Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDear Amy
IN THE NEWS

Dear Amy

ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2009
Dear Amy: My daughter is coming to our house for the holidays, bringing her three small children. The dinner is at my mom and dad's house. She asked to bring her "boyfriend." They knew each other many years ago and have recently reconnected but have had only e-mail and phone contact. I said it was fine for her to bring him to dinner, and her grandmother agreed. Now we find out that she wants him to stay with her as a guest at her grandmother's house for the entire time they're here.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2009
Dear Amy: I work for a lovely couple at a family-run educational nonprofit. They are in their mid- and late 70s, and very open-minded. However, every time the husband talks about me to clients or introduces me to them he refers to me as their secretary. I am a 37-year-old college-educated woman. Before this job I was a manager at a large, prestigious company. I was hired as the marketing department here but have ended up taking on work including bookkeeping and taxes -- duties far beyond my job description.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2009
Dear Amy: Recently on Facebook I posted a nice note on the "walls" of my family members. It was a note that was sent to me from a friend -- indicating that I was an angel. Amy, I sent this to more than 30 family members! A few of them responded and said the posting was nice, but the rest asked if I was doing OK. To me, it seems like they're asking if I'm mentally unstable and I find that to be very harsh and mean. It's very upsetting. Please shed some light on this.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2010
Dear Amy: I am a 14-year-old boy who is starting high school next year. I am slightly small and a little chubby, yet I am talented and smart with sports, and I believe I may have a future in them, yet because of my size nobody believes me. People also make fun of me for various reasons. I am the kid some people just like to pick on. Is it morally wrong to be motivated to be successful just to prove people wrong and be able to laugh in their faces later on? Student in Illinois Dear Student: If it were morally wrong to motivate yourself toward success just to prove that people's opinion of you in middle school was incorrect, then a lot of successful people would have to apologize for their success (myself included)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2010
Dear Amy: I have a close friend who lives in another state. My friend is married to a minister, "Bret," who is friends with another minister in another church. (I will call the second minister "Steve.") Steve is about 60 years old and unmarried. For at least 10 years he has hosted teenage boys in his home, sometimes as foster children and sometimes as exchange students. With many of these boys, Steve has engaged in sexually inappropriate behavior, which my friend has described to me. One of these children suffered a breakdown, and his parents had to fly over from Europe to retrieve him. Now Steve is hosting a 16-year-old exchange student with whom he is having a sexual relationship.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2010
Dear Amy: I am 5 foot 3 inches and weigh 112 pounds. I recently took a flight where the man sitting next to me weighed at least 250 pounds. There was an armrest between us that I had put down when I sat down, and when he came and sat in his seat next to mine, he put it back up. This left me very uncomfortable, as I had to lean away from him the whole flight because he had taken up my unused space in my seat. I paid for my seat and don't feel that I should be uncomfortable to make someone else more comfortable.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010
Dear Amy: I work for a partner at a very distinguished company. He has been conducting an affair with a "client" for more than three years now. He has been married for well over 20 years. He, however, is utilizing company funds to wine and dine his mistress and is asking me to submit these expenses for reimbursement. My conundrum is that if I report him I will lose my job; he is very connected. If I don't, then I feel I am cheating the company. I have asked to be transferred, but no other positions are available.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2010
Dear Amy: I'm about to be engaged to a wonderful woman. I have known her for three years. I have been wondering whether I should tell her that I had lap band surgery for my obesity seven years ago when I was 45. The surgery enabled me to lose 100 pounds. I had a subsequent tummy tuck that I lied to my lady about (to explain the scar). I have never told anyone else, including my family, about this. My lady is 5 foot 10 and a good weight, but it took her some time to get used to my eating habits -- which include eating less than she does.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2009
Dear Amy: I have been living with my paramour for almost three years. We are both in our 50s. He is still married, despite a lengthy legal separation. He often says it is "time to do something" about that, but that is as far as it goes. I want more than just a roommate, plus, if something happens to him, I'm stuck financially. I love him dearly, and he says he loves me too. But I find myself wondering -- am I all alone in this relationship? How do I broach this without sounding needy and greedy?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010
Dear Amy: In this age of Republican vs. Democrat in almost all phases of government, the stress of relatives being of the other party and attending tea parties, disrupting town halls and marching on Washington has strained family relationships. I know we are all different and have the freedom to choose, but I feel as if these are personal attacks on me, so I have deleted all conservative friends from my Facebook account. There are a lot of people with these feelings in both parties -- any suggestions on how to deal with it?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|