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Deanne Stillman

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May 1, 1988 | Karen Stabiner, Stabiner appears regularly in the Book Review column , Storytellers. and
This may be the definitive Hollywood novel: Although it isn't about people who make movies, it is perfectly suited to the 12-second attention span endemic to the industry. Humorist Deanne Stillman delivers exactly what she promises--scenes, dialogue only, with very little connective prose.
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June 29, 2008 | Pam Houston, Pam Houston is the author of "Cowboys Are My Weakness" and "Sight Hound," among other books. She lives in Creede, Colo., near the headwaters of the Rio Grande.
DEANNE STILLMAN loves the desert. It is, she writes, "my beat and my passion," a place where city life fades away, her thoughts vanish and she hears things: "The beating of wings. The scratching of lizard. The crack of tortoise egg. The whisper of stories that want to be told." Her 2001 book, "Twentynine Palms: A True Story of Murder, Marines, and the Mojave," told one of those stories, of the violent murder of two local girls who had been "sliced up" by a Marine in the desert.
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MAGAZINE
June 21, 1992
If Deanne Stillman ("Cairo by the Mohave," Guest Bites Town, May 10) wants to do a brilliant, ironic, erudite, warmed-over takeoff on Aldoux Huxley and F. Scott Fitzgerald, why doesn't she skip the comparisons to Rome and Cairo and visit Athens. It's an unincorporated area just south and east of Inglewood, not too far from Watts. Not just now, though. They're a little impatient at present with ancient history. FRED SCIFERS Downey
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
THE last time Los Angeles writer Deanne Stillman published a book on the high desert, she was met with angry editorials in a local paper, a bitter letter-writing campaign and complaints from locals. She couldn't write, her hair was strange, what did she know? More important, some desert-dwellers said, her dark view of the place would drain the area of its lifeblood -- tourism. That book, "Twentynine Palms," a tense bestseller praised by Hunter S.
MAGAZINE
June 13, 1999
Deanne Stillman's column about the so-called "massage therapist for babies" ("Helping People of All Ages to Sleep Like Babies," SoCal P.O.V., May 9) sent my spine out of whack. "Feeling for the pulse of cerebrospinal fluid"? Puh-leeze! The only thing Lynne Oyama "felt" was a doofus willing to embrace her silly wishful thinking. Annie Katz Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
March 22, 1992
Your piece on Camille Paglia was par for the course ("The Many Masks of Camille Paglia," by Deanne Stillman, Feb. 16). I have read several such profiles and the writers, yours included, invariably link her with a "new right" or the "feminist backlash." But Paglia is not easily categorized, nor is her popularity due solely to clever media manipulation. She is a breath of fresh air: tough, original and wildly audacious. Her contemporaries, meanwhile, are indistinguishable clones, all repeating the same tired company line.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2004
I just finished reading Deanne Stillman's wonderful, well-written and enjoyable article on horses in film history. I was very impressed that she chose the scene from "Monte Walsh." Has she ever seen the clip from the movie "Tumbleweeds" with William S. Hart? Without a doubt the greatest riding sequence in western movie history ... and Bill does this at the age of 57! The way that horse ran in the scenes took my breath away. One other note: Stillman did not mention comedy with horses.
OPINION
May 6, 2005
Re "Respect, Please, for Malibu's Best Gal," Commentary, May 2: I'm not taking anything away from the novella "Gidget." In fact I'm thrilled that "the whole town" (Malibu) is reading anything. I take issue with Deanne Stillman's assertion that "Gidget," the book, "altered the course" of American history. The tipping point was the Hollywood movie, under the same name. It was "Gidget," the movie, starring James Darren, Sandra Dee and Cliff Robertson, that drew legions to California beaches.
MAGAZINE
May 6, 2001
Deanne Stillman does not describe the desert--a sublime, harsh and forbidding environment, a place of endless space and silence, a place of extremes ("Deconstructing Paradise," April 8). The desert is not a weekend retreat under a bougainvillea branch, all "pretty pictures and scents and sounds." Her naive desire for "its endlessly warm and open arms" merely reflects the human longing for a return to paradise. Helena Bongartz Twentynine Palms Stillman or her editors should have come to know the children of the working class a little better.
MAGAZINE
May 13, 2001
The Twentynine Palms that I live in doesn't resemble Deanne Stillman's description and, indeed, is so different that I can only assume that her comments were the result of having been in the sun too long ("Deconstructing Paradise," April 8). She has made a lot of very nice people up here hopping mad! This is a town where people speak to you everywhere you go. The Marines are a welcome, polite and helpful presence in the community. It's a place with a sense of history that people want to maintain, and it includes retirees, artists, families, single people and the military.
OPINION
May 6, 2005
Re "Respect, Please, for Malibu's Best Gal," Commentary, May 2: I'm not taking anything away from the novella "Gidget." In fact I'm thrilled that "the whole town" (Malibu) is reading anything. I take issue with Deanne Stillman's assertion that "Gidget," the book, "altered the course" of American history. The tipping point was the Hollywood movie, under the same name. It was "Gidget," the movie, starring James Darren, Sandra Dee and Cliff Robertson, that drew legions to California beaches.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2004
I just finished reading Deanne Stillman's wonderful, well-written and enjoyable article on horses in film history. I was very impressed that she chose the scene from "Monte Walsh." Has she ever seen the clip from the movie "Tumbleweeds" with William S. Hart? Without a doubt the greatest riding sequence in western movie history ... and Bill does this at the age of 57! The way that horse ran in the scenes took my breath away. One other note: Stillman did not mention comedy with horses.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2004
Thank you for your wonderful article "Riding Into Film History" by Deanne Stillman (March 7). My family and I had just been to the opening night of "Hidalgo" after weeks of anticipation. It was a perfect family movie for everyone despite its PG-13 rating. It was especially wonderful for my daughter (who is 8) and me as we love riding horses together and share the wonder of their majestic and mysterious beauty. "In wildness is the preservation of the world," Thoreau once said. To many, the freedom and grace of the wild mustang symbolizes this preservation and is something that resonates deep within those of us who love this noble and beautiful creature.
MAGAZINE
October 20, 2002 | Deanne Stillman last wrote for the magazine about researching her book "Twentynine Palms: A True Story of Murder, Marines in the Mojave" (William Morrow), a Los Angeles Times selection as one of the top nonfiction books for 2001.
I know, I know. The coyote killed your cat, attacked your dog, ate your daughter's homework, your wife's Palm Pilot and your Greg Norman signature golf tees, ripped your pet bunny to shreds, devoured your chickens, wiped out your sheep farmer brother-in-law's spring lamb population and gorged for days on hundreds of priceless black Angus cattle, thereby reducing the country's livestock supply by a third and simultaneously quadrupling the price of a good steak, before a holiday weekend no less.
BOOKS
June 3, 2001 | BARRY SIEGEL, Barry Siegel is the author of "Actual Innocence" and "The Perfect Witness." He is a national correspondent for The Times
Of late, true crime has fallen into disrepute as a literary genre, yet at its best this form provides something invaluable: a window into an unfamiliar world. Sudden deaths and heated murder trials give us more than a vicarious glimpse of violence. They give us the opportunity to behold people and places and ways of life that otherwise might remain hidden or purposefully ignored.
MAGAZINE
May 13, 2001
The Twentynine Palms that I live in doesn't resemble Deanne Stillman's description and, indeed, is so different that I can only assume that her comments were the result of having been in the sun too long ("Deconstructing Paradise," April 8). She has made a lot of very nice people up here hopping mad! This is a town where people speak to you everywhere you go. The Marines are a welcome, polite and helpful presence in the community. It's a place with a sense of history that people want to maintain, and it includes retirees, artists, families, single people and the military.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2004
Thank you for your wonderful article "Riding Into Film History" by Deanne Stillman (March 7). My family and I had just been to the opening night of "Hidalgo" after weeks of anticipation. It was a perfect family movie for everyone despite its PG-13 rating. It was especially wonderful for my daughter (who is 8) and me as we love riding horses together and share the wonder of their majestic and mysterious beauty. "In wildness is the preservation of the world," Thoreau once said. To many, the freedom and grace of the wild mustang symbolizes this preservation and is something that resonates deep within those of us who love this noble and beautiful creature.
MAGAZINE
December 18, 1994
Thanks to Deanne Stillman for her compelling profile of Gloria Allred, distinctive in its lack of Vanity Fair hype ("G-L-O-R-I-A," Nov. 13). Stillman's keen, witty and objective take on a controversial public figure gave me the rare impression that I wasn't being fed a mouthful of gaff. I've had friends seek Allred's counsel as well as cross swords with her. I've always considered her choice of battles noble but thought that her love of self-congratulatory personal press undermined those causes.
MAGAZINE
May 6, 2001
Deanne Stillman does not describe the desert--a sublime, harsh and forbidding environment, a place of endless space and silence, a place of extremes ("Deconstructing Paradise," April 8). The desert is not a weekend retreat under a bougainvillea branch, all "pretty pictures and scents and sounds." Her naive desire for "its endlessly warm and open arms" merely reflects the human longing for a return to paradise. Helena Bongartz Twentynine Palms Stillman or her editors should have come to know the children of the working class a little better.
MAGAZINE
June 13, 1999
Deanne Stillman's column about the so-called "massage therapist for babies" ("Helping People of All Ages to Sleep Like Babies," SoCal P.O.V., May 9) sent my spine out of whack. "Feeling for the pulse of cerebrospinal fluid"? Puh-leeze! The only thing Lynne Oyama "felt" was a doofus willing to embrace her silly wishful thinking. Annie Katz Los Angeles
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