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April 4, 1986 | DOROTHY TOWNSEND, Times Staff Writer
Beach Boys drummer Dennis Wilson was a good swimmer, the only surfer in the band, and drugs had nothing to do with his drowning death, an attorney for Wilson's widow and child told Los Angeles Superior Court jurors Thursday. The panel will decide if an insurance policy on the musician's life was valid. Shawn Love Wilson, 21, sued Transamerica Occidental Life Insurance Co.
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NATIONAL
October 10, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Donald Eugene Miller Jr. has a leg up on Halloween. He can go trick-or-treating as a dead man and he doesn't even need a special costume. Miller, who was declared dead in 1994 by the Hancock County Probate Court in Ohio, made an unsuccessful bid this week to reverse the effects of legal decomposition. The court can't change a death ruling after three years, said County Probate Court Judge Allan Davis, according to the Courier of Findlay, Ohio. “We've got the obvious here.
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NATIONAL
March 19, 2012 | By David G. Savage
The Supreme Court justices voiced doubt over whether children who are born of in vitro fertilization more than a year after the death of their father are entitled to his survivor's benefits under the Social Security Act. The dispute involves a clash over how to interpret the 1930s pension law in an era of sperm donors and modern fertility. In 1939, Congress added a provision to the Social Security Act to give benefits to the survivors of deceased wage earners, including children who were dependents.  But judges have been split in the past decade over who qualifies as a survivor under this law. At issue is whether mothers can claim benefits for children who were conceived after their father died.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Christi Parsons and Lisa Mascaro, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - The Senate sent to the White House legislation that would restart death benefits for families of military members who die on active duty, and the president signed the bill Thursday night even though his spokesman had said it was not needed. “There's an obvious, available fix” for dealing with the government services that have fallen victim to the lapse in spending authority, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said. “Open the government.” [Updated, 5:40 p.m. Oct. 10:  Hours later, Obama signed the bill, even though a private charity had agreed to pay death benefits to the families, taking pressure off the White House to act. ]
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Christi Parsons and Lisa Mascaro, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - The Senate sent to the White House legislation that would restart death benefits for families of military members who die on active duty, and the president signed the bill Thursday night even though his spokesman had said it was not needed. “There's an obvious, available fix” for dealing with the government services that have fallen victim to the lapse in spending authority, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said. “Open the government.” [Updated, 5:40 p.m. Oct. 10:  Hours later, Obama signed the bill, even though a private charity had agreed to pay death benefits to the families, taking pressure off the White House to act. ]
NEWS
February 16, 1991
Some of the compensation and benefits available to dependents of U.S. military personnel who die in the line of duty. The list is not all-inclusive: DEATH GRATUITY: $3,000 payment immediately upon death of a member on active duty. HOUSING: 90 days of cash for quarters allowance, if eligible, or rent-free occupancy of military housing, if occupying such housing. INSURANCE: Payment of $50,000 from servicemen's group life insurance, if member opted for maximum coverage.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Life insurance giant MetLife Inc. will shell out nearly $500 million to settle a multi-state probe into its alleged failure to pay death benefits to beneficiaries. The company said it will pay out about $438 million over the next 17 years, with $188 million going out to beneficiaries this year. Insurance regulators from dozens of states have accused the company of delaying or withholding life insurance payments to many of its policyholders. About $40 million of that will likely end up in California, said State Controller John Chiang . The funds will either be sent on to beneficiaries of deceased MetLife policyholders or stored in state coffers as unclaimed property.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Christi Parsons and Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - President Obama is ordering his administration to restart payment of death benefits to the families of fallen military personnel despite the government shutdown, the White House said Wednesday. Obama was “not pleased” to learn that death benefits were not being paid and that grieving families were waiting for their stipends to cover the cost of burials, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said. “The president expects this to be fixed today,” Carney told reporters in the daily White House briefing.
NEWS
April 5, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
The families of U.S. soldiers killed in action or in accidents during the Iraq war are eligible for death benefits that could range from $250,000 to more than $800,000. The benefits are generally extended to the people who would have relied on the service member's income for economic security, and some can endure for the lifetime of the survivor. Dependent children are eligible for additional compensation, although many of those benefits are terminated if a surviving spouse remarries.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California officials, setting their sights on life insurance companies, want to know whether executives are boosting profits by delaying or failing to pay death benefits quickly enough to heirs or to search aggressively for the beneficiaries. Unpaid life insurance benefits nationwide exceed $1 billion, according to the National Assn. of Insurance Commissioners. It's not known how much of that involves California policies. "I am concerned that the insurance industry is not holding up its end of the sacred bargain it stuck with its clients when it issued life insurance policies in the first place," state Controller John Chiang said at a hearing Monday.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Christi Parsons and Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - President Obama is ordering his administration to restart payment of death benefits to the families of fallen military personnel despite the government shutdown, the White House said Wednesday. Obama was “not pleased” to learn that death benefits were not being paid and that grieving families were waiting for their stipends to cover the cost of burials, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said. “The president expects this to be fixed today,” Carney told reporters in the daily White House briefing.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon and Congress scrambled Wednesday to restore full military death benefits for families to quell a growing controversy as the federal government shutdown delayed assistance even to families of those who have given their lives for their country. In a surprise move, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced that the Pentagon had reached an agreement with Fisher House, a nonprofit charity that assists military families, to begin paying the survivor benefits, including a $100,000 death gratuity to next of kin, until the government can resume the payments.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga and David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - Not long after the flag-draped coffins of four Americans killed in combat arrived Wednesday at Delaware's Dover Air Force Base, the Pentagon announced that a private charity would restore death benefits for the families of military members who died while on active duty. But that quick action did little to calm the families' ire and stop the finger-pointing between the Obama administration and Republicans about a government failure whose effect was deeply symbolic and immediately felt by bereft parents, grieving spouses and children left without mothers and fathers.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2013 | By Evan Halper and Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon would furlough 400,000 civilian workers and temporarily stop paying death benefits to military families. The National Park Service would close all 401 national parks and give overnight campers two days to leave. Calls to the IRS would go unanswered. Those are among the effects that the public probably will notice first if federal agencies start shutting down Tuesday because Congress has failed to pass a bill to provide money for the new fiscal year. Agencies began disclosing their contingency plans Friday, and the announcements immediately became part of the partisan back-and-forth over whether the government will shut down and who is to blame.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
Desert rats and music lovers alike should find this unusually tuneful gathering to their liking. On June 21 and 22 concert organist Ty Woodward will perform four concerts on the historic theater pipe organ at Scotty's Castle in Death Valley National Park .  The Welte-Mignon theater pipe organ was purchased to accompany silent films.  In 1928, its owners spent an estimated $50,000 (almost $680,000 in today's dollars) to buy the organ and have it delivered and installed -- just in time for the advent of talking films.
SCIENCE
September 11, 2012 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
Is there something fishy going on with omega-3 fatty acids? For years, major health and medical organizations have recommended fish oil supplements rich in omega-3s to reduce the threat of heart disease. In Europe, where support is particularly enthusiastic, a doctor's failure to recommend the supplements is viewed by some as bordering on malpractice. But several recent studies have raised questions about the benefits of fish oil, sparking no small amount of confusion. A report published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga and David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - Not long after the flag-draped coffins of four Americans killed in combat arrived Wednesday at Delaware's Dover Air Force Base, the Pentagon announced that a private charity would restore death benefits for the families of military members who died while on active duty. But that quick action did little to calm the families' ire and stop the finger-pointing between the Obama administration and Republicans about a government failure whose effect was deeply symbolic and immediately felt by bereft parents, grieving spouses and children left without mothers and fathers.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2011 | By T. Christian Miller
An administrative law judge has referred a U.S. insurance company for criminal investigation after the firm failed to pay benefits to survivors of nine Iraqi translators killed while working for the American government. Under a federally funded program, Chicago-based CNA Financial Corp. provides insurance coverage to contractors killed or injured while working overseas for the U.S. The slain translators were helping to train Iraqi police recruits. CNA withheld information from the federal government and avoided making payments to the families who lost relatives in a 2006 attack, according to court files and interviews.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Have you been wanting to take Google+ to work? Now's your chance. The search giant said Wednesday that it is folding features from Google+ into Google Apps, including Hangouts, the video chat service which can connect up to 10 peeps and can now be turned into a virtual meeting, albeit a small one. Google Apps is the software that Google hawks to companies and competes with Microsoft. Google is a bit of a laggard in social networking, which has already made a grand - - and potentially lucrative -- entrance into the business world.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Life insurance giant MetLife Inc. will shell out roughly $500 million in a multistate settlement of its alleged failure to pay death benefits to heirs, regulators said. MetLife, however, said it will pay out about $438 million over the next 17 years, with $188 million going to beneficiaries this year. Insurance regulators from dozens of states had accused the company and others of delaying or withholding life insurance payments to many of its policyholders. About $40 million of the total is likely to end up in California, said State Controller John Chiang, who waged a multiyear audit of life insurance companies' operations.
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