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WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Notorious drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, convicted in the 1985 kidnap and murder of an American narcotics agent, was freed from prison Friday after serving 28 years for a crime that vexed U.S.-Mexican relations for decades. Special Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena was working for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, based in the city of Guadalajara, when Caro Quintero allegedly ordered him killed. Camarena went missing in February 1985, as he left the U.S. consulate.
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WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- The former boss of slain DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena says the 1985 killing was a game changer, both in how the U.S. worked with Mexico on narcotics enforcement and how the traffickers themselves operated. James Kuykendall, who served as resident agent in charge in the Drug Enforcement Administration's office in Guadalajara in the 1980s, recalled Camarena's slaying after learning that the drug lord convicted in the crime was freed from prison Friday on a technicality.
OPINION
August 7, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Even before former National Security Agency consultant Edward Snowden exposed the breathtaking extent of the intelligence agency's electronic surveillance programs, civil libertarians worried that information obtained as part of anti-terrorism investigations might find its way to the criminal justice system and that Americans would be tried and convicted on evidence obtained without warrants, in violation of the 4th Amendment. Is that happening? As with much about the NSA, it is hard to be sure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2013 | By Tony Perry
A college student mistakenly left in a Drug Enforcement Administration interrogation room for five days will receive $4.1 million from the government in a settlement in advance of a lawsuit. The settlement was announced Tuesday in San Diego by the student, Daniel Chong, 25, and his lawyer, Eugene Iredale. "It was an accident, a really bad, horrible accident," said Chong, who added that he now suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder. The bizarre event in April 2012 began when Chong, an engineering student at UC San Diego, went to a house near campus to smoke marijuana with friends and found himself swept up in a DEA raid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - A college student mistakenly left in a Drug Enforcement Administration interrogation room for five days without food or water will receive $4.1 million from the federal government to settle his claim for maltreatment. The settlement, approved by the Department of Justice, was announced Tuesday in San Diego by the student, Daniel Chong, 25, and his lawyer, Eugene Iredale. “It was an accident, a really, really bad, horrible accident,” Chong said. Iredale said Chong has undergone intensive psychotherapy and been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - A college student mistakenly left in a Drug Enforcement Administration interrogation room for five days without food or water will receive $4.1 million from the federal government to settle his claim for maltreatment. The settlement, approved by the Department of Justice, was announced Tuesday in San Diego by the student, Daniel Chong, 25, and his lawyer, Eugene Iredale. "It was an accident, a really, really bad, horrible accident," Chong said. Iredale said Chong has undergone intensive psychotherapy and been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
USA might want to consider changing its tag line from "Characters Welcome" to "Welcome to Summer. " Beginning with the groundbreaking "Monk," which premiered in July 2002, the NBC/Universal-owned network has staked a successful claim to the months previously synonymous with reruns. During the once slow summer season, they've built a brand that combines wit, sentiment and suspense, and often in beach-friendly locales. The network, known for its "blue sky programming," has six scripted dramas this year - five returning and one new. As it enters its final season, the terrific CIA-centric, Miami-based "Burn Notice" is now followed by the new FBI drama "Graceland," which premieres Thursday.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
A West Hollywood doctor pleaded not guilty Monday to federal charges of illegally prescribing powerful painkillers to patients, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles James William Eisenberg, 72, is accused of writing more than 1,200 prescriptions for addictive painkillers after the Drug Enforcement Administration revoked his authority to prescribe controlled substances. Eisenberg's bail was set at $200,000, with home detention ordered, according to the U.S. attorney's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2013 | Sandy Banks
Carol Champommier vs. the United States of America . That's not a phrase that Carol Champommier ever expected to see. She's a schoolteacher, not an activist; a rule follower, not a renegade. But Champommier is suing the United States because a federal agent shot her son to death in a parking lot encounter that played out like a scene from an action movie, where two unrelated story lines coalesce in violent tragedy. Government lawyers contend the shooting three years ago was reasonable - that 18-year-old Zac Champommier tried to run down an officer with his car, creating a "deadly, immediate threat" that justified gunfire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts, Los Angeles Times
An Orange County doctor who often saw patients at Starbucks coffeehouses has agreed to serve at least eight years in federal prison for illegally selling prescriptions for powerful painkillers and other drugs, according to court records. Alvin Ming-Czech Yee, 44, of Mission Viejo routinely wrote prescriptions for highly abused medications to patients with no legitimate need for them, authorities have alleged in court papers. Yee and his attorney could not be reached for comment.
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