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Death Of Osama Bin

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OPINION
May 5, 2011 | Doyle McManus
Al Qaeda is having a very bad year. And from the terrorists' standpoint, the death of Osama bin Laden isn't even the worst of it. The biggest potential blow is the spread of democratic politics in the Arab world. If it succeeds, Al Qaeda will be deprived of its reason for being. Bin Laden's death at the hands of American commandos produced strikingly little outrage in the Muslim world. In 2001, when he held the United States and Europe in a state of terror, Bin Laden was a hero to a sizable fringe of Muslims frustrated by their countries' stagnant politics.
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NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Michele Bachmann is no longer a candidate for president. And she sounds a bit relieved to be done with the national campaign. "I thought you would be interested in knowing that running for president of the United States is really one series of humiliations after another," she told conservative activists at the annual CPAC gathering here. But it was an educational experience, she joked, and shared some of the lessons that she learned while campaigning in the early primary states and navigating the national media gauntlet.
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NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Sen. Scott Brown, the Republican who captured a traditionally Democratic seat in Massachusetts and who faces a tough reelection next year, has asked to do his National Guard training this year in Afghanistan. Brown captured the seat held by the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy in a closely watched race that featured a battle over healthcare overhaul. He is up for reelection in 2012. “As a lieutenant colonel in the Massachusetts Army National Guard, I have service obligations that I fulfill each year,” Brown said in a prepared statement.
WORLD
August 28, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Al Qaeda's second-in-command has been killed in Pakistan, U.S. officials reported Saturday, in what was described as a major blow to an organization still reeling from the death of Osama bin Laden nearly four months ago. Atiyah Abdul Rahman was killed Monday in the Pakistani tribal region of Waziristan, a U.S. official said. A suspected U.S. drone strike was reported that day, but the official would not say how Rahman died. "Atiyah was at the top of Al Qaeda's trusted core," said the official, who would not be identified discussing sensitive intelligence matters.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Michele Bachmann is no longer a candidate for president. And she sounds a bit relieved to be done with the national campaign. "I thought you would be interested in knowing that running for president of the United States is really one series of humiliations after another," she told conservative activists at the annual CPAC gathering here. But it was an educational experience, she joked, and shared some of the lessons that she learned while campaigning in the early primary states and navigating the national media gauntlet.
NATIONAL
May 5, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Lisa Mascaro and Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
As President Obama enjoys a quick boost in his poll ratings following the death of Osama bin Laden, he and his aides are wrestling with how best to employ that newly acquired political heft and avoid the contrasting pitfalls of two predecessors, both named Bush. In 2004, George W. Bush boasted after his reelection that he had new political capital and set about trying to revamp Social Security, an initiative that fell flat and cost his party dearly in the next election. His father, George H.W. Bush, soared to 90% approval in polls after the victory in the Persian Gulf War, then did little with his advantage and watched it fade until he lost his reelection bid. Obama's aides, mindful of both examples, want to avoid overreaching or seeming to exploit Bin Laden's death for political purposes.
WORLD
August 28, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Al Qaeda's second-in-command has been killed in Pakistan, U.S. officials reported Saturday, in what was described as a major blow to an organization still reeling from the death of Osama bin Laden nearly four months ago. Atiyah Abdul Rahman was killed Monday in the Pakistani tribal region of Waziristan, a U.S. official said. A suspected U.S. drone strike was reported that day, but the official would not say how Rahman died. "Atiyah was at the top of Al Qaeda's trusted core," said the official, who would not be identified discussing sensitive intelligence matters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | By Phil Willon and Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Del Warren of Long Beach got the news in a text message and immediately began to tear up. Osama bin Laden was dead, said the text from the widow of Warren's son Kyle, who was killed by a roadside bomb in southern Afghanistan. "It's fabulous," Warren said Sunday night, glued to the television set. Photos: Osama bin Laden dead President Obama's announcement that U.S. forces had killed the 9/11 mastermind in Pakistan brought a sense of closure for soldiers as well as families who lost soldiers in the war in Afghanistan.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
News that Osama bin Laden has been killed brought messages of congratulations from some of the United States' closest allies. British Prime Minister David Cameron said Bin Laden's death would "bring great relief to people across the world. " Photo gallery: Reactions to Osama bin Laden death "Osama bin Laden was responsible for the worst terrorist atrocities the world has seen -- for 9/11 and for so many attacks, which have cost thousands of lives, many of them British," Cameron said in a statement.
NEWS
May 1, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Sarah Palin said Sunday the nation is "united in celebration and gratitude" following the death of Osama bin Laden. "God bless all the brave men and women in our military and our intelligence services who contributed to carrying out the successful mission to bring bin Laden to justice and who laid the groundwork over the years to make this victory possible," the former Alaska governor wrote in a post to her Facebook page. "It’s a testament to the hard work and dedication of these brave Americans who relentlessly hunted down our enemy.
WORLD
May 7, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Insurgent gunmen and suicide bombers launched fierce simultaneous attacks Saturday against half a dozen government buildings in the troubled southern city of Kandahar, hours after the Taliban vowed to fight on in the wake of Osama bin Laden's death. At least eight people were killed, including six of the attackers, and dozens of others were injured in the daylong assault, provincial officials said. Gunfire and large explosions rattled through the city center for hours, witnesses said, as fighting raged outside the heavily fortified governor's compound, the mayor's office, the directorate of the main intelligence agency and several police installations.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2011 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
In a poignant visit to the site that has come to symbolize both the trauma and triumphs arising from the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, President Obama placed a wreath at the fallen World Trade Center on Thursday and said the killing of Osama bin Laden upheld America's vow to "never forget" victims' suffering. As a gusty wind blew flower petals onto the ground, Obama set the wreath of red, white and blue flowers on a simple wooden stand and then stood silently for a minute, head bowed, eyes closed, hands clasped in front of him. A cluster of invited guests, most of them relatives of those killed on Sept.
OPINION
May 5, 2011 | Doyle McManus
Al Qaeda is having a very bad year. And from the terrorists' standpoint, the death of Osama bin Laden isn't even the worst of it. The biggest potential blow is the spread of democratic politics in the Arab world. If it succeeds, Al Qaeda will be deprived of its reason for being. Bin Laden's death at the hands of American commandos produced strikingly little outrage in the Muslim world. In 2001, when he held the United States and Europe in a state of terror, Bin Laden was a hero to a sizable fringe of Muslims frustrated by their countries' stagnant politics.
NATIONAL
May 5, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Lisa Mascaro and Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
As President Obama enjoys a quick boost in his poll ratings following the death of Osama bin Laden, he and his aides are wrestling with how best to employ that newly acquired political heft and avoid the contrasting pitfalls of two predecessors, both named Bush. In 2004, George W. Bush boasted after his reelection that he had new political capital and set about trying to revamp Social Security, an initiative that fell flat and cost his party dearly in the next election. His father, George H.W. Bush, soared to 90% approval in polls after the victory in the Persian Gulf War, then did little with his advantage and watched it fade until he lost his reelection bid. Obama's aides, mindful of both examples, want to avoid overreaching or seeming to exploit Bin Laden's death for political purposes.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano and Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
An hour after President Obama announced that Osama bin Laden was dead, a midnight bulletin flashed across the country to state and local law enforcement officials, warning them that a suddenly leaderless Al Qaeda would probably "retaliate" and "continue to pursue attacks" against the United States. The caution from the Homeland Security Department in Washington escalated Monday as national security officials, terrorism experts and the White House agreed that future strikes could likely be triggered from a new power struggle inside Al Qaeda or by some lone wolf or "micro-terrorist" plotting in the U.S. to personally even the score for Bin Laden's death.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Sen. Scott Brown, the Republican who captured a traditionally Democratic seat in Massachusetts and who faces a tough reelection next year, has asked to do his National Guard training this year in Afghanistan. Brown captured the seat held by the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy in a closely watched race that featured a battle over healthcare overhaul. He is up for reelection in 2012. “As a lieutenant colonel in the Massachusetts Army National Guard, I have service obligations that I fulfill each year,” Brown said in a prepared statement.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano and Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
An hour after President Obama announced that Osama bin Laden was dead, a midnight bulletin flashed across the country to state and local law enforcement officials, warning them that a suddenly leaderless Al Qaeda would probably "retaliate" and "continue to pursue attacks" against the United States. The caution from the Homeland Security Department in Washington escalated Monday as national security officials, terrorism experts and the White House agreed that future strikes could likely be triggered from a new power struggle inside Al Qaeda or by some lone wolf or "micro-terrorist" plotting in the U.S. to personally even the score for Bin Laden's death.
WORLD
May 7, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Insurgent gunmen and suicide bombers launched fierce simultaneous attacks Saturday against half a dozen government buildings in the troubled southern city of Kandahar, hours after the Taliban vowed to fight on in the wake of Osama bin Laden's death. At least eight people were killed, including six of the attackers, and dozens of others were injured in the daylong assault, provincial officials said. Gunfire and large explosions rattled through the city center for hours, witnesses said, as fighting raged outside the heavily fortified governor's compound, the mayor's office, the directorate of the main intelligence agency and several police installations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | By Phil Willon and Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Del Warren of Long Beach got the news in a text message and immediately began to tear up. Osama bin Laden was dead, said the text from the widow of Warren's son Kyle, who was killed by a roadside bomb in southern Afghanistan. "It's fabulous," Warren said Sunday night, glued to the television set. Photos: Osama bin Laden dead President Obama's announcement that U.S. forces had killed the 9/11 mastermind in Pakistan brought a sense of closure for soldiers as well as families who lost soldiers in the war in Afghanistan.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
News that Osama bin Laden has been killed brought messages of congratulations from some of the United States' closest allies. British Prime Minister David Cameron said Bin Laden's death would "bring great relief to people across the world. " Photo gallery: Reactions to Osama bin Laden death "Osama bin Laden was responsible for the worst terrorist atrocities the world has seen -- for 9/11 and for so many attacks, which have cost thousands of lives, many of them British," Cameron said in a statement.
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