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Deborah Kerr

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1990 | TERRY ATKINSON
If Deborah Kerr is your cup of tea, then you can sip slowly from two of the British actress's films this weekend--though they're not quite her best. Also being served: one of 1990's most undeservingly neglected comedies. The Kerr dramas (both from MGM/UA and priced at $19.98) are "The Hucksters" (1947) and "Tea and Sympathy" (1956). Kerr's first U.S. film, "The Hucksters," took a relatively early stab at what would become a favorite Hollywood target in the '50s--advertising.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2011
"The Uninvited" Ray Milland, Gail Russell and Ruth Warrick star in this atmospheric 1944 haunted house thriller. "The Haunting" Robert Wise directed this 1963 terrifying ghost tale without a ghost in sight, starring Julie Harris. "The Innocents" Deborah Kerr plays a prim governess who believes her charges are possessed by evil sprits in this 1961 version of Henry James' "The Turn of the Screw. "
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Deborah Kerr, the acclaimed British actress whose versatile talent and refined screen persona made her one of Hollywood's top leading ladies in the 1950s in films such as "From Here to Eternity," "The King and I" and "An Affair to Remember," has died. She was 86. Kerr, who in recent years had Parkinson's disease, died Tuesday in Suffolk, in eastern England, her agent, Anne Hutton, said Thursday in London.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Deborah Kerr, the acclaimed British actress whose versatile talent and refined screen persona made her one of Hollywood's top leading ladies in the 1950s in films such as "From Here to Eternity," "The King and I" and "An Affair to Remember," has died. She was 86. Kerr, who in recent years had Parkinson's disease, died Tuesday in Suffolk, in eastern England, her agent, Anne Hutton, said Thursday in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1990 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though the recording industry is in an uproar over the Milli Villi scandal, lip-syncing--or ghost singing--has been a common practice in the movie industry almost since the advent of talkies. Marni Nixon is the best known of the ghost singers. An accomplished soloist in her own right, her lilting vocals can be heard on the sound tracks of many classic screen musicals. It was Nixon, not Deborah Kerr, who sang "Shall We Dance" and other Rodgers and Hammerstein standards in 1956's "The King & I."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1994 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
The Deborah Kerr line that everyone remembers from the 1956 film "Tea and Sympathy" is, of course, the one she delivers as she's about to sexually initiate an anguished prep school student: "When you speak of this in future years, and you will, be kind." Earlier in the film, however, there's a less portentous but more intriguing exchange between Kerr, as the compassionate housemaster's wife, and the student (John Kerr, no relation) about the vagaries of romance.
MAGAZINE
February 17, 1991
I'm disappointed. Of the red-haired actresses you mentioned, you left out one of the most beautiful--with the most gorgeous shade of red hair--Deborah Kerr. Having naturally medium-brown hair, I've been trying to match her shade of red for years, with no success. PATRICIA POSITO Chatsworth
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2011
"The Uninvited" Ray Milland, Gail Russell and Ruth Warrick star in this atmospheric 1944 haunted house thriller. "The Haunting" Robert Wise directed this 1963 terrifying ghost tale without a ghost in sight, starring Julie Harris. "The Innocents" Deborah Kerr plays a prim governess who believes her charges are possessed by evil sprits in this 1961 version of Henry James' "The Turn of the Screw. "
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1991 | LIBBY SLATE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I sat and watched the whole thing with my three grandchildren, who absolutely loved it, and I thought, 'It can't have been that long ago. And damn good it is, too!' Let's have a little ego this evening." Deborah Kerr is speaking of the 1956 film musical "The King and I," in which she starred as English governess Anna Leonowens opposite Yul Brynner as the Siamese monarch.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2003 | Editor -- Kinsey Lowe; Capsules -- Richard Cromelin and Kevin Crust
Friday Anything for Love Musical romance IDP/Samuel Goldwyn With: Isabel Rose, Cameron Bancroft, Andrew McCarthy, Eartha Kitt The idea: Woman whose reality doesn't live up to her dreams must choose between life with or without music. Writers: Robert Cary, Rose Director: Cary * So? Provocatively quaint. Bobby G. Can't Swim Drama Gabriel Film Group With: John-Luke Montias, Susan Mitchell, Vincent Vega The idea: Small-time drug dealer overreaches, plunging into a dark journey of redemption.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2003 | Editor -- Kinsey Lowe; Capsules -- Richard Cromelin and Kevin Crust
Friday Anything for Love Musical romance IDP/Samuel Goldwyn With: Isabel Rose, Cameron Bancroft, Andrew McCarthy, Eartha Kitt The idea: Woman whose reality doesn't live up to her dreams must choose between life with or without music. Writers: Robert Cary, Rose Director: Cary * So? Provocatively quaint. Bobby G. Can't Swim Drama Gabriel Film Group With: John-Luke Montias, Susan Mitchell, Vincent Vega The idea: Small-time drug dealer overreaches, plunging into a dark journey of redemption.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1994 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
The Deborah Kerr line that everyone remembers from the 1956 film "Tea and Sympathy" is, of course, the one she delivers as she's about to sexually initiate an anguished prep school student: "When you speak of this in future years, and you will, be kind." Earlier in the film, however, there's a less portentous but more intriguing exchange between Kerr, as the compassionate housemaster's wife, and the student (John Kerr, no relation) about the vagaries of romance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1991 | LIBBY SLATE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I sat and watched the whole thing with my three grandchildren, who absolutely loved it, and I thought, 'It can't have been that long ago. And damn good it is, too!' Let's have a little ego this evening." Deborah Kerr is speaking of the 1956 film musical "The King and I," in which she starred as English governess Anna Leonowens opposite Yul Brynner as the Siamese monarch.
MAGAZINE
February 17, 1991
I'm disappointed. Of the red-haired actresses you mentioned, you left out one of the most beautiful--with the most gorgeous shade of red hair--Deborah Kerr. Having naturally medium-brown hair, I've been trying to match her shade of red for years, with no success. PATRICIA POSITO Chatsworth
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1990 | TERRY ATKINSON
If Deborah Kerr is your cup of tea, then you can sip slowly from two of the British actress's films this weekend--though they're not quite her best. Also being served: one of 1990's most undeservingly neglected comedies. The Kerr dramas (both from MGM/UA and priced at $19.98) are "The Hucksters" (1947) and "Tea and Sympathy" (1956). Kerr's first U.S. film, "The Hucksters," took a relatively early stab at what would become a favorite Hollywood target in the '50s--advertising.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1990 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though the recording industry is in an uproar over the Milli Villi scandal, lip-syncing--or ghost singing--has been a common practice in the movie industry almost since the advent of talkies. Marni Nixon is the best known of the ghost singers. An accomplished soloist in her own right, her lilting vocals can be heard on the sound tracks of many classic screen musicals. It was Nixon, not Deborah Kerr, who sang "Shall We Dance" and other Rodgers and Hammerstein standards in 1956's "The King & I."
NEWS
October 4, 1992
Ann Straus, 82, fashion editor at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer during its heyday and a philanthropist honored by the Blind Children's Center in 1984 and 1990 for her extensive volunteer efforts. She worked for 15 years for MGM publicity chief Howard Strickling, primarily involving fashion publicity for such stars as Cyd Charisse, Angela Lansbury, Deborah Kerr, Greer Garson, Janet Leigh and Kathryn Grayson, among others. In Los Angeles on Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1994
After politely permitting me to rant last Sunday about The Times' unfortunate neglect of Deborah Kerr in the issues leading up to the Academy Awards, you added after my letter, "An article on Deborah Kerr and her career appeared in Calendar on March 21," leaving the impression with your "last word" that I didn't know what I was talking about. This statement is unfair and totally undercuts the significance of my comments, but even worse, it is untrue. In fact, there were no articles about Deborah Kerr through March 21, the date of the awards, and only a brief one on March 22 to which I referred in my original letter, complaining that it was completely segregated from the rest of the Oscar coverage, placed under a dance review amid lots of advertising.
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