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Deborah Meier

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MAGAZINE
November 11, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and NINA J. EASTON, Ronald Brownstein is a Times political writer. Nina J. Easton writes for The Times ' Calendar section
Break out the champagne. That's the way many Americans feel now that they have two years to recover before the President, members of Congress and hordes of state legislators next ask for their votes. And why not? This was a year filled with dreary campaigns between candidates who seemed incapable of rising above the muck of trivial personal attacks.
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NEWS
April 19, 1995 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If we are facing something that looks a lot like social revolution in America--a whole generation of young people at risk of failure, despair and violence--then the front-line of the struggle is the classroom at the public school down the street. Where else do we have a real chance of rescuing our children from the hopelessness that expresses itself in drug and alcohol abuse and open warfare on the streets?
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NEWS
April 19, 1995 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If we are facing something that looks a lot like social revolution in America--a whole generation of young people at risk of failure, despair and violence--then the front-line of the struggle is the classroom at the public school down the street. Where else do we have a real chance of rescuing our children from the hopelessness that expresses itself in drug and alcohol abuse and open warfare on the streets?
MAGAZINE
November 11, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and NINA J. EASTON, Ronald Brownstein is a Times political writer. Nina J. Easton writes for The Times ' Calendar section
Break out the champagne. That's the way many Americans feel now that they have two years to recover before the President, members of Congress and hordes of state legislators next ask for their votes. And why not? This was a year filled with dreary campaigns between candidates who seemed incapable of rising above the muck of trivial personal attacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Frederick Wiseman makes films in which patterns and meanings gradually emerge. But a pattern is also emerging in Wiseman's career, and his latest work, "High School II," confirms it. The early Wiseman films, while seemingly removed from their subjects, were considerable social critiques of institutions, from mental hospitals and the welfare system to the meat industry--and public schools, which came off rather badly in Wiseman's 1968 "High School," about Philadelphia's Northeast High.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Animal Talk," a musical play in a TV talk-show setting--featuring a Persian cat named Catty Lee as host--was created by entertainment professionals for the HOLA Youth Theatre. Though less professional in execution, it gives its audience plenty to think about. This earnest mix of entertainment and education, presented at Immanuel Presbyterian Church by adults and children, puts a kid-size spin on respecting the importance and the interdependence of all life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
The wind howls. A prison security buzzer blares. Then a woman begins to sing, generating a warmth that thaws her surroundings. These first moments telegraph the rest of "The Spitfire Grill," a little musical short on subtlety but long on charm. It's adapted from a 1996 movie that, to some tastes, was too on-the-nose. But as reworked by James Valcq and Fred Alley, this tale of renewal is like a set of arms, patiently waiting to wrap its audience in a hug.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2000 | JONATHAN SCHORR
To Hollywood, "Music of the Heart" was horror movie wizard Wes Craven's touching attempt at "Scream"-free fare. But to people who care about education, the film was a horror of a familiar kind. "Music," just out on video, is billed by Miramax as the "extraordinary and inspirational true story" of Roberta Guaspari, a music teacher at Harlem's Central Park East Elementary School.
NEWS
June 16, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
A Caltech physicist who played a key role in developing an all-encompassing "theory of everything" was named Monday as one of the 32 winners of the 1987 MacArthur Foundation fellowships, which provide a five-year, tax-free stipend. John Schwarz, 45, will receive $280,000 over the five years to spend in any way he sees fit. His fellowship is among four given this year to physicists working in the esoteric field of super-strings, the foundation of the "theory of everything."
OPINION
July 20, 2004 | Martin Bickman
For much of its history, American education has seemed more like a battleground between warring factions than an evolving and cumulative field of increasingly refined concepts and methods. On one side we get books by E.D. Hirsch and Diane Ravitch blaming the progressive tradition itself, with its concern for process and student-centered activity, for the current failings of our schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2003 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
In a crowded field of disaffected and iconoclastic playwrights, Arlene Hutton is a breed apart. One of the most richly humane voices in contemporary theater, she drips balm, not acid, on the chafed psyches of her grateful audiences. Set in an 1838 Shaker community, Hutton's "As It Is in Heaven," now at Actors Co-op, soothes without benumbing.
BOOKS
July 16, 1995 | Vartan Gregorian, Vartan Gregorian is a professor of history and president of Brown University
In his 1835 classic, "Democracy in America," Alexis de Tocqueville coined the term individualism to describe the essential American character. "Individualism is a word . . . to describe a new idea," he wrote. "Our fathers only knew about egoism."
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