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Debt Collection

BUSINESS
November 11, 2007 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
The voice-mail message was angry and unrelenting. "The situation will not die, I guarantee you!" the woman said in a steely voice, adding that she would call "every day." It was not a stalker or a jilted lover. It was a debt collection company. And it was illegal harassment, according to the Federal Trade Commission, because the caller went on to threaten that the person's wages would be seized.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- A Van Nuys debt collection operation and the people who ran it agreed to pay $1.1 million to settle federal allegations they improperly bullied consumers to get them to repay overdue bills and deceived clients about fees. The settlement ends a case that began in 2011 against Forensic Case Management Services Inc. and permanently bars the owner, David M. Hynes II, and other officers in the company from the debt collection business, the Federal Trade Commission said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Two sheriff's deputies sat conspicuously in the lobby of the Wilshire Hotel in Koreatown on Thursday. They were there to collect a multimillion-dollar debt. In March, a Superior Court judge ordered the company that runs the hotel to pay the city of Los Angeles nearly $3.5 million for unpaid transit occupancy taxes, known as bed taxes. City officials say the company, Majestic Towers, never paid up. So they turned to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, which serves court orders, to play debt collector.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Anyone who has checked into a hospital knows that once you check out, you'll be confronted with a staggeringly expensive, dizzyingly confusing bill. But what is not common knowledge is that many of these bills contain errors that can cost consumers and their insurers thousands of dollars. How big and how common are the errors? The answer depends on whom you ask.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2008 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
The long arm of the law reaches only so far, according to a federal appeals court. In a win for consumers, a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled this week that a San Clemente debt collection company could be sued for alleged overly aggressive tactics, even when the company is working on behalf of prosecutors. The appeals court ruled in a lawsuit against American Corrective Counseling Services Inc.
NEWS
December 23, 1998 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bats and balls are gone, the uniforms consigned to the nostalgia bin. The Mission Viejo Vigilantes play only in court now, with the city suing the team and the team suing the city. The minor-league baseball team vacated its offices soon after its second season in Mission Viejo ended in September. The team disconnected its phone and left no forwarding address, leaving an angry band of creditors wondering when--and if--they might get paid.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virtually unnoticed among the many superpower negotiations, the United States and Soviet Union are trying to settle U.S. claims of more than $1 billion on debts that predate the Bolshevik Revolution, including old czarist bonds bought by Americans. Recent U.S.-Soviet commercial talks have focused on Soviet efforts to obtain most-favored-nation trading status, which would enable the Soviets to get the U.S. government credits and loans they need to resuscitate their economy.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Chicago-based Montgomery Ward Holding Corp. may have violated practices related to the collection of debt from credit card customers, based on an internal audit by the retailer's majority shareholder. General Electric Co.'s GE Capital Services unit said an internal audit of debt collection practices identified some "issues which we're moving swiftly to rectify," according to spokesman John Oliver. Oliver said GE was confident that the matter won't be material to GE or Montgomery Ward.
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