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Defense Cuts

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OPINION
June 14, 2010 | Benjamin Friedman and Christopher Preble
Recent reporting has claimed that the Pentagon is fighting to trim the defense budget, valiantly protecting taxpayer dollars against a wasteful Congress and tackling the ballooning federal deficit. There are two problems with that claim. For one, the fiscal year 2011 defense budget, which Congress is set to adopt, actually increases spending, though at a slightly reduced rate, which only in Washington would be considered a "cut." Second, and most critical, the latest Pentagon authorization does nothing to address the cause of U.S. military spending profligacy: overambitious and nonessential objectives overseas.
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NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Sara Lessley
On the eve of the sequester cuts this week, Rep. Howard P. “Buck” McKeon  scolded President Obama in a Times Op-Ed article . The chairman of the House Armed Services Committee wrote: “The president is forcing America to indulge him in this dangerous experiment with national security.”  By the score, Times letter writers emailed their reactions, almost all sharply rebuking the Santa Clarita Republican. Wrote Kyle Laurent from Newhall, echoing a common theme about blame: “Nowhere in Buck McKeon's partisan rant did he ever point out the Republicans' responsibility for the stalemate on the 'sequester.'  President Obama, as a way to get conservatives to the bargaining table, agreed to the sequester only after many days of foot-dragging by politicians on the right.
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NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. -- Rep. Paul Ryan went deep into military country Thursday to make the case that President Obama is threatening national security by presiding over huge planned cuts in defense spending -- cuts that Ryan himself helped create as a member of Congress. Speaking to an audience near Ft. Bragg dominated by military contractors, retired military officers and their families, Ryan insisted that he voted for the budget bill that resulted in the so-called sequester in 2011 despite strong objections over its planned cuts to the military.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
For the last several months, Gregory Bloom has worried about his small Irvine aerospace business and what would happen if federal funds were held back - or "sequestered" - because of Congress' inability to reach a budget agreement. And now his worst fears are approaching. Cuts in the nation's defense budget could total $3.2 billion in California alone, and Bloom knows the Southland could be hit hard in the months ahead with payrolls, contracts and plans all in doubt. "We could wake up and face a world we've never seen before," Bloom said.
NEWS
September 15, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- Republicans on Saturday hammered President Obama over looming cuts to defense spending, saying the president has shown a "failure to lead" and done nothing to protect the military from being "hollowed" out by spending reductions. “The president himself has opposed or disregarded every attempt we've made to work with him on a solution,” said Rep. Allen West (R-Fla.), delivering the GOP weekly address. Obama and Hill Republicans, including West, agreed last year to slash spending on both defense and domestic programs if they could not reach a broader compromise on how to reduce the deficit.
NEWS
August 4, 2011 | By David S. Cloud
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta warned Thursday that deeper cuts in the defense budget risked hollowing out the military and would hamper Pentagon efforts to deal with rising powers such as China, North Korea and Iran.   It was the second day in a row that Panetta issued a public warning to Congress not to go beyond the roughly $400 billion in defense cuts required over the next decade under the debt reduction bill signed this week by President Obama.   Speaking to reporters at his first Pentagon news conference, Panetta called on Congress to raise tax revenue and cut mandatory spending programs, which include Medicare and Social Security, rather than slash defense further.
OPINION
December 17, 1989
Before we begin to make the deep military budget cuts presently being proposed by Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney, let us wait for the Soviets to turn their talk and promises of peace and disarmament into reality. It would be foolish for us to cut our defenses during this delicate time in Eastern Europe. Both World War I and World War II started from the collapse of powerful empires: We may now be witnessing the collapse of the Soviet empire. Consequently, I believe we should be cautious and avoid the discredited McGovernite policy of unilateral disarmament.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan
LIMA, Ohio - Republican vice presidential hopeful Paul D.  Ryan opened an Ohio campaign swing on Monday by hammering President Obama over the Pentagon's proposed suspension of tank production at a plant that has long provided high-paying jobs in this struggling region of the Rust Belt. The Wisconsin congressman told hundreds of Republicans at a veterans hall that Obama's “only eagerness to cut spending” was on national defense. He blasted the president for proposing federal budgets that included the Army's proposed mothballing of the Lima tank plant.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- Former Vice President Dick Cheney is headed to Capitol Hill to offer congressional Republicans some budgeting advice. Cheney is scheduled to meet Tuesday evening with top House GOP leaders to warn against Pentagon cuts, scheduled for January, that Congress agreed to in last summer's debt deal with the White House. Cheney also met behind closed doors with Senate Republicans at their weekly luncheon. The visit comes as Republicans are making an orchestrated effort to attack Obama on defense issues, an area where the GOP and its national security hawks have traditionally dominated Democrats in public opinion.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
INDIANAPOLIS - Arguing that President Obama has diminished the nation's standing in the world and impending defense cuts imperil its safety, Mitt Romney on Wednesday pledged to not seek to balance the budget by cutting military spending and to improve mental health access and education opportunities for service members and veterans. “Paul Ryan and I have a plan to keep America strong and secure, prosperous and free,” Romney told thousands of veterans at an American Legion conference here. “Where the president has failed to lead, we will protect our national defense from cuts that jeopardize critical missions.  Where he's let down our veterans, we will welcome them home to a blooming economy and the jobs they need.  Where he's dodged the tough choices, we'll confront them head on and deliver a better future for Americans of this generation and the next.”  PHOTOS: Scenes from the GOP convention Romney left the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Wednesday morning to make a brief trip here, and planned to head back in the early evening and then watch the Wednesday night convention speech of running mate Ryan from his hotel room.
NATIONAL
February 23, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The nation's budget solution was never supposed to look like this: Congress and the White House staring at across-the-board spending cuts that will begin slashing indiscriminately through the federal government in a matter of days. Each side had expected cooler heads to prevail, assuming the other would set aside its political preferences and compromise to prevent the economic problems that are widely expected from a sudden reduction in the flow of federal funds. House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2013 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Feb. 10 - 16, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SATURDAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY The Chris Matthews Show State of the Union address; defense cuts; drones: Joe Klein; David Ignatius; Elisabeth Bumiller; Gloria Borger (N) 5:30 a.m. KNBC Today Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. (N) 6 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N)
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Who says congressional Democrats aren't trying to cut spending? Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) seems determined to chop discretionary budgets by more than $100 billion this year, regardless of what economists (and the unemployment rate) may suggest about the fragility of the recovery. Granted, it's not that Reid is calling for the cuts to go into effect on March 1, as currently scheduled. In fact, he says the opposite. But the alternatives that Reid and House Democrats are floating are such political nonstarters, it's hard to imagine anything else happening.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - Vicky Geron's restaurant a few blocks from the gates of the naval base here and the 86-acre Nassco shipbuilding yard depends on the weekday lunch crowd, split evenly between sailors and defense contractors. Geron said her recession-battered Mexican eatery in this industrial stretch of the Barrio Logan neighborhood could be closed down if the country fails to avoid the "fiscal cliff" - the triggering of automatic defense cuts along with tax hikes - because no deal was reached on the federal budget.
OPINION
December 8, 2012
Re "Defending defense cuts," Opinion, Dec. 4 As Andrew Cockburn points out, the DefenseDepartment routinely channels huge amounts of taxpayer money to fund white-elephant projects such as the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and the Littoral Combat Ship, neither of which would have been helpful in preventing the 9/11 attacks or in dealing with its perpetrators. The military-industrial complex continues to develop weapons designed to defend against a conventionally armed nation-state at a time when our most serious threat has come from a splintered network of cave-dwelling fanatics.
OPINION
December 4, 2012 | By Andrew Cockburn
Now that the media are running out of engrossing revelations regarding the private lives of powerful generals and spy chiefs, we have to revert to the infinitely less entertaining topic of the "fiscal cliff" and all that it may entail. But the two issues have more in common than most people might think. Lavish four-star lifestyles, complete with beribboned uniforms, private jets, police motorcycle escorts, cooks and valets, sound very much like militarism, defined by its historian, Alfred Vagts, as "transcending true military purposes … displaying the qualities of caste and cult.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2012 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - "Unthinkable," declares Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. "A disaster," predicts Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta. "Devastating," agrees Sen. John McCain. "Deeply destructive," warns President Obama. America's longest wars are finally ending, but politicians from both parties worry about the strange new peril facing the Pentagon: impending automatic budget cuts. Unless Congress and the White House reach a compromise, Pentagon spending will be slashed by $54 billion on Jan. 2. That could force layoffs of 100,000 Defense Department civilian employees, devastate vast parts of the defense industry, and affect purchases of ships, planes and almost everything else the world's largest military buys.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak and Michael A. Memoli
BOCA RATON, Fla. - A pugnacious President Obama cast Mitt Romney on Monday night as a defense and foreign policy amateur, accusing him of naiveté and shifting positions that would undermine the country's well-being at home and its security abroad. “The problem is … on a whole range of issues,” Obama said in one biting exchange, “you've been all over the map.” Romney took a more temperate tone but nevertheless accused the president of repeatedly apologizing for the country abroad - something the president vigorously denied - and failing to stand up for its ideals, especially during the revolutionary "Arab Spring.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2012 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - "Unthinkable," declares Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. "A disaster," predicts Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta. "Devastating," agrees Sen. John McCain. "Deeply destructive," warns President Obama. America's longest wars are finally ending, but politicians from both parties worry about the strange new peril facing the Pentagon: impending automatic budget cuts. Unless Congress and the White House reach a compromise, Pentagon spending will be slashed by $54 billion on Jan. 2. That could force layoffs of 100,000 Defense Department civilian employees, devastate vast parts of the defense industry, and affect purchases of ships, planes and almost everything else the world's largest military buys.
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