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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
Two alleged pimps - accused of smuggling a Mexican woman into Orange County and forcing her into prostitution to pay off the debt of an ill family member - were arraigned Wednesday on charges related to human trafficking and prostitution, prosecutors said. Victor Lara Romero, 32, and Gustavo Romero Clemente, 35, have each been charged with one felony count of human trafficking, one felony count of pimping and one felony count of pandering, according to a statement from the Orange County district attorney's office.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 2010
Recent university graduate Amy Horwath has grasped the golden ring in this weak economy: a job in her chosen field. Just one problem: She's $50,000 in debt, mostly student loans. "Sometimes it seems overwhelming," said Horwath, 23, sitting in her small apartment, where her Cornell University diploma for hotel administration hangs on the wall. "I feel like I'm barely treading water." Horwath belongs to a generation of college graduates who traded debt for degrees. Graduating seniors leave college with an average of $23,000 in student loans, according to FinAid, a student financial aid website.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1986
Could someone explain the value of jump-starting an economic recovery, already sustained for 3 1/2 years by debt, with lower interest rates and yet, more debt? Whenever companies or individuals try this method, as I did some 16 years ago, the result is disaster and for many, like me, bankruptcy. Debt upon debt is not recovery, but, a growing bubble of bills and when it explodes it will drop IOUs on my kids and grandchildren. Of course the reply envelope will be addressed to Washington, D.C. PAUL RICHARD San Francisco
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1993
"U.S. Debt: Fatal Millstone or Humdrum Fact of Life" (Aug. 18) insinuates that we shouldn't worry too much about the debt, because the economists haven't agreed on when the boom will fall. Presumably you would be satisfied walking blindfolded toward a cliff, so long as no one told you exactly where the edge was. DERON A. WALTERS, Goleta
SPORTS
August 25, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
Manchester United's decision to go public this month by selling shares on the New York Stock Exchange is another reminder that the financial foundation of European soccer remains in desperate need of repair. Man-U is among the most storied and iconic brands in global sports - and after being valued at $2.2 billion, it's also the most expensive sports franchise in the world. The New York Yankees are relative upstarts when compared to Manchester United, which started play in 1878, a decade before Jack the Ripper claimed his first victim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2013 | By Evan Halper and Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown proclaimed last week that California, which now has enough cash to pay its day-to-day bills, can no longer be described by naysayers as a "failed state. " But even though it appears to be free of the deficit that dogged the Capitol in recent years, the state is no model of financial health. Sacramento is legally obligated to pay many billions of dollars withheld from schools, local governments and healthcare providers as lawmakers struggled repeatedly to balance the books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
If you are a woman, Gloria Steinem is like an indispensable computer program, always running in the background of your life. You don't always remember that she's there, but without her, your life would be constrained in ways you can hardly imagine. Run for office? Lead a company? Become an engineer? Go to space? Work free of sexual harassment or live on equal legal footing with your husband? Control your own reproductive fate? So many of the rights that women enjoy -- even the most conservative women -- exist because of relentless feminists like Steinem, who, at 79, shows no signs of slowing down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2010 | By Scott Gold and Kim Christensen, Los Angeles Times
The small and cash-strapped city of Bell is on the hook for a $35-million bond debt that voters didn't approve — and that the city can't afford to pay off, The Times has learned. The debt, which Bell took on three years ago to buy land near the 710 Freeway, is more than twice the size of Bell's annual operating budget. Come November, the city could lose the land to foreclosure. The city's hope to profit from the purchase fell apart in 2008 after city officials failed to conduct basic environmental reviews.
OPINION
January 31, 1988
It would also help if Americans would "Buy American"--those items which are still made here. Just for starters, American autos are getting better and better. W. SPANGENBERG Hawthorne
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