbugs have turned up in the Golden Triangle retail district of Beverly Hills and inside homes and apartments in more than two dozen local communities. "It's really all over the county," said Angelo J. Bellomo, director of environmental health for the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. After noticing an increase in reports from tenants, property owners and businesses, public health officials last spring began tracking reports of bedbugs and later posted public notices about how to prevent and treat infestations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010 | By Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
Though they might not inspire the same romantic feeling as the swallows returning to Capistrano, ospreys have begun to spread their wings — and domain — in Orange County. A female osprey reared on a man-made platform in Upper Newport Bay recently hatched a chick at another specialized platform a few miles away in Irvine. Experts say this is a positive sign for a species that for decades had no known nests in Southern California. The ospreys, birds of prey once threatened by hunters and the pesticide DDT, have been watched over locally by a group of dedicated conservationists who are just now understanding the species' breeding patterns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
A growing population of American bald eagles in Channel Islands National Park might eventually start feasting on rare seabirds and endangered island foxes, researchers reported Monday. The warning was based on an extensive analysis of the shifting diets of the opportunistic foragers from the Pleistocene era, about 20,000 years ago, to the late 1960s, when they were decimated by widespread use of DDT. It was reported in the online Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
Federal officials announced today that they are removing the brown pelican from the endangered species list, capping a century-long recovery that started under President Theodore Roosevelt. The brown pelican is an avian fixture in Southern California and along the Gulf of Mexico from Texas to Florida, where Roosevelt established the first national wildlife refuge on Pelican Island to protect the bird from human slaughter. It is an icon in Louisiana, where it is the state bird and where Interior Department officials assembled today at the Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge near New Orleans to proclaim the brown pelican "fully recovered" and no longer in need of federal protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | Associated Press
A plan to cap a vast, long-neglected deposit of the pesticide DDT on the ocean floor off Southern California got its first public airing Tuesday -- nearly four decades after the poison was banned from use. The estimated $36-million proposal by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency calls for a cover of sand and silt to be placed over the most contaminated part of the estimated 17-square-mile area declared a Superfund site in 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1994 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials announced Thursday that 25 families in a Torrance-area neighborhood will be kept in temporary housing for up to six months at federal expense while investigators examine DDT soil contamination that is more extensive than previously thought. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1995 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $7-million plan to remove DDT-tainted soil from a South Bay neighborhood was unveiled Friday by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials who said it would allow most or all of 33 relocated families to return to their homes this fall. The plan was criticized by community leader Cynthia Babich, who has repeatedly called on the federal government to permanently relocate families away from 204th Street east of Torrance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2009 | Jeff Gottlieb
The federal Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday proposed spending at least $36 million to clean up the world's largest deposit of banned pesticide DDT, which lies 200 feet underwater off the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Montrose Chemical Corp., which was based near Torrance, released 110 tons of DDT and 10 tons of toxic PCBs into the sewers from 1947 through 1971. The chemicals then flowed into the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2008 | Andrew Blankstein
More than a generation has passed since manufacturers in Southern California dumped large quantities of the pesticide DDT and the chemical PCB into the Los Angeles County sewer system, which spilled them onto the ocean floor off the Palos Verdes Peninsula. But a Cal State Long Beach lecturer and a student have found that the toxic chemicals continue to exact a toll on the local marine environment, as shown by high concentrations present in marine mammals, including seals and sea lions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|