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Decline

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The sardine fishing boat Eileen motored slowly through moonlit waters from San Pedro to Santa Catalina Island, its weary-eyed captain growing more desperate as the night wore on. After 12 hours and $1,000 worth of fuel, Corbin Hanson and his crew returned to port without a single fish. "Tonight's pretty reflective of how things have been going," Hanson said. "Not very well. " To blame is the biggest sardine crash in generations, which has made schools of the small, silvery fish a rarity on the West Coast.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Dan Loumena
The underachieving Washington Capitals began making changes at the top Saturday, firing Adam Oates as coach and not renewing the contract of George McPhee, the general manager and a vice president. The NHL club made the announcements in a statement Saturday morning. The Capitals missed the playoffs for the first time since 2007 despite having the league's top goal scorer in Alex Ovechkin, who scored 51 times this season. Oates had one year left on his three-year contract. The Capitals were 38-30-14 this season and went 65-48-17 under Oates in his two seasons.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
Less than a year after reaching its long-sought goal of 10,000 officers, the Los Angeles Police Department is now seeing a steady decline in its ranks as the city struggles to find enough qualified candidates. Fewer people are applying to join the LAPD and, of those who do, a significantly higher number of them are being disqualified from consideration. Officials say budget cuts have slashed the advertising used to draw recruits while other departments are luring top talent with higher salaries than the LAPD offers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
Throughout the arduous college application process, Brown University was on the top of Madeline Anderson's wish list. So when the Long Beach high school senior received a rejection from the Ivy League campus, she was disappointed but also knew she had tons of company. The Rhode Island campus accepted just 8.6% of the 30,432 students who had applied for freshman admission, a historic low and down from 9.2% last year. Many other elite colleges across the country also reported dips in their acceptance rates, fueled by a rise in applications from overseas, particularly Asia, and by a trend among high school seniors to try their luck at more schools, experts say. "It did make me upset at first.
NEWS
September 6, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Despite the wince factor associated with the news last week that a paintball caused a British woman's breast implant to explode, paintball injuries have actually fallen in the United States. The federal government says that hospital emergency visits due to air and paintball guns fell 20% from 2006 to 2008. The numbers don't indicate why paintball injuries may be declining, but there is more awareness about injury prevention these days. According to the stats , from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, most injuries occur in males and people under age 17. More than 25% were in kids ages 10 to 14. Low-income children and adults are more likely than higher-income people to be treated for paintball and air gun injuries.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
On Friday afternoon, while South by Southwest festival attendees were sleeping off hangovers or busy making new ones, in a conference room at the Austin Convention Center, record people were discussing the return of indie record stores, the success of the annual Record Store Day and their vision for the future of brick and mortar music shopping. The panel was dubbed "Record Stores Are Dead. Long Live Record Stores. " It's not the most earth-shattering story coming out of Austin, Texas, but it is a curious one, considering that in 2014, technology start-ups and snack chip sponsorships rule the conversation.
SPORTS
November 27, 2012
Pau Gasol's decline Since the 2011 playoffs, when Phil Jackson slapped Pau Gasol in the chest to try to inspire him, the Lakers power forward has seen his production drop in most categories. A look at his play over the last 18 months, versus Gasol's career averages in 12 NBA seasons. Regular season Season;     FG; FGA; FG%; FT; FTA; FT%; REBS; BLKS; PTS; 2011-12;    7.1; 14.1; .501; 3.1; 4.0; .782; 10.4; 1.4; 17.4; 2012-13*;   5.4; 12.4; .434; 2.5; 3.4; .729; 9.1; 1.3; 13.4; Career;      7.0; 13.5; .519; 4.5; 6.0; .752; 9.2; 1.7; 18.6; *through 14 games Playoffs 2010-11;   4.7; 11.2; .420; 3.6; 4.5; .800; 7.8; 1.7; 13.1; 2011-12;   5.2; 11.9; .434; 2.0; 2.4; .828; 9.5; 2.1; 12.5; Career;     6.6; 12.9; .517; 4.0; 5.3; .742; 9.6; 1.9; 17.3; Source: basketball-reference.com
BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Factory orders fell again in January, but the rate of decline lessened after a steeper-than-initially-estimated drop the previous month, the Commerce Department said Thursday. New orders for manufactured goods, a key indicator of future factory output, were down 0.7% in January to $483 billion. Analysts projected orders would decline 0.5%. It was the second straight monthly decline and the harsh winter weather in much of the country probably was a factor. PHOTOS: Federal Reserve chairs through the years December's decline was revised down to 2% from an initial estimate of 1.5%, the Commerce Department said.
NEWS
July 8, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
One in five high school students in the U.S. is still smoking, and the rate of decline in smoking has slowed, according to a new report released Thursday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smoking rates among high school students slowed dramatically from the late 1990s through the early 2000s. But those rates of decline decreased more gradually from the early to late 2000s. The CDC analyzed data from the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey of high school students in public and private schools in all states and the District of Columbia.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2012 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
Economists brushed off a decline in new residential construction starts last month and instead looked at an increase in permits issued for houses and apartment buildings as a positive indicator that the real estate market is on the mend. Housing starts fell 1.1% from January to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 698,000, the Commerce Department reported. That was a 34.7% surge from February 2011. Starts were down 5.9% from January in the West and 12.3% in the Northeast. They were up 1.5% in the South and 3.0% in the Midwest.
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | From Times staff writers
The Dodgers and Major League Baseball declined to comment Monday about a magazine article detailing Yasiel Puig's dangerous escape from Cuba and the death threats the 23-year-old right fielder received last year from human traffickers under control of a major Mexican drug cartel. Through a team spokesman, Puig also declined to comment on the story, which is scheduled to run in the May issue of Los Angeles Magazine. Puig has never talked about how he left Cuba. The Dodgers and MLB wouldn't say what measures they have taken to ensure the safety of Puig and his teammates, though the club is known to have hired full-time security detail last year.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
Another plunge in once-soaring technology stocks sent the Nasdaq composite index into a triple-digit decline and pushed the rest of the stock market down with it. Erstwhile darlings such as Netflix Inc. and Facebook Inc., as well as biotechnology highfliers such as Intercept Pharmaceuticals Inc., sank as investors rushed to cash in what remained of earlier profits. As of 10:55 a.m. Pacific, the Nasdaq composite index was down 107.50 points, or 2.6%, to 4,076.41. PHOTOS: Richest and poorest cities in America The Dow Jones industrial average skidded 176.57 points, or 1.1%, to 16,260.61.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
A plunge in once-soaring technology shares sent Nasdaq into a triple-digit decline and yanked the rest of the stock market down with it. Erstwhile darlings such as Netflix Inc. and Facebook Inc., as well as biotechnology highfliers such as Intercept Pharmaceuticals Inc., sank Thursday as investors fled many names they had favored just a few weeks ago. The sell-off was less a result of economic developments as it was the hard reality of a...
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014
For investors, a volatile stock market passed a worrisome milestone on Monday. The market logged its longest losing streak in two months, and extended a sell-off that began last week. After biotechnology and internet stocks pulled the market lower on Friday, it was companies that sell non-essential goods and services that dragged on the market to start the week. Concerns about earnings and sales drove declines. CarMax slumped after the used car dealer reported lower net income, and Mattel dropped on concerns about demand for big-name toys.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - When you're raking in tens of billions of dollars in profits by helping credit-elite borrowers buy homes, couldn't you lighten up on fees a little for everyday folks who'd also like to buy? That's a question increasingly being posed to government-controlled home mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and their federal regulators. Though most buyers are unaware of the practice, Fannie and Freddie - by far the largest sources of mortgage money in the country - continue to charge punitive, recession-era fees that can add thousands of dollars to consumers' financing costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
Prime-time television dramas are less smoke friendly than they were in the 1950s. According to a study published online in the journal Tobacco Control on Thursday, there has been a dramatic decline in visibility of tobacco products on prime-time U.S. broadcast television. Researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania determined this drop in portrayals of smoking and tobacco use in prime-time dramas mirrored the national decline in consumption.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2010 | By Alejandro Lazo
The U.S. foreclosure crisis has started to "plateau," with the number of U.S. homes in some stage of the process declining 9% in April from the month before, according to RealtyTrac. Homes receiving some kind of foreclosure filing in April — a notice of default, scheduled auction or bank repossession — declined 2% from April 2009, the first year-over-year drop since the Irvine company began publishing its monthly report in January 2005. One in every 387 homes received a foreclosure filing last month, RealtyTrac said.
SPORTS
October 4, 2011 | By Dylan Hernandez
The Dodgers on Tuesday declined club options for next season on third baseman Casey Blake and pitcher Jon Garland. The moves were expected. Blake's season ended with a neck operation and Garland's with shoulder surgery. Blake's option was for $6 million and Garland's for $8 million. The Dodgers will pay Blake a $1.25-million buyout and Garland $500,000. Both players will become free agents five days after the end of the World Series. The Dodgers also removed record-breaking utility man Eugenio Velez from their 40-man roster and demoted him to triple-A Albuquerque.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
NEW YORK - The elderly woman had stopped by the Jewish Community Center in the Canarsie area of Brooklyn and was shuffling away, leaning heavily on her walker, when a young man punched her in the head as he walked past, knocking her to the ground. When she returned to the center for help, the staff called for an ambulance, vigilant that this might have been another example of the "knockout game," a social media trend that had young people punching out random individuals on the street last year.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Jerry Hirsch
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators twice declined to investigate faulty ignition switches in General Motors Co. cars that led to 13 deaths - even though one official found "a pattern" of problems, according to a new congressional report. The report, released Sunday, added fresh details to a controversy that has shaken the revitalized automaker. Already under fire for lengthy delays in recalling the vehicles, GM also was accused in the report of allowing the defective part to be installed in millions of vehicles after testing showed it did not meet the company's own specifications.
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