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Dead People

NEWS
November 5, 1992 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two and a half weeks ago, Eric Fuller, an Altadena gang member, was sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole for murdering a rival's pregnant girlfriend and her unborn fetus. In the nights that followed, northwest Pasadena and Altadena were rocked by a series of drive-by and walk-up shootings, mostly aimed at gang bangers and police. Three young men died. A man and teen-age girl were injured. Three Pasadena police officers were shot at but none was hurt.
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WORLD
June 25, 2011 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
Syrian security officers opened fire on protesters Friday, leaving as many as 20 dead, as people poured into the streets across the nation in defiance of President Bashar Assad and his promise of limited reform, according to opposition activists. Meanwhile, the European Union slapped fresh sanctions on Syria and its principal regional ally, Iran, which has been accused of collaborating in the crackdown against protesters. Friday's anti-government marches, some tied to Friday prayers, reportedly were some of the largest in the 3-month-old protest movement that has convulsed the strategically situated Arab nation.
NEWS
August 9, 2009
Early on the morning of Aug. 6, 1945, pilot Paul Tibbets and his crew took off from the Pacific island of Tinian in a B-29 bomber named the Enola Gay. Hours later, they dropped Little Boy, the first atomic bomb used in warfare, on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Three days later, on Aug. 9, the U.S. dropped a second nuclear bomb on Nagasaki. Today, the world is still struggling with how to control the weapons unleashed 64 years ago. Nine countries are known or are widely believed to have nuclear weapons capability, with Iran working to develop it. On this anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki, we are publishing firsthand testimony from the nuclear era's first victims.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Brush passes. Dead drops. Secret electronic messages. All under the watchful eye of the FBI. Documents released Monday, including photos, videos and papers, offered new details about the FBI's decade-long investigation into a ring of Russian sleeper agents who, U.S. officials say, were trying to burrow their way into American society to learn secrets from people in power. The investigation was code-named Operation Ghost Stories because six of the 10 agents had assumed the identities of dead people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1994 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County Superior Court judge ruled Wednesday that an evangelical preacher had conned an heiress out of nearly $500,000 and ordered him to repay the money plus $250,000 in punitive damages. Mel Tari, 48, of Dana Point, an evangelist and author of several Christian books, must repay Christine Kline, 41, of Denver for the small fortune she signed over to him. Kline, who had inherited Capital Printing Co.
NEWS
October 10, 2004 | Ben Dobbin, Associated Press Writer
Fifteen years after Salva Dut fled in terror into the African wilderness, losing all contact with his family, a sketchy communique from a cousin reached him in his home in faraway America. "I've found your father," the e-mail read. The father, Mawien Dut, had shown up seriously ill at a United Nations hospital deep in a Sudanese jungle. His stomach was riddled with parasites, the result of drinking contaminated water.
MAGAZINE
July 9, 2006 | Brian Alexander, Brian Alexander is a contributing editor at Glamour and writes for MSNBC, Outside and others. He is the author of "Rapture: How Biotech Became the New Religion."
I have traveled to the Palm Springs Life Extension Institute in search of Dr. Edmund Chein. Instead I find Tiffany Caranci. Tiffany is 20 years old and looks exactly how you might expect a 20-year-old named Tiffany to look: platform heels, low-slung skirt, hair streaked blond and black. She's brazenly sexy, and so very young. I am a man and not very young.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | MARY FOSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The planes rumbling off runway 10 still shake houses in the Morningside subdivision and stir E.V. Weems' saddest memories. His house was the first one hit by the cartwheeling jetliner a decade ago Thursday. Ten years have blunted the pain of that rainy afternoon when a Boeing 727 slammed into the streets of the close-knit neighborhood. All 146 people on board were killed, along with two adults and six children on the ground. "It's better, but I guess it left a lasting effect on all of us.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
God is dead. People used to say that a lot in the 1950s. Academic types, French existentialists. I was just a kid. I didn't know whether they meant that there had been a God once and he had gone poof! or that he hadn't ever existed and it was our naive belief in him that had died. I still don't. Back then, I wasn't sure they knew. They seemed to mean it both ways at once, which was logically impossible. In fiction, necessarily, the idea was less abstract, more corporeal.
NEWS
May 21, 2001 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harry Sawyer, election supervisor in Key West, was stunned when Florida officials sent him a list of 150 convicted felons to cut from county voter rolls in mid-1999. Among those named: an election employee, another worker's husband--and Sawyer's own father. None was a felon. "It was just a mess," Sawyer said. More mess was to come.
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