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Debit Cards

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Welfare recipients nationwide would be barred from using their government-issued debit cards at casinos, strip clubs and liquor stores under a bill to be introduced Wednesday by leaders of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee. A co-sponsor of the measure says he was inspired by the fact that nearly $5 million in cash benefits issued in California and meant to help struggling families feed and clothe their children, was spent or withdrawn from ATMs at casinos and poker rooms between January 2007 and May 2010.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 1998 | From Capitol Alert News Service
State lawmakers on Monday called for greater consumer protections on debit cards, unveiling legislation that would cap cardholders' liability for unauthorized use at $50. The bill, AB 1638 by Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa (D-Los Angeles) and Assemblywoman Valerie Brown (D-Kenwood), would also require banks to replace stolen funds due to fraudulent use within two business days.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For many shoppers, the question "paper or plastic?" is taking on a new meaning--that is, whether to use a check or a debit card. After years of negligible popularity, debit cards are starting to seriously compete with checks, particularly as banks offer and promote combined ATM/debit cards that can be used anywhere that credit cards are accepted.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1998 | Capitol Alert News Service
An Assembly committee approved legislation to grant users of debit cards protections similar to those enjoyed by credit cardholders. AB 1638 by Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa (D-Los Angeles) and Assemblywoman Valerie Brown (D-Kenwood) had failed in a legislative committee last week when Assembly Banking Committee Chairman Lou Papan (D-Millbrae) inadvertently closed the vote before fellow lawmaker Kerry Mazzoni (D-San Rafael) could register her support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1997 | THOMAS SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rule No. 1 on the card's back shouts it out: "Possession of this card by anyone other than the owner is a VIOLATION OF JAIL RULES." It's a warning to Los Angeles County Jail inmates--who use the cards to access petty cash while locked up--to watch their backs. The cards have sparked violence. Up to three years ago, inmates were allowed to carry cash to purchase items such as toothpaste, stationery, pens, pencils, cookies and candy bars, said Lt.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wells Fargo Bank next month will begin charging a $1 monthly fee for debit card transactions, part of a new round of fee hikes by banks seeking to shore up their bottom lines. Wells Fargo spokeswoman Kim Kellogg said the fee matches a transaction fee imposed last fall by archrival Bank of America. "We are meeting the competition," she said.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1998 | Capitol Alert News Service
A proposal to increase protections for debit card users stumbled in the Legislature when it failed to win the support of a key committee. Assembly Bill 1638 fell one vote short of passing the Assembly's Banking and Finance Committee. But proponents described the setback as temporary and said the measure will probably be approved when it is reconsidered by the committee next week.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
Visa U.S.A. and Mastercard International agreed to abandon a national debit card venture to settle charges by 14 states that they schemed to monopolize the emerging market, it was announced Tuesday. But the giant credit card associations--the world's largest with a combined 370 million cardholders worldwide--denied the allegations and said they agreed to the settlement partly to avoid a lengthy legal battle. Both said they would continue developing separate debit card systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to cash in on an increasingly cashless society, county toll road authorities are discussing ways of transforming their windshield toll transponders into rolling debit cards, good for the purchase of grub, gas, prescription drugs and more. Under the plan, the radio-signal gadgets that now smooth drivers' entry to the county's tollways could eventually be used at restaurants, gas stations, drugstores, dry cleaners and other drive-through businesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998 | KEN REICH
These days, more mail deliveries than not include at least one sales pitch for a credit or debit card. At my house, three or four such offers arrive every week. Recently, a $100 check was enclosed in one. Cash this, and you have our card, it said. I didn't cash it. My son David, a year out of Berkeley and earning a modest salary, recently was offered a card with a $10,000 credit limit. With one card already, he passed, recognizing he needs more debt before grad school like a hole in the head.
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