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Debt Collection

NATIONAL
April 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
After suffering paralysis, brain damage, lost limbs and other wounds in war, nearly 900 soldiers have been saddled with $1.2 million in government debt because of the military's "complex, cumbersome" pay system, congressional investigators said Thursday.
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NATIONAL
December 8, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The government can seize part of a person's monthly Social Security benefit to pay off old student loans, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. The 9-0 ruling gives the government another way of collecting on more than $7 billion in delinquent student loans, many of which have gone unpaid for 10 years or more. It could cost retirees as much as 15% of their monthly benefit. Generally, Social Security benefits had been shielded from seizure.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2005 | Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writer
Make no mistake about it, the Internal Revenue Service wants Americans to pay their delinquent tax bills. The trouble is, it doesn't seem to have the staff to collect from those taxpayers who have been remiss. So the agency no one likes to hear from is turning to the industry no one likes to hear from: private debt-collection firms.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2003 | From Associated Press
A Turkish freighter tied up on the Delaware River for more than four months will be sold to pay off the owner's debt, a federal judge has ruled, allowing its crew members to finally come ashore. The eight crew members who have watched summer turn to fall from aboard the 499-foot Ahmetbey at a Philadelphia pier will be returned to Turkey, U.S. District Judge John R. Padova ruled. Ann-Michelle Higgins, an attorney for Odin Denizcilik A.S.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2003 | From Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission is trying harder to collect fines it levies on corporate wrongdoers but has recovered less than 50% in recent years by some measures, a congressional report released Thursday found. In an update of a 1998 report, the General Accounting Office found the SEC and Commodity Futures Trading Commission had collected about 94% and 99%, respectively, of the total dollars levied in cases closed from January 1997 through August 2002.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2003 | Stanley Allison, Times Staff Writer
More than 300 parents who lost their driver's licenses for failing to make child-support payments descended on the Orange County Department of Child Support Services offices Saturday to reclaim their ability to drive legally -- if they can pay some of the money they owe. Parents started to line up outside the offices about 6:30 a.m., said Angel Monico, public outreach manager for the department. Thirty-nine workers were on hand to handle the crowd from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2003 | Hugo Martin and Sue Fox, Times Staff Writers
Only three years after California overhauled its beleaguered child-support system, the state's budget crisis is expected to inflict layoffs, hiring freezes and spending cuts on agencies in some counties that already have among the state's worst records for collecting child support. Anticipating a $40-million cut in funding to child-support agencies statewide, San Bernardino County, with a collection rate of 36%, has issued layoff notices to 60 child-support workers.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2003 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles officials scoured 324,000 electronic files in the process of hunting down Don Mann, an admitted business-tax violator. But in his case, at least, their prize looks pretty paltry: If Mann's accountant is correct, all that searching will lead the Van Nuys resident to cough up about $100 in delinquent business license taxes. Mann, a freelance movie consultant, concedes that he didn't pay the tax. He didn't know about it, he says.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Kmart Corp. demanded the repayment of all executive retention loans made before the discount retailer filed for bankruptcy protection and fired the five remaining recipients of the bonuses still with the company. An internal probe found that management under former Chairman Charles Conaway didn't properly disclose information with the board when it set up the loan program in 2001, Kmart said.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2002 | Dennis Walters, Bloomberg News
A bankruptcy filing by a Los Angeles hospital that relied on financing from National Century Financial Enterprises Inc. leaves future payments on almost $19 million in municipal debt in doubt, a trustee for bondholders said. Granada Hills Community Hospital, which borrowed from National Century this year, filed for bankruptcy protection Nov. 26, and monthly principal and interest payments haven't been met since September, a Dec. 2 notice to investors from U.S. Bank said. The notice said U.S.
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