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Death Valley National Park

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SCIENCE
May 30, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Death Valley National Park officials are investigating the theft of several of the rocks that mysteriously roam across a remote ancient lake bed known as the Racetrack Playa. Rocks of various sizes -- from baseball to basketball -- scoot across the 2.5-mile-long, oval-shaped mudflat on the north end of the park, leaving tracks that are straight, curved and even looped. Some tracks extend up to 600 feet. Geologists theorize that the rocks slide after rain moistens the top few centimeters of the lake bed and a high wind pushes them around.
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NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Drought? What drought? Southern California's sporadic rainfall (and lack of it) this season seems to have been just enough for wildflowers to put on a decent show at Death Valley National Park. The park , about 300 miles inland from Los Angeles, reports the late spring bloom should continue as temperatures rise. "Much to our surprise, wildflowers are turning out to having a pretty decent bloom this spring after all," says a note on the park's website and Facebook page . "Rainfall in the higher elevations--especially in the Panamint Mountains --are allowing a late spring bloom, and it may only get better and higher as the temperatures warm.
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NEWS
December 24, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Death Valley National Park suspended permits for the iconic Badwater 135 Ultramarathon and other running and bicycling endurance events in the park until officials can complete a safety review, a statement on the park's website said Monday. AdventureCorps organizes the annual Badwater 135m which had been scheduled for July 21-23. Runners start in Badwater, the lowest point in the United States, and survive 135 rugged desert miles to climb to the base of Mt. Whitney at more than 8,000 feet in elevation.
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Eureka Dunes, a towering expanse of shifting slopes wedged between weathered mountains in the Mojave Desert, had a reputation as a campground, an off-road vehicle course and a home to a few plant species found no place else on Earth. In the late 1970s, the dunes earned a reputation as an area where the Eureka Valley evening primrose and Eureka dune grass were listed as federally endangered species to protect them from being driven to extinction by off-road vehicle recreation. On Wednesday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed that the plants be removed from the list because their populations have stabilized in a region that became part of Death Valley National Park in 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2008 | Louis Sahagun
As a career ranger for more than 30 years, James T. Reynolds has had assignments that included leading anti-alligator poaching patrols in Florida's Everglades to training rangers at Lake Malawi National Park in Africa -- and being the current superintendent of Death Valley National Park. Now, after stewarding North America's hottest place for eight years, Reynolds, 62, who recently raised eyebrows as the only active superintendent to openly criticize Interior Department proposals to change national park management policies, has announced plans to retire early next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By James Rainey
For 27 straight summers, all that stood between runners and completion of the Badwater Ultramarathon was 135 miles of asphalt, a 13,000-foot elevation gain and late July temperatures that soared to 120 degrees and above. They called it "the toughest foot race in the world. " And not too many people argued. But this summer, the race from the depths of Death Valley to the shoulders of Mt. Whitney has been moved, while the National Park Service conducts a "safety assessment" of the run and other athletic events.
TRAVEL
July 9, 1995
Having spent more than 20 years hiking throughout the Wildrose Canyon area of Death Valley National Park, I feel compelled to correct errors in the Hiking column on Telescope Peak ("Getting a Larger Scope of Life Below," May 21). First, the round-trip hiking distance, as provided by the National Park Service, is 14 miles, not 5.2. Second, the elevation gain from the trail head at Mahogany Flat campground, elevation 8,133 feet, to the 11,049-foot summit is 2,916 feet, not 1,800. Finally, the map showed the former national monument boundaries and not those of the enlarged Death Valley National Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Death Valley National Park remained closed Wednesday as workers repaired roads and water mains damaged by extensive flash flooding over the weekend. Officials said it was unclear when visitors would be allowed back in the 3.3-million-acre park, which was hit by a thunderstorm Sunday night. Two people died when flash floods engulfed their car near Zabriskie Point. They were identified as Tabea Reith, 71, and her son, Bernherd, 48, of Downey.
TRAVEL
March 19, 2000
Regarding Susan Spano's "Leery of Long-Distance Driving? Roll On, With Some Precautions" (Her World, Feb. 27): On our first trip to Death Valley National Park, we also were surprised at the early darkness. I finally figured out why: The park is close to the boundary of the Mountain time zone, and many areas are below sea level, with the setting sun hidden by mountains. GUNTHER DUMALSKI Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
Death Valley National Park remained closed Wednesday as workers repaired roads and water mains damaged by extensive flash flooding over the weekend. Officials said it was unclear when visitors would be allowed back in the 3.3-million-acre park, which was hit by a thunderstorm Sunday night. Two people died when flash floods engulfed their car near Zabriskie Point. Authorities identified them as Tabea Reith, 71, and her son, Bernherd Reith, 48, both of Downey.
OPINION
February 4, 2014
Re "Athletes run out of Death Valley," Feb. 2 I read with great sadness that the athletes are being run out of Death Valley at the same time the region is being filled with more and more tourists in motorized vehicles. How ironic that on the day millions of Americans overindulged while sitting in front of their TV screens watching the Super Bowl, the runners and cyclists out there training were told by The Times that they will not have access to one of the premier natural venues for outdoor athletic competition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By James Rainey
For 27 straight summers, all that stood between runners and completion of the Badwater Ultramarathon was 135 miles of asphalt, a 13,000-foot elevation gain and late July temperatures that soared to 120 degrees and above. They called it "the toughest foot race in the world. " And not too many people argued. But this summer, the race from the depths of Death Valley to the shoulders of Mt. Whitney has been moved, while the National Park Service conducts a "safety assessment" of the run and other athletic events.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The Badwater 135 Ultramarathon race will go on - just not in Death Valley National Park, where it was scheduled for July 21-23. The park this week announced it was suspending spring and summer endurance events pending a safety review, which affected the Badwater event. The park will, however, accept applications for such events scheduled for Oct. 1 and beyond. "This is not about Badwater," park spokeswoman Cheryl Chipman said about the annual race that had begun at Badwater, Calif., the lowest point in the U.S., to the base of Mt. Whitney.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Death Valley National Park suspended permits for the iconic Badwater 135 Ultramarathon and other running and bicycling endurance events in the park until officials can complete a safety review, a statement on the park's website said Monday. AdventureCorps organizes the annual Badwater 135m which had been scheduled for July 21-23. Runners start in Badwater, the lowest point in the United States, and survive 135 rugged desert miles to climb to the base of Mt. Whitney at more than 8,000 feet in elevation.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Just because you didn't go to Death Valley National Park on Wednesday to celebrate the centennial of the World's Hottest Air Temperature doesn't mean you have to miss out on the cool anniversary merchandise. "Sometimes it's better to NOT GO, and just get the T-shirt online," Jon Klusmire, museum services director of the Eastern California Museum , wrote Wednesday in an email. I think he might be right, given that the top temperature in the park Wednesday was only 14 degrees lower than the record 134 degrees . T-shirts, lapel pins, patches and magnets mark the Big Heat day with the words "World's Hottest Death Valley 134° July 10, 2013 100th Anniversary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc
On a recent visit to Death Valley National Park, as tourists kept watchful eyes on dueling thermometers and temperatures soared near-record highs , Roxanne Melchiori and her family admired the breathtaking badlands. Then, she said, her 12-year-old daughter sniffed and made a face. It smelled like rotten eggs. They looked down at their feet and spotted the culprit: an egg cracked open and left sitting on a rock, ostensibly by someone who thought it might just be hot enough to fry one. It looked more “crystallized” than cooked, said Melchiori, an accountant from Rhode Island.
NEWS
February 1, 2005
Recent rains flooded Badwater Basin at Death Valley National Park, where 10,000 years ago a much larger lake lapped at the cliffs (that's Telescope Peak in the distance). Lake Manley may have gone the way of the wooly mammoths, but that didn't keep Larry, left, and Carol Wade of Mukilteo, Wash., from getting wet. Storms created this extensive puddle, up to 20 inches deep. "It's impressive to see that volume of water," says park spokesman Terry Baldino. One person rafted 11 miles down the Amargosa River in the south end of the park, an intermittent stream that seldom flows on the surface.
TRAVEL
February 28, 2010
These five parks regularly update wildflower reports on their websites during viewing season. They also post activity calendars with details on ranger and docent programs. Desert USA, http://www.desertusa.com/wildflo/ca.html , keeps track of conditions throughout the Southwest deserts. Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=638 Joshua Tree National Park, http://www.nps.gov/jotr Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, http://www.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Record heat is drawing tourists to Death Valley at possibly the most uncomfortable time of the year, where they are snapping a photograph next to a thermometer or attempting to fry an egg without a stove. Death Valley National Park has posted warnings to visitors on how to survive the heat.  It wouldn't seem a great time to visit, but on the other hand, the national park has issued an open invitation for folks to come celebrate the 100th anniversary of the hottest-ever temperature on the planet.     The thermometer soared to 134 degrees on July 10, 1913, at what's now the appropriately-named settlement of Furnace Creek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
After adjacent thermometers showed conflicting temperatures Sunday at Death Valley National Park, park rangers this morning resolved the debate over the precise peak temperature reached. According to the National Weather Service, Sunday's highest temperature was 129 degrees, making it the hottest June temperature ever recorded in the U.S. The soaring temperature also beat out the park's hottest temperature from last summer by one degree, according to park officials. "It's early for us to have these temperatures in June," said park spokeswoman Cheryl Chipman.
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