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May 16, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
About 10 tornadoes slashed through parts of North Texas, leaving at least six people dead, dozens injured and more than 100 homes damaged or destroyed as the tornado season got off to a frenzied start. At least three Texas counties -- Hood, Johnson and Montague -- were struck by tornadoes that began Wednesday evening and cut a wide swath through the region, where tornado activity is an annual occurrence. Weather observer teams will inspect the region, but the preliminary count of twisters by the National Weather Service stood at 10 by Thursday morning.
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NEWS
October 24, 1987 | MYRA VANDERPOOL GORMLEY
Barnetta McGhee White, a professor of education at North Carolina Central University in Durham, N.C., is the author of a family history. Many genealogists spend years researching their Many genealogists spend years researching their family trees and eventually get around to publishing a family history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles real estate investor who told The Times that his signature had been forged on two deeds notarized by Ben Karmelich, president of Highland Federal Savings & Loan Assn., has changed his mind and signed an affidavit saying the signatures were genuine after all. "Upon checking my records, there was absolutely no fraud or forgery," Syed Mouzzam Ali said in the sworn statement. "I signed the two deeds."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A variety of federal and state officials are reviewing the activities of a network of Los Angeles slum financiers to determine whether any of them has engaged in criminal conduct or violated civil law, officials said Wednesday. The U.S.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | From Associated Press
The director of the Bureau of Land Management said Monday that it is time to scrap part of an 1872 mining law because of the public perception that it leads to dirt-cheap sales of government lands. He called for elimination of the law's fee structure, which allows miners to purchase valuable patents, or deeds, for as little as $2.50 per acre. "I know and everybody else who understands the business knows that it may cost $10,000 to get to that point where you buy the $2.50 patent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1988 | BOB JAMES, Times Staff Writer
When Juan Perez sold part of his ranch, the Pasa de Bartolo, to Bernardo Visarlo for a little more than $2,000, he probably did not think it was a historic occasion. But that March 21, 1850, real estate deal and a copy of the handwritten deed to the Pasa de Bartolo became Page 1 in Volume 1 of the Los Angeles County recorder's deed book. Deeds are no longer handwritten or are they kept in bound volumes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1990 | ROSE ELLEN O'CONNOR and GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In February, 1988, Laguna Niguel officials sat down with a developer to swap some land for the public good: The developer was to give up eight scenic acres of open space and in return Laguna Niguel was to give up three acres of slopes. Last week, the officials were dismayed to learn that they had actually given up not three acres but 96 that were supposed to have been reserved for future parkland.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | ROSE ELLEN O'CONNOR and DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
District attorney's investigators are examining contradictory documents that raise new questions about whether Laguna Niguel officials approved a 1988 transaction that deeded 96 acres of potential parkland to a housing developer, city officials say. One is a resolution indicating that the Laguna Niguel Community Services District board approved the land deal by a 4-0 vote on Jan. 20, 1988, with then-president Patricia Bates absent.
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