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Death Valley National Monument

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NEWS
October 8, 1985
Wild burros captured in the annual roundup at Death Valley National Monument cannot be sold for slaughter under terms of an agreement between federal lawyers and attorneys representing an animal rights group. The Fund for Animals had sought a temporary restraining order to halt the Oct. 15 roundup until the National Park Service agrees to protect the animals from slaughter. At the request of U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1998
Theater "Room Service," the classic comedy that was a Broadway hit in 1937 and a Marx Brothers film of 1938, closes at the Actors Alley at El Portal on Sunday. 5269 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood. Today-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. $16. (818) 508-4200. Jazz Trumpeter and film composer Terence Blanchard's five-day run with vocalist Jubilant Sykes and quintet closes at the Jazz Bakery, 3233 Helms Ave., Culver City, with 8:30 and 10 p.m. shows today-Saturday.
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NEWS
June 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two crew members aboard a California Air National Guard jet fighter were killed when the plane crashed and burned in the Mojave Desert near Death Valley. Maj. Robert M. McGann, the pilot, and Capt. Thomas M. Steed, the weapons system officer, died in the crash, said Maj. Bruce Roy, an Air National Guard spokesman. He said a new Pentagon policy prohibited the release of the ages or hometowns of the victims.
NEWS
October 14, 1997
The cornucopia that is this city must be seen to be believed. Fortunately, there's always something out there to see. TO EVERY SEASON . . . Before we learned about rules and boundaries and borders, the world was our playground. Nothing stopped us from making a castle out of a fallen tree, a serene lake out of a puddle, an Indy 500 car out of a neighbor's discarded cardboard box.
TRAVEL
July 31, 1994
Up to 1,000 single recreational vehicle aficionados are expected at the silver anniversary rally of Loners on Wheels, an organization of 2,700 widowed, divorced or never-married RVers. The 25th birthday bash is set for Nov. 2-6 at Death Valley National Monument. Activities will include tours, hikes, dances and tournaments. Participants will stay at Sunset Campground ($6 a night). Registration is $10 before Oct. 1; $15 thereafter.
NEWS
June 30, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
The National Park Service's program to remove alive "every last wild burro" from 2-million-acre Death Valley National Monument has been essentially completed with the capture of more than 6,000 burros. Today is the deadline set four years ago for capturing the animals and putting them up for adoption. To make sure wild burros do not return to Death Valley, Park Service rangers beginning Wednesday are authorized to kill any stragglers they encounter while on patrol.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1998
Theater "Room Service," the classic comedy that was a Broadway hit in 1937 and a Marx Brothers film of 1938, closes at the Actors Alley at El Portal on Sunday. 5269 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood. Today-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. $16. (818) 508-4200. Jazz Trumpeter and film composer Terence Blanchard's five-day run with vocalist Jubilant Sykes and quintet closes at the Jazz Bakery, 3233 Helms Ave., Culver City, with 8:30 and 10 p.m. shows today-Saturday.
NEWS
November 6, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Visitors to Death Valley National Monument have been warned to stay away from wild animals because of the danger of rabies. State Health Director Kenneth Kizer said visitors to the monument after Oct. 9 may have been infected with rabies if they came in contact with infected foxes, coyotes, bats and other meat-eating wild or domestic animals. "One person has been bitten by a rabid fox at Stovepipe Wells," Kizer said.
NEWS
January 25, 1987
"A Couple Disappear in Bermuda Triangle of Death Valley" by Ann Japenga on Dec. 21 is an unjust slam at Death Valley--at least to us Death Valley lovers! As the article states, these disappearances took place in the Saline Valley, some 40 miles from Lone Pine, which is in the Owens Valley. The Saline Valley is some 160 miles from Scotty's Castle in the Death Valley National Monument, or, if one has a four-wheel-drive, high-clearance vehicle, a shorter distance, which still takes about three hours.
NEWS
October 14, 1997
The cornucopia that is this city must be seen to be believed. Fortunately, there's always something out there to see. TO EVERY SEASON . . . Before we learned about rules and boundaries and borders, the world was our playground. Nothing stopped us from making a castle out of a fallen tree, a serene lake out of a puddle, an Indy 500 car out of a neighbor's discarded cardboard box.
TRAVEL
May 21, 1995 | JOHN McKINNEY
Most Death Valley visitors are content to stop their cars at Badwater, 282 feet below sea level, and look up at Telescope Peak, the greatest vertical rise in the contiguous United States. For the serious hiker, however, the challenge of climbing 11,049-foot Telescope Peak and looking down at Death Valley will prove irresistible. The views from Telescope Peak Trail include Badwater, the lowest point in the country, and Mt. Whitney, the continental high point.
TRAVEL
July 31, 1994
Up to 1,000 single recreational vehicle aficionados are expected at the silver anniversary rally of Loners on Wheels, an organization of 2,700 widowed, divorced or never-married RVers. The 25th birthday bash is set for Nov. 2-6 at Death Valley National Monument. Activities will include tours, hikes, dances and tournaments. Participants will stay at Sunset Campground ($6 a night). Registration is $10 before Oct. 1; $15 thereafter.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shirley Harding stood outside the remains of the old Harmony Borax Works holding a decorated teapot dug up from the nearby 1880s Chinese labor camp. It is one of 100,000 museum objects now carefully catalogued in a computer at the monument office, said Harding, the curator.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Ohio man died of exposure while trying to cross a section of Death Valley National Park, a park spokesman said. Patrick David Hodges' body was discovered less than a mile from his car. It was Hodges' third try at hiking the difficult section known as the "saltpan," Ranger Mike Rondas said. On his most recent attempt, Hodges, 40, failed to complete the 20-mile hike after he ran out of water and suffered exposure.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | MICHAEL T. HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just how hot can it get in this blistering East Mojave Desert community? Perhaps by late summer, a 134-foot-high thermometer will be able to tell you. San Bernardino County planning commissioners Thursday approved construction of what is likely to be the world's tallest temperature gauge just off Interstate 15 on the road to Las Vegas. Expected to cost $600,000, the thermometer is the brainchild of longtime Baker businessman Willis Herron.
TRAVEL
February 17, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We are careening up a dirt road high in the scrub brush of the Panamint Range, trying to make Skidoo before sundown. Even in our heavy, middle-aged Cadillac, carriage of the desert, the washboards are rough. It's hard to find the right speed for the least vibration. The car is shaking apart, side mirrors rattling crazily, nuts backing off screws. Unnoticed in the commotion, the front license plate falls away and disappears in billows of dust.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | MICHAEL T. HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just how hot can it get in this blistering East Mojave Desert community? Perhaps by late summer, a 134-foot-high thermometer will be able to tell you. San Bernardino County planning commissioners Thursday approved construction of what is likely to be the world's tallest temperature gauge just off Interstate 15 on the road to Las Vegas. Expected to cost $600,000, the thermometer is the brainchild of longtime Baker businessman Willis Herron.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1988
Old men usually subscribe to old adages. When it comes to Senate Bill 7, the proposed California Desert Protection Act, the phrase "if it ain't broke--don't fix it" is particularly fitting as far as we're concerned. For many reasons we oppose Sen. Alan Cranston's (D-Calif.) bill. The issue of the California desert is one on which we have been actively working for a long time. Over a period of years, the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management have been considering boundary adjustments to the current California Desert Conservation Area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial bill to preserve 8 million acres of California desert, much of it in San Bernardino County, stalled in committee Wednesday. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), the bill's sponsor, accused Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) of masterminding a procedural tactic that prevented the Energy and Natural Resources Committee from voting on the bill. Wilson, who was in California campaigning for governor, denied Cranston's charge that he called on Sen. James McClure (R-Ida.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dave Flegel has what might just be the hottest job in America. Officially, he is a California highway patrolman responsible for 5,000 square miles of desert here; but to many, he is Death Valley's good Samaritan. He said it is the positive side of his job that he enjoys most: "Patrolling the busy freeways means mostly writing tickets for traffic violators. Everyone's mad at you. Here, I spend most of my time making people feel good."
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