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Death Valley Unified School District

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2004 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
Here in the desert, where the ruthless sun punishes even the scorpions, a yellow school bus is delivering its delicate afternoon cargo. Exhausted children in T-shirts and shorts are sleeping on the vinyl seats or staring out the windows as the bus bounces along a rocky dirt road toward a colony of beat-up trailers and mobile homes 30 miles from school. A thermometer above the dashboard reads 104 degrees inside the cab -- and that's with the air conditioner running.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2004 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
Here in the desert, where the ruthless sun punishes even the scorpions, a yellow school bus is delivering its delicate afternoon cargo. Exhausted children in T-shirts and shorts are sleeping on the vinyl seats or staring out the windows as the bus bounces along a rocky dirt road toward a colony of beat-up trailers and mobile homes 30 miles from school. A thermometer above the dashboard reads 104 degrees inside the cab -- and that's with the air conditioner running.
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OPINION
October 3, 2004
Duke Helfand writes in Sept. 29's Column One, "Taking Heat Off Students," about Death Valley Unified School District possibly going on a four-day school week, and that it had tried out the schedule once before until the local high school was forced to close because of falling enrollment. Where did Death Valley high school students go then? A most uncommon arrangement sent them to another state, to Beatty, Nev. And it was almost 20 miles closer to boot. George Godwin Rowland Heights
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
School buses are likely to keep rolling for now, as the Legislature on Thursday restored $248 million for home-to-school transportation that was particularly crucial for small and rural school districts that need to take students across long distances. Gov. Jerry Brown, who eliminated the school busing money as of January after state revenues fell short of projections, has indicated that he supports the move. Educators throughout California had mobilized against the midyear elimination of all busing money, arguing that it would hit hardest remote districts such as Death Valley, which spends about $3,400 per student, compared to $26 or less for many suburban districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Death Valley -- As the day's first light streaks pink across the sky, a yellow school bus appears on a lonely road leading to an Indian village in Death Valley National Park. The bus rumbles past desert mesquite and ocher mountains to pick up Marlee RedWolf Rave for one of the longest school bus rides in California. It is 6:54 a.m. Marlee, a 14-year-old with raven hair and red nail polish, climbs aboard. She is one of nine students who spend more than two hours riding this bus 120 miles every school day to and from the Furnace Creek area to their school in Shoshone.
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