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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A 53-year-old man convicted of killing two Riverside County Sheriff's Department deputies in 1997 has died after possibly committing suicide, corrections authorities said Monday afternoon. Timothy Russell was convicted in the ambush slayings of James Lehmann Jr., 41, an Apple Valley resident, and Michael Haugen 33, who lived in San Jacinto.  The deputies had responded to an early morning domestic-violence call outside a remote desert-area mobile home where Russell lived.  Authorities said Russell was hiding behind scrub brush and opened fire with a World War II-vintage military carbine as the deputies got out of their patrol cars in pre-dawn darkness on Jan. 5. They died at the scene.
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BUSINESS
August 1, 2003 | Chuck Philips, Times Staff Writer
Someone is gunning for Marion "Suge" Knight. The head of Death Row Records grew famous glamorizing gang violence. He called his artists "inmates." His company logo depicted a hooded convict strapped into an electric chair. His producers grafted violent lyrics onto driving rhythms, punctuated by shotgun blasts and wailing sirens. That was make-believe mayhem. Now, Knight is being stalked by the real thing.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
A bitterly divided Supreme Court on Tuesday tossed out a jury verdict won by a New Orleans man who spent 14 years on death row and came within weeks of execution because prosecutors had hidden a blood test and other evidence that would have proven his innocence. The 5-4 decision delivered by Justice Clarence Thomas shielded the New Orleans district attorney's office from being held liable for the mistakes of its prosecutors. The evidence of their misconduct did not prove "deliberate indifference" on the part of then-Dist.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
A Louisiana man was released from death row on Friday after serving 15 years for a crime that DNA evidence shows he did not commit. Damon Thibodeaux, 38, was the 300 th prisoner nationwide to see his conviction overturned based on DNA evidence, according to lawyers who represented him from the New York-based Innocence Project. He was the 18 th death row prisoner freed based on such evidence. “This journey to freedom was a long time coming,” said one of his attorneys, Caroline Tillman of the Capital Post-Conviction Project of Louisiana, in a statement Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Serial wife-killer Jerry Stanley wants to die. Imprisoned on death row for the past 28 years, Stanley insists he deserves execution for the cold-blooded killing of his fourth wife in 1980 and for shooting to death his second wife five years earlier in front of their two children. Despairing of the isolation and monotony of San Quentin's rooftop fortress for the purportedly doomed, Stanley earlier this year stepped up his campaign for a date with the executioner by offering to solve the cold case of his third wife's disappearance 31 years ago — by disclosing where he buried her body.
OPINION
December 31, 2010
The cages must go Re "Inmates caged for therapy," Dec. 28 If the vision of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation is "a safer California through correctional excellence," then citizens and legislators should demand that this therapeutic practice of caged group therapy for mentally ill inmates end. As a matter of public safety, we all ought to be very concerned that this inhumane practice occurs without a...
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Michael Muskal, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Glenn Ford, one of the nation's longest-serving prisoners on death row, is scheduled to be freed from a Louisiana prison after he was exonerated of charges that he killed a man in 1983, his lawyers announced. A Louisiana court on Monday ordered that Ford, an African American who served 30 years on death row, be released after new information exonerated the former yard worker of killing a white man. Ford was expected to be released Tuesday. [Updated, 5:53 p.m.:  Ford walked free Tuesday afternoon.
OPINION
November 15, 2009
Life on death row Re "When death penalty means a better life," Nov. 11 Isn't it nice that our death row inmates enjoy such luxurious accommodations compared to the rest of the prison populace? You talk about milking the system. The fact that Billy Joe Johnson requested the death penalty because he knows he won't be executed for at least 30 years, and is now able to enjoy a life of relative comfort at taxpayer expense, is yet another example of our bureaucratic stupidity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
After upholding nearly 50 death sentences in a row, the California Supreme Court on Monday broke its pattern by overturning the convictions of a reputed gang leader in Los Angeles and his alleged accomplice in two killings that sent both men to death row for 15 years. The state high court unanimously ruled that Cleamon Johnson and Michael Allen, convicted of killing rival gang members Peyton Beroit and Donald Loggins in 1991, were denied a fair trial when a judge removed a juror who appeared to be critical of the prosecution's case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Police and death row inmates agree on one thing, a law enforcement group told its members: They both oppose next week's ballot measure to replace the death penalty with life without parole. That statement, in a newsletter from the Los Angeles Police Protective League opposing Proposition 34, highlighted what some California criminal defense lawyers have been saying for months. Many death row inmates who are years away from execution would rather gamble on being executed than lose their state-paid lawyers, a preference that seems to be confirmed by a limited, informal survey of some on California's death row. VOTER GUIDE: 2012 California Propositions "That is a significant sentiment, since the death penalty in California is mostly life without parole anyway," said Don Specter, director of California's Prison Law Office, who personally supports the initiative.
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