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Deborah Small

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April 19, 1992 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, Susan Freudenheim is the arts editor at the San Diego Edition of The Times. and
Deborah Small has spent the past year investigating the murders of 45 San Diego women, reading pulp bodice-ripper romance novels and tracking down interracial love scenes in Hollywood movies. None of this has been just for pleasure: Small's work over the last decade has turned research into art, combining revisionist history and visual spectacle.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1992 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, Susan Freudenheim is the arts editor at the San Diego Edition of The Times. and
Deborah Small has spent the past year investigating the murders of 45 San Diego women, reading pulp bodice-ripper romance novels and tracking down interracial love scenes in Hollywood movies. None of this has been just for pleasure: Small's work over the last decade has turned research into art, combining revisionist history and visual spectacle.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER
With the National Endowment for the Arts under siege over funding policy and much of the arts community trying to put its least controversial foot forward, you might think that four dissident artists who love to ruffle the status quo would be less public with their provocations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER
With the National Endowment for the Arts under siege over funding policy and much of the arts community trying to put its least controversial foot forward, you might think that four dissident artists who love to ruffle the status quo would be less public with their provocations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1991
Congratulations, San Diego Police Chief Bob Burgreen; congratulations, San Diego artists Deborah Small, Elizabeth Sisco, Scott Kessler and Louis Hock; congratulations to the National Endowment for the Arts. With a bit of awareness made public by concerned artists in the form of bus bench posters placed at various places in the city, funded partly by the NEA, a sad situation has been addressed by and hopefully corrected by the San Diego police chief and the department as a whole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1990
Artists Louis Hock, Elizabeth Sisco, Scott Kessler, Deborah Small, et al., should be commended for their work ("Bus Bench Art Within NEA Guidelines," Nov. 3). These artists were granted National Endowment for the Arts money "to extend our exploration of the way art can illuminate contradictions and act as a catalyst for local debate." Their work is right on target. Indeed, these ads have "illuminated contradictions" by bringing renewed interest into the questionable activities of the San Diego Police Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1992
Regarding "Art as Public Works Project," Susan Freudenheim's profile of artist and teacher Deborah Small (April 19): So Small thinks that the lack of a commercial market here in San Diego is a healthy thing for artists ("Since you can't sell here, there's no pressure to conform to a commercial market. I think that's very healthy"). It is this kind of attitude, usually adopted by college-trained, college-supported artists, that I find so repugnant. I am forced to work at a low-paying, frustrating service job that is not so slowly driving me crazy because, although I have exhibited my art in galleries, museums, art centers, coffeehouses, restaurants, etc., in Los Angeles and San Diego and on the East Coast, I cannot, in this culturally bereft town, support myself from the sale of my own work.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1987 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Citing a lack of sales, Anuska Galerie will close Dec. 24, the final day of its current exhibit of cubist relief paintings by Marjorie Nodelman, gallery owner Anuska Smith said Friday. Anuska is the fourth contemporary art gallery to fold this year in San Diego. "I don't have the financial support any more," Smith said. "I have to pay my rent. I don't have the money, and I can not put myself deeper in debt."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of local artists have spent federal grant money to rent 25 bus benches for ads that criticize the use of deadly force by the San Diego Police Department, triggering controversy and leaving the police chief and many others furious. The art on the benches features the outline of seven human bodies silhouetted in black against a blood-red background. Within each human figure is a target, similar to those at police shooting ranges.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1992 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, SAN DIEGO COUNTY ARTS EDITOR
With the assurance of a $50,000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and a list of 33 participating artists plus two artists' collaboratives, the long-awaited binational exhibition co-organized by San Diego's Museum of Contemporary Art and the Centro Cultural de la Raza will open at the two museums March 2, officials from both institutions announced Thursday. The show will be titled "La Frontera/The Border: Art About the Mexico/United States Border Experience."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A controversial 33-foot statue of the Spanish explorer Balboa--described by critics as "an eyesore and a joke"--will lay claim to a spot in Balboa Park, the San Diego City Council decided Monday. The bronze statue, created by Tijuana artist Guillermo Castano and donated to the city by Elizabeth and Gaye North, will be erected in the Palisades area of the park, a section now occupied by parking lots but earmarked as a landscaped pedestrian zone.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1992 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM
In the manner of most television shows about art exhibitions, "1492 Revisited" can't decide whether it is about art, artsy filming or information. It tries to be all of these, and in doing so, loses its potential impact.
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