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Dead People

NEWS
November 5, 1992 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two and a half weeks ago, Eric Fuller, an Altadena gang member, was sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole for murdering a rival's pregnant girlfriend and her unborn fetus. In the nights that followed, northwest Pasadena and Altadena were rocked by a series of drive-by and walk-up shootings, mostly aimed at gang bangers and police. Three young men died. A man and teen-age girl were injured. Three Pasadena police officers were shot at but none was hurt.
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WORLD
June 25, 2011 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
Syrian security officers opened fire on protesters Friday, leaving as many as 20 dead, as people poured into the streets across the nation in defiance of President Bashar Assad and his promise of limited reform, according to opposition activists. Meanwhile, the European Union slapped fresh sanctions on Syria and its principal regional ally, Iran, which has been accused of collaborating in the crackdown against protesters. Friday's anti-government marches, some tied to Friday prayers, reportedly were some of the largest in the 3-month-old protest movement that has convulsed the strategically situated Arab nation.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Brush passes. Dead drops. Secret electronic messages. All under the watchful eye of the FBI. Documents released Monday, including photos, videos and papers, offered new details about the FBI's decade-long investigation into a ring of Russian sleeper agents who, U.S. officials say, were trying to burrow their way into American society to learn secrets from people in power. The investigation was code-named Operation Ghost Stories because six of the 10 agents had assumed the identities of dead people.
MAGAZINE
April 5, 1992 | SHELDON TEITELBAUM, Sheldon Teitelbaum is a senior staff writer for The Jerusalem Report. His last article for this magazine was on "Star Trek."
IN 1968, AN IMPOSSIBLY BRASH 33-YEAR-OLD CANADIAN POET NAMED Leonard Cohen declined his country's most prestigious literary prize, the Governor General's Award. In fact, he didn't even bother showing up, sending a terse telegram to be read by the master of ceremonies. "Though much in me craves this award," it said, "the poems absolutely forbid it." He was just being a smart-ass, Cohen now acknowledges, though why, he says, is no more clear to him now than it was then.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1994 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County Superior Court judge ruled Wednesday that an evangelical preacher had conned an heiress out of nearly $500,000 and ordered him to repay the money plus $250,000 in punitive damages. Mel Tari, 48, of Dana Point, an evangelist and author of several Christian books, must repay Christine Kline, 41, of Denver for the small fortune she signed over to him. Kline, who had inherited Capital Printing Co.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2004 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
As two federal judges in Ohio prepared to rule on lawsuits contending that the state's procedure for challenging an individual's right to vote is unconstitutional, the Justice Department weighed in with an unusual letter brief supporting the statute. Assistant Atty. Gen. R. Alexander Acosta sent a brief during the weekend to U.S. District Judge Susan J. Dlott, who held a rare Sunday night hearing in one of the cases, a lawsuit filed late last week by Donald and Marian Spencer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2003 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
As if he hasn't shouldered enough bad news of late, club owner Sonny Buxton braces himself for more. He wipes down his bar as yet another musician strides in with a bulletin, details of another jazz casualty. It was pianist Al Plank today. Two days ago, it was drummer Babatunde Olatunji who passed away. "Did you hear?" asks bassist Michael Zisman, as he unloads his gear for tonight's gig. And on Sunday it will be the end for Jazz at Pearl's itself, the city's last full-time jazz club.
MAGAZINE
July 9, 2006 | Brian Alexander, Brian Alexander is a contributing editor at Glamour and writes for MSNBC, Outside and others. He is the author of "Rapture: How Biotech Became the New Religion."
I have traveled to the Palm Springs Life Extension Institute in search of Dr. Edmund Chein. Instead I find Tiffany Caranci. Tiffany is 20 years old and looks exactly how you might expect a 20-year-old named Tiffany to look: platform heels, low-slung skirt, hair streaked blond and black. She's brazenly sexy, and so very young. I am a man and not very young.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | MARY FOSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The planes rumbling off runway 10 still shake houses in the Morningside subdivision and stir E.V. Weems' saddest memories. His house was the first one hit by the cartwheeling jetliner a decade ago Thursday. Ten years have blunted the pain of that rainy afternoon when a Boeing 727 slammed into the streets of the close-knit neighborhood. All 146 people on board were killed, along with two adults and six children on the ground. "It's better, but I guess it left a lasting effect on all of us.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
We were just settling in the other evening for some utterly inoffensive television viewing (reruns of "The Big Bang Theory," if memory serves) when our living room was invaded by a zombie. Yes, it was Audrey Hepburn, dead these 21 years, digitally dug up from the grave and  reanimated to shill for Dove chocolates . You may already have seen this commercial, which began running on Oscars night and is now moving into wider rotation. (Check it out at the bottom of this post.)  Dove and the commercial producers are inordinately proud of their achievement.
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