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Death Valley National Monument

NEWS
September 7, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dave Flegel has what might just be the hottest job in America. Officially, he is a California highway patrolman responsible for 5,000 square miles of desert here; but to many, he is Death Valley's good Samaritan. He said it is the positive side of his job that he enjoys most: "Patrolling the busy freeways means mostly writing tickets for traffic violators. Everyone's mad at you. Here, I spend most of my time making people feel good."
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NEWS
July 14, 1988 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
A Marine Corps major who lost a lung when he was wounded in Vietnam began a nonstop 146-mile run Wednesday that will take him from the blistering desert floor 282 feet below sea level here to the 14,464-foot peak of Mt. Whitney. Maj. John Bates is not the first person to attempt the grueling run, which will begin at the lowest spot in North America and end at the highest point in the contiguous United States. But he may be the brassiest of the dozen or so people who have done it.
TRAVEL
February 17, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We are careening up a dirt road high in the scrub brush of the Panamint Range, trying to make Skidoo before sundown. Even in our heavy, middle-aged Cadillac, carriage of the desert, the washboards are rough. It's hard to find the right speed for the least vibration. The car is shaking apart, side mirrors rattling crazily, nuts backing off screws. Unnoticed in the commotion, the front license plate falls away and disappears in billows of dust.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | ANN JAPENGA, Times Staff Writer
Disappear here. --Caption of a painting of Death Valley at the Furnace Creek Inn The joy of success for Beverly Hills real estate developer and liquor importer Jules Berman was in providing for his only child. When he was 7, Barry Berman asked to go to Hawaii, so his father took him there. There would be more trips as Barry got older--to Africa and India. Last year at Christmas, Jules Berman and his wife, Ruth, gave their son, then 35, a dinghy for his sailboat.
SPORTS
July 5, 1990 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
With ice cubes in their hats, pajamas on their legs, and yards of electrical tape wrapped around their feet, John Rosmus and David Warady will take off today for a run across one of the nation's hottest hot spots: Death Valley National Monument. Yes, Death Valley. California's furnace-hot, vacation spot. A one-time world temperature record of 134 degrees was recorded there. Last Sunday, it was 125.
NEWS
September 4, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
A blistering midday sun shimmered eerily in all directions across the vast emptiness here at one of the hottest places on Earth. Despite the 120-degree heat, people poured from rented cars and chartered buses at Badwater--282 feet below sea level, the lowest place in the Western Hemisphere. Steady streams of men and women walked up and down the short steep trail from the parking lot to Zabriskie Point for a dramatic overview of Death Valley's spectacular mountains and weird desert formations.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Ohio man died of exposure while trying to cross a section of Death Valley National Park, a park spokesman said. Patrick David Hodges' body was discovered less than a mile from his car. It was Hodges' third try at hiking the difficult section known as the "saltpan," Ranger Mike Rondas said. On his most recent attempt, Hodges, 40, failed to complete the 20-mile hike after he ran out of water and suffered exposure.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A boisterous crowd of nearly 2,000 gathered here Saturday for a congressional hearing on legislation designed to protect the California desert by creating three national parks. Waving signs and chanting cheers in a way reminiscent of a high school pep rally, opponents on both sides of the mushrooming desert preservation battle staged raucous demonstrations before crowding into a hall to testify before a congressional committee.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 2,000 people flocked to a congressional hearing in Beverly Hills Saturday where they shouted, booed and whistled their support or opposition to a controversial proposal that would drastically alter the use of 4.5 million acres of the California desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial bill to preserve 8 million acres of California desert, much of it in San Bernardino County, stalled in committee Wednesday. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), the bill's sponsor, accused Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) of masterminding a procedural tactic that prevented the Energy and Natural Resources Committee from voting on the bill. Wilson, who was in California campaigning for governor, denied Cranston's charge that he called on Sen. James McClure (R-Ida.
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