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TRAVEL
February 13, 2011 | By Dan Blackburn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
THE BEST WAY TO DEATH VALLEY Death Valley is about 295 miles northeast of Los Angeles and 120 miles from Las Vegas. Good directions can be found at the Furnace Creek Resort website, http://www.furnacecreekresort.com/directions-533.html . LODGING There are three main places to stay in the park: the Furnace Creek Resort's Inn at Furnace Creek and Ranch at Furnace Creek, and Stovepipe Wells Village. All three have swimming pools, restaurants, gift shops, general stores and a range of activities.
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NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Drought? What drought? Southern California's sporadic rainfall (and lack of it) this season seems to have been just enough for wildflowers to put on a decent show at Death Valley National Park. The park , about 300 miles inland from Los Angeles, reports the late spring bloom should continue as temperatures rise. "Much to our surprise, wildflowers are turning out to having a pretty decent bloom this spring after all," says a note on the park's website and Facebook page . "Rainfall in the higher elevations--especially in the Panamint Mountains --are allowing a late spring bloom, and it may only get better and higher as the temperatures warm.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton and Louis Sahagun
Death Valley continued to broil Monday, a day after setting a major weather record. The high temperature was 126 degrees. As of 4 p.m., it was 123, according to Accuweather. Sunday's record-blistering high was reported as 129. The heat wave continued Monday with temperatures in the 80s in the L.A. basin, 90s in valley areas and above 100 in spots like Lancaster, Palmdale and Palm Springs. The forecast calls for slightly cooler temperatures Tuesday and Wednesday. For much of California, the focus has been on Death Valley.
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Eureka Dunes, a towering expanse of shifting slopes wedged between weathered mountains in the Mojave Desert, had a reputation as a campground, an off-road vehicle course and a home to a few plant species found no place else on Earth. In the late 1970s, the dunes earned a reputation as an area where the Eureka Valley evening primrose and Eureka dune grass were listed as federally endangered species to protect them from being driven to extinction by off-road vehicle recreation. On Wednesday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed that the plants be removed from the list because their populations have stabilized in a region that became part of Death Valley National Park in 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton and Louis Sahagun
The record heat in Death Valley turned the hot spot into a draw for the meteorologically curious - and brave. According to the National Weather Service , Sunday's highest temperature was 129 degrees, making it the hottest June temperature ever recorded in the U.S. The soaring temperature also beat out the park's hottest temperature from last summer by one degree, according to park officials. "It's early for us to have these temperatures in June," said park spokeswoman Cheryl Chipman.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Even after the weekend's Video Music Awards, MTV continues to celebrate its 30th birthday and to push for new relevance with two shows premiering Monday. "Ridiculousness," hosted by Rob Dyrdek, is a rip-off of "America's Funniest Home Videos" and skewed to a younger, hipper demographic. So instead of toddlers running headfirst into dishwashers (always hilarious), it's young men on skateboards and pogo sticks doing tricks that end badly, often with deleterious effects to their reproductive organs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2012 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
It took 99 years, but Death Valley finally got the record. The World Meteorological Organization announced last week that it now considers Death Valley National Park the hottest place on Earth. The highest recorded surface temperature of 134 degrees (56.7 degrees Celsius) was measured on July 10, 1913, at Greenland Ranch — now fittingly called Furnace Creek. That was apparently surpassed on Sept. 13, 1922, with a reading of 136.4 degrees (58 C) in what is now Libya. But that reading long has been disputed.
TRAVEL
February 13, 2011 | By Dan Blackburn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the summer, the sun in Death Valley shows no mercy, pushing the mercury over the 115-degree mark, sucking every drop of moisture from the earth and air. It is a cruel dictator. Winter then stages a coup. Daytime highs average in the 80s, nighttime lows in the 30s. Life returns to the 3-million-acre national park, and visitors will find a flourishing golf course, horseback rides, Jeep rentals, hiking, swimming pools and the historic and highly regarded 1930s-style Furnace Creek Inn. As an added prize, the 5,270 square miles of Death Valley serve up some amazing sunrises and sunsets in winter.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Death Valley National Park gained a new distinction Wednesday for its night sky and the care it has taken to protect and preserve the darkness. The International Dark-Sky Assn. selected Death Valley as an International Dark Sky Park for its exceptional skyscape, educational programs and steps it has taken to reduce the glow and glare of artificial lights inside the park. There are 11 parks worldwide that have received the dark-sky moniker. "Death Valley is a place to gaze in awe at the expanse of the Milky Way, follow a lunar eclipse, track a meteor shower, or simply reflect on your place in the universe," National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis said in a statement.
AUTOS
September 5, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
September is a big month for supercar maker McLaren: not only is the company celebrating its 50th anniversary, but deliveries of its 903-horsepower P1 hypercar also kick off soon.  To highlight this, and under the guise of “final durability testing,” McLaren brought a Carbon Black P1 right into our own backyard. On the track at Willow Springs Raceway in Rosamond, as well as throughout Death Valley, the British automaker “tested” the car with a full film crew tagging along.  PHOTOS: McLaren P1 heads to Death Valley for testing The result are 10 gorgeous photos of the plug-in hybrid car, as well as a video in which you can hear just what makes the P1 so fast.
OPINION
February 4, 2014
Re "Athletes run out of Death Valley," Feb. 2 I read with great sadness that the athletes are being run out of Death Valley at the same time the region is being filled with more and more tourists in motorized vehicles. How ironic that on the day millions of Americans overindulged while sitting in front of their TV screens watching the Super Bowl, the runners and cyclists out there training were told by The Times that they will not have access to one of the premier natural venues for outdoor athletic competition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By James Rainey
For 27 straight summers, all that stood between runners and completion of the Badwater Ultramarathon was 135 miles of asphalt, a 13,000-foot elevation gain and late July temperatures that soared to 120 degrees and above. They called it "the toughest foot race in the world. " And not too many people argued. But this summer, the race from the depths of Death Valley to the shoulders of Mt. Whitney has been moved, while the National Park Service conducts a "safety assessment" of the run and other athletic events.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The Badwater 135 Ultramarathon race will go on - just not in Death Valley National Park, where it was scheduled for July 21-23. The park this week announced it was suspending spring and summer endurance events pending a safety review, which affected the Badwater event. The park will, however, accept applications for such events scheduled for Oct. 1 and beyond. "This is not about Badwater," park spokeswoman Cheryl Chipman said about the annual race that had begun at Badwater, Calif., the lowest point in the U.S., to the base of Mt. Whitney.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Death Valley National Park suspended permits for the iconic Badwater 135 Ultramarathon and other running and bicycling endurance events in the park until officials can complete a safety review, a statement on the park's website said Monday. AdventureCorps organizes the annual Badwater 135m which had been scheduled for July 21-23. Runners start in Badwater, the lowest point in the United States, and survive 135 rugged desert miles to climb to the base of Mt. Whitney at more than 8,000 feet in elevation.
AUTOS
September 5, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
September is a big month for supercar maker McLaren: not only is the company celebrating its 50th anniversary, but deliveries of its 903-horsepower P1 hypercar also kick off soon.  To highlight this, and under the guise of “final durability testing,” McLaren brought a Carbon Black P1 right into our own backyard. On the track at Willow Springs Raceway in Rosamond, as well as throughout Death Valley, the British automaker “tested” the car with a full film crew tagging along.  PHOTOS: McLaren P1 heads to Death Valley for testing The result are 10 gorgeous photos of the plug-in hybrid car, as well as a video in which you can hear just what makes the P1 so fast.
NATIONAL
July 17, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
A vast swath of the United States is roasting under the latest heat wave of the summer. A scorching heat wave last month registered higher temperatures, but this one is hitting a larger area, with forecasters warning of potentially dangerous temperatures from the Dakotas to New England.  Weather advisories were issued for parts of at least 19 states. As temperatures soared into the 90s across the country, authorities were urging residents to seek out air conditioning, cooling shelters or community pools.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
It was 125 degrees in Death Valley National Park on Wednesday, and 126 on Tuesday. Of course, the searing temperatures did plummet to a low of 98 degrees at night. But the excessive heat and red-flag warnings won't stop a bunch of rarefied runners from competing in the 35th Badwater Ultramarathon beginning Monday at Badwater, the lowest point in Death Valley, about 17 miles south of Furnace Creek. Race director Chris Kostman says temperatures are supposed to cool down during the weekend but the race goes on -- rain or ultra-shine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2009 | Julie Cart
Barker Ranch, the old Death Valley mining camp notorious as Charles Manson's hide-out, has been gutted in a suspicious fire, according to the National Park Service. "The building is gutted, burned out," said Terry Baldino, a spokesman for Death Valley National Park. The homestead's rock walls and tin roof were still intact, but its hand-hewn wooden interior beams and window and door frames were all reduced to ash, he said.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Just because you didn't go to Death Valley National Park on Wednesday to celebrate the centennial of the World's Hottest Air Temperature doesn't mean you have to miss out on the cool anniversary merchandise. "Sometimes it's better to NOT GO, and just get the T-shirt online," Jon Klusmire, museum services director of the Eastern California Museum , wrote Wednesday in an email. I think he might be right, given that the top temperature in the park Wednesday was only 14 degrees lower than the record 134 degrees . T-shirts, lapel pins, patches and magnets mark the Big Heat day with the words "World's Hottest Death Valley 134° July 10, 2013 100th Anniversary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc
On a recent visit to Death Valley National Park, as tourists kept watchful eyes on dueling thermometers and temperatures soared near-record highs , Roxanne Melchiori and her family admired the breathtaking badlands. Then, she said, her 12-year-old daughter sniffed and made a face. It smelled like rotten eggs. They looked down at their feet and spotted the culprit: an egg cracked open and left sitting on a rock, ostensibly by someone who thought it might just be hot enough to fry one. It looked more “crystallized” than cooked, said Melchiori, an accountant from Rhode Island.
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